Google explains speed test video, not all shots were live web pages

Neowin previously reported this week about the Google Chrome speed test was misleading, by using a locally loaded webpage.  In the video, one scene in particular when the potato shoots across the screen, you can make out that the browser was in fact loading the webpage from the desktop.

Neowin managed to get an official word from a Google PR spokesperson to tell us a little more about how the video was shot.  Google did indeed confirm that two parts of the video were shot using a locally loaded webpage, while the other scene, Chrome vs. sound, was filmed loading Pandora.com from the Internet, on a 15Mbps connection.

In the email, Google explains the reasoning behind filming Chrome vs. potato with a locally loaded webpage:

For the Chrome Browser vs. Potato film, we used a version of the web page allrecipes.com that is accessible when logged in. About four hours into the Potato Gun shoot we decided to use a locally loaded version of the web page to enable more precise synchronization with the potato gun. We finally got the shot we were hoping for after 51 takes.

The same goes for the third test in the video, Chrome vs. lightning:

For Chrome Browser vs. Lightning, we used a locally loaded version of weather.com that was legally approved for use in this video (and all the standard website permissions procedures that goes into making videos!)

However, Google did mention that the second test in the video, Chrome vs. sound was filmed during a live loading of Pandora.com, using a 15Mbps Internet connection:

For Chrome Browser vs. Sound, we loaded an artist page from Pandora.com, a streaming internet radio service directly off the web on a 15Mbps internet connection.

Google has also updated their YouTube video description to clarify how the pages were rendered.  Google also mentioned in their email to Neowin that the video was filmed at actual webpage rending speeds, and setup these tests to demonstrate exactly how fast Google Chrome can render webpages.

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33 Comments

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Sheesh, I think it was meant to be FUNNY... I know that Chrome is the fastest browser and this opinion is coming from a Firefox user...

Speed is NOT everything. Features and usability still matter. That is why I have not switch from Firefox. It's fast enough and has tons of features.

I thought comparing loading speeds against lightning and potatoes would infer a certain aspect of fun, at the risk of losing seriousness and precision. Stop taking everything so seriously.

spengbab said,
I thought comparing loading speeds against lightning and potatoes would infer a certain aspect of fun, at the risk of losing seriousness and precision. Stop taking everything so seriously.

Don't be hatin'! Potatoe launching while browsing is serious business around here!

MightyJordan said,
Hmm, I think I spotted an error in the Lightning one. The wooden beam presses down on the right mouse button, not the left.

You're completely right. But it is possible it clicked both, right click first, and just barely getting the left click. But something looks wrong.

Just as an FYI 15MB and 15Mb are totally different. There to my knowledge is no such thing as a 15MB internet connection. 15Mb on the other hand does exist

SharpGreen said,
Just as an FYI 15MB and 15Mb are totally different. There to my knowledge is no such thing as a 15MB internet connection. 15Mb on the other hand does exist
You wouldn't believe in a 120Mbps (aka, 15MBps) connection!? Shame on you.

In seriousness, I agree, this should be corrected. This is a tech site.

SharpGreen said,
Just as an FYI 15MB and 15Mb are totally different. There to my knowledge is no such thing as a 15MB internet connection. 15Mb on the other hand does exist

15MB = ~150Mbps
150Mbps isn't fast in comparison with what a level 1 ISP can supply or even a level 2.

Err ya, sorry about that.
Just for future use, use the Report a Problem, as most of us don't have time to read every comment.

Thanks tho!

n_K said,

15MB = ~150Mbps
150Mbps isn't fast in comparison with what a level 1 ISP can supply or even a level 2.

Well ok. I hadn't thought of that. I do know of a 100Mbps fiber connection in a town in my state, but no 150 ones

Also you're welcome Andrew, I had the thought to click "Report a Problem" like 10 seconds after posting my comment. Next time I will

SharpGreen said,

Also you're welcome Andrew, I had the thought to click "Report a Problem" like 10 seconds after posting my comment. Next time I will

No worries

SharpGreen said,

Well ok. I hadn't thought of that. I do know of a 100Mbps fiber connection in a town in my state, but no 150 ones

Also you're welcome Andrew, I had the thought to click "Report a Problem" like 10 seconds after posting my comment. Next time I will

Southern Cross Cable can do 240 gigabit/s. Maybe not a fair comparison... but the technology for 150MB is very common.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Cross_Cable

SharpGreen said,
Just as an FYI 15MB and 15Mb are totally different. There to my knowledge is no such thing as a 15MB internet connection. 15Mb on the other hand does exist

I don't know what we're limited to but we have unlimited (to the potential of the available bandwith) internet/network speeds in the Unix network labs at QUT (university in Brisbane, Australia) and I've reached 13MB/s before so yeah... food for thought.

SharpGreen said,
Just as an FYI 15MB and 15Mb are totally different. There to my knowledge is no such thing as a 15MB internet connection. 15Mb on the other hand does exist


MB= "Megabytes" This is used to measure storage capacity. Mb= "Megabits". Its used to measure transfer rates. A 15/16 Mb/s will get you 2MB/s.

Just clearing this up. To look for your selves, here's a calculator.

http://www.matisse.net/bitcalc...gabytes&notation=legacy

Ad Man Gamer said,


MB= "Megabytes" This is used to measure storage capacity. Mb= "Megabits". Its used to measure transfer rates. A 15/16 Mb/s will get you 2MB/s.

Just clearing this up. To look for your selves, here's a calculator.

http://www.matisse.net/bitcalc...gabytes&notation=legacy


That is not a very accurate thing to say
You don't really need a calculator you just need to know that 8 bits = 1 byte and neither are used specifically for one thing.

Ad Man Gamer said,


MB= "Megabytes" This is used to measure storage capacity. Mb= "Megabits". Its used to measure transfer rates. A 15/16 Mb/s will get you 2MB/s.

Just clearing this up. To look for your selves, here's a calculator.

http://www.matisse.net/bitcalc...gabytes&notation=legacy

Where is this rule stated? While IPS's report speed in Mb's (probably to make is seem higher) most computers report transfers rates in KB or MB. I don't think I've ever used a browser that displayed my transfer rate in Mb. The same goes for dedicated file transfer apps like torrent programs, ftp managers, etc.

I wish I could get those kinds of rendering speeds that Chrome is getting, but Firefox just seems to be faster.
Maybe it's all the ads that Chrome still can't properly block. Yeah, let's go with that.

Singh400 said,
Nice of them to reach out and explain everything

Yes, they should disclose that, but it isn't as if they were being dishonest. If you are showing of the rendering speed of a browser then using local content is valid. Why risk letting the speed of the Internet connection or a web server you have no control over impact the test? Using locally hosted content (not cashed but local) the browser is still doing the same amount of work but with the equivalent of a 1Gbps connection (or even faster if it is stored on the same computer).

Edited by sphbecker, May 7 2010, 1:39pm :

sphbecker said,

Yes, they should disclose that, but it isn't as if they were being dishonest. If you are showing of the rendering speed of a browser then using local content is valid. Why risk letting the speed of the Internet connection or a web server you have no control over impact the test? Using locally hosted content (not cashed but local) the browser is still doing the same amount of work but with the equivalent of a 1Gbps connection (or even faster if it is stored on the same computer).

+1 I agree.
you don't start timing the speed of a car, before the fuel arrives do you?