Google rumored to be selling off Motorola cable TV division

In May, Google closed its previously announced $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility. Since then, the company has yet to reveal its plans for Motorola, except that it would be treated as a regular third party hardware maker when it comes to using Google's own Android mobile OS.

Now, a new rumor on the Light Reading Cable website claims, via unnamed sources, that Google is going to sell off part of Motorola. Specifically, Google could divest itself of Motorola's cable TV set top box division sometime later this fall.

The article claims that Google has already hired the bank Barclays Capital to handle the sale of that division of Motorola and could start accepting bids from other companies as earlier as September; a final agreement to sell off the assets could happen in late November or December.

One source claims that Google could get as much as $2 billion from selling off the cable TV business of Motorola and that more than one company could receive its assets.

This new report comes hot on the heels of Google's big fiber announcement in Kansas City, where the company will provide television service as well as 1 Gbps Internet access.

Source: Light Reading Cable

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9 Comments

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robert_dll said,
I'm curious, what does Motorola Cable TV service has to do with Motorola Mobility?

My thoughts exactly, I thought google acquired motorola mobility. Was not aware the STB business was included in that as well . But apparently that's the case. cable modems and STBs were spun off into motorola mobility

Julius Caro said,

But apparently that's the case. cable modems and STBs were spun off into motorola mobility
That's basically it. Motorola Solutions wanted to divest itself of everything not associated with its core businesses (radios and enterprise mobility). Plus it was added to Moto Mobility to help increase its overall value.

I miss those guys. One of the perks I had supporting the STB call center when it was still located at the Moto Solutions campus was being able to watch cable TV on my lunch break.

As a Mediaroom (Microsoft IPTV) customer who uses Motorola STBs exclusively, I am happy to hear Google will not keep this division.

I hope the rumor is true.

I hope Cisco doesn't buy it up. Maybe Pace or Tatung.

deadonthefloor said,
As a Mediaroom (Microsoft IPTV) customer who uses Motorola STBs exclusively, I am happy to hear Google will not keep this division.

I hope the rumor is true.

I hope Cisco doesn't buy it up. Maybe Pace or Tatung.

I dunno about Mediaroom, the service, but I hear Motorolas STBs/boxes are a joke and do nothing but crap out over and over.

GP007 said,
I dunno about Mediaroom, the service, but I hear Motorolas STBs/boxes are a joke and do nothing but crap out over and over.

Not to mention over-priced.
A xbox360 retails for less and eats Moto boxes for lunch in the specification department.
Still, they are cheaper than Cisco, which is why my company uses them.
I would like to see Tatung boxes come to North America, as they are the only manufacturer that has a low-power state as mandated by the EU.

GP007 said,

I dunno about Mediaroom, the service, but I hear Motorolas STBs/boxes are a joke and do nothing but crap out over and over.

Honestly, it's not that the boxes suck (they do), but cable companies aren't willing to pay the money to make a decent DVR. When Comcast comes to you and says "make a DVR for $100", and to make a quality one, it'll cost you $200, they are going to take their business elsewhere.

GP007 said,

I dunno about Mediaroom, the service, but I hear Motorolas STBs/boxes are a joke and do nothing but crap out over and over.

I used to work at a company that did repair work on Motorola STBs. We also did software conversions on them. We would receive brand new boxes from the factory, do some modifications to the mainboards, flash them with their new operating software and then do full functional tests on them.

Those boxes had a near 25% failure rate at every step of testing. Their most common failure was the Foxconn COAX jacks. About 50% of the coax jacks would be unable to have a cable inserted into them without modification to the jack (i.e. I would shove a pick into them before the cable) before insertion. The second most common failure was that using HDMI and optical audio output simultaneously would cause about 70% of their boxes to either not output video or not output audio. Motorola told us to stop testing those features simultaneously.

I decided to never buy a motorola product again after doing that.