Google releases Chrome 10

Google has released a new version of its Chrome web browser, removing support for H.264 and adding in a 66% faster JavaScript engine. This version 10 release comes only seven weeks after version nine, maybe we will see Chrome 24 by 2012.

The major change is in the Chrome Options screen which has been revamped and will now, according to the official blog, "help you get to the right settings quickly so you don’t have to dig endlessly to find a way to import your bookmarks or change your browser’s homepage." Instead of using the traditional menus, users are now able to type the setting option into the address bar instead.

This release also features the new Crankshaft JavaScript engine which was included with the recent beta. "Even your most complex web apps will run more quickly and responsively," the blog continues to say.

Users who switch between work and home should now find it easier to keep configuration consistent and tidy using the new synchronisation tool to keep on top of bookmarks, extensions, passwords and settings. This is an easy to use option with just a simple sign in with your Google account or by creating a new one.

The removal of the H.264 codec may not come as a surprise to many as Google said they would cut it out earlier this year due to a patent issue with a group of companies including Microsoft. For HTML5 content the browser still has support for Theora and WebM codecs, both of which are open source.

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h264 seems to be the standard as others have said as it's basically got hardware acceleration in most fairly modern graphics card.

why would Chrome remove it? (not that it matters to me to much since i basically don't use Chrome much but still )

ThaCrip said,
h264 seems to be the standard as others have said as it's basically got hardware acceleration in most fairly modern graphics card.

why would Chrome remove it? (not that it matters to me to much since i basically don't use Chrome much but still )

I think h264 will become the standard and eventually Google will have no choice but to come crawling back to it.

Skyfrog said,
I think h264 will become the standard and eventually Google will have no choice but to come crawling back to it.

H.264 is a standard but one unsuitable for being a web standard. Web standards *explicitly* require that they can be implemented and distributed freely. Imagine if you had to pay license cost to use HTML or CSS.

Google is full of crap, they aren't doing this as some white knight gesture to protect us all from royalty fees. They're doing it because they want to push their format instead. I wouldn't use Chrome anyway, Google is as shady a company as they come.

Edited by Rigby, Mar 9 2011, 8:36am :

TRC said,
Google is full of crap, they aren't doing this as some white knight gesture to protect us all from royalty fees. They're doing it because they want to push their format instead. I wouldn't use Chrome anyway, Google is as shady a company as they come.

+1

Erunno said,

H.264 is a standard but one unsuitable for being a web standard. Web standards *explicitly* require that they can be implemented and distributed freely. Imagine if you had to pay license cost to use HTML or CSS.


thank god Microsoft pays that license for us windows users
iirc Apple comes default with the codec aswell. (or will in future macOS releases) not sure which.
so whats the problem? 99% of computer users in the world are covered.

dont cry for the last 1-2% of users running linux that doesnt come with this codec installed.

TRC said,
They're doing it because they want to push their format instead.
Given that it's an open, royalty free standard ... what would be the point?

Is there a way to browse settings in the normal manner also?

When I start using a new browser I tend to look around the options to see if there's anything that interests me that previous browsers didn't support.

these article header images has to stop.
get it done by a designer, or don't do it at all. Amateur versions are not appreciated on one of my favorite tech-news sites.

1./ Are Aero buttons properly placed? Or they need another million+ duplicate bugs on this matter..
2./ Did they finally fixed "Other Bookmarks" issue, which were not possible to delete?
3./ Has that stupid universal adress bar finally drop down button?
4./ It is installed properly to "C:\Program Files\" or they are still using some custom folder burried deep into users home folder?

6205 said,
1./ Are Aero buttons properly placed? Or they need another million+ duplicate bugs on this matter..
2./ Did they finally fixed "Other Bookmarks" issue, which were not possible to delete?
3./ Has that stupid universal adress bar finally drop down button?
4./ It is installed properly to "C:\Program Files\" or they are still using some custom folder burried deep into users home folder?

i hate the fact that Chrome installs without beeing able to change folders or w/e. It just starts the setup, installs and tells you its done.
besides that it tells you its done, it uses the same 'lowsy' way as allot of malware use.
glad i stopped using google apps on my own system, hope they someday release apps that dont act like they are malware and datamining everything you do on a system.

According to the voiceover in that video, Chrome's new settings interface, let's me configure Chrome
the way I like it on my computer. Really? So ... where's the Customise Toolbar settings? Where's the setting to add the Menu bar? Where's the setting to move the tabs bar below the Location Bar. Where's the option to make Chrome not look like a browser designed for an internet kiosk?

Essentially, Chrome is still as over-simplified and as dumbed down as it ever was.

When I want to test something works for the average Joe I use IE8. When I want to run Firebug or do some complex stuff for which I require an addon I start FF (which I used for 3 years back in the day). But reality is, 99% of the time all I really want is just a a very fast browsing experience and little else (apart from downloading a file). And that's how I ended up with Chrome, and that's why I love it. Fanboy? Maybe. Happy user? Definitely.

Nice to see the GPU acceleration and dynamic rendering a bit faster, although far from stable.

However it is able to hit about 1/5 the speed of IE9 now on a lot of HTML5/CSS3 graphical testing - which is a a big jump from 1/100 and 1//500th the speed that we were seeing in previous versions on demanding dynamic graphical content.

I don't care for Chrome, because I don't like Google's advertising angle, but hopefully the graphical speed improvements will find a way back to Webkit and other browsers will now realize how important layout and rendering performance is and start to catch up to IE9 too.

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