Google retiring Chrome Frame for older Internet Explorer versions

In 2009, Google launched the Chrome Frame plug-in for older versions of Internet Explorer. The idea was that users of IE would be able to access Chrome's WebKit-based browser engine so they could use features that the older versions of IE could not support.

The plug-in supported IE 6, 7, and 8 at first and later Google added support for IE 9 as well. Microsoft didn't care for Chrome Frame, stating around the time of its launch that it increased the risks for malware and security issues for IE users that installed the plug-in.

This week, Google announced that it was going to retire Chrome Frame. In a post on its Chromium blog, the company stated its reasons:

Today, most people are using modern browsers that support the majority of the latest web technologies. Better yet, the usage of legacy browsers is declining significantly and newer browsers stay up to date automatically, which means the leading edge has become mainstream.

Google will stop all updates and official support for Chrome Frame sometime in January 2014, but did not give a specific date for its shutdown. Of course, Google says that individuals and businesses should consider using its own Chrome browser for their needs, even if they need to run older applications.

Source: Google | image via Google

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13 Comments

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Personally I'd like to see Google just drop Google Frame. As far as I can see it serves no useful purpose.

Does anyone know of a case where it has actually helped?

EDIT: Just read the original article and they are just dropping it altogether.

Yes... I use it at work. I have PC's which access online applications from Honda and BMW which require Internet Explorer (they use ActiveX Controls) and applications which require Chrome or Firefox. Instead of giving them full access to Chrome (and reducing phone calls when they can't access an application) I use this. The only application which requires Chrome/Firefox added the required tag to the metadata so it works flawlessly.

Mr_Self_Destruct said,
Wasn't this Google coming to the rescue of desperate users who for some reason or other were stuck with old versions of IE?

Yes, and with the *five years* of extended support for XP ending in April it is well beyond time that they should have had an upgrade.

I think it was about Google trying to get their web services out to the public earlier, without having to wait for IE to add some standards support. It's really about Google working for their own goals in the end. With IE 10 and its HTML5 improvements, any of that is unnecessary. Chrome Frame was simply designed for a different time.

Northgrove said,
...really about Google working for their own goals in the end...

Which is how every company on Earth works. Everything they do is meant to help them in some way or another. Even seemingly selfless acts tend to help them in the PR world.

I hardly think google was the issue with malware. always nice to blame someone else for your problems. does MS have any proof?- no just an increased risk. that's pretty darn vague

chrisj1968 said,
I hardly think google was the issue with malware. always nice to blame someone else for your problems. does MS have any proof?- no just an increased risk. that's pretty darn vague
Mozilla and multiple security companies agreed with Microsoft that Chrome Frame was way to risky to use.

DonC said,
I don't think it was based on any proof. Chrome Frame just increases the attack surface.

Exactly. There's now two engines to worry about rather than one.

So, now Chromes market share will decrease again?

I'm very happy they make an end on this and hope the plugin will remove itselfs, otherwise, we are stucked with an out-of-date Blink-version too.