Google to Digitize University of Texas library

Google and the University of Texas Libraries have agreed that over one million books will be digitized and incorporated into the Google Books Library Project. The University of Texas at Austin is the fifth largest academic library in the US thanks to 17 libraries containing more than eight million volumes. Other libraries currently involved in the Google project include the New York Public Library and the university libraries at Harvard, Oxford, Michigan and Stanford. Although constantly under fire for digitizing works without permission, the Google Books project aims to create a searchable online database of books available to anyone on the Internet. Copyrighted materials are limited to information about the book, a text excerpt from it and finally tips on where the book can be obtained.

News source: vnunet.com

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8 Comments

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Ha! Google library sucks balls compared to the one the HK library uses. Not all books are there, but whatever is there can be read in full. And there a lot of new books too, not just ones from 200 years ago.

If I wanted to read tips and **** about copyrighted books, I can just go to amazon. Thanks.

Copyrighted materials are limited to and abstract and some info and tips??? Aren't most of the books going to be like this? And with most of these being uni libraries, are most of these books going to be journals that are available to some extent online anyway (with a lot of printers digatising back issues as fast as they can). So what are they actually going to have in this library. Because Amazon have an absract and some info about the book, and wait! Info on how to "obtaine" the book! How long will it take to get permission to digitise all of this information?

Good idea, but I personally just don't see it working as well as they want it to. My uni library is having massive problems allowing digitisation of documents and books. So why would a non-academic company be allowed to do this? Are there any charges? Will some of the profit, if there is any be passed back to the copyright holders?

The limits to the abstract and other limited info as you have mentioned is for the public only. For example, for me to get full text articles off of some of the History and Psychology databases, I need to login through my univesity's library which then acts as a proxy so that the hosting sites can know I am a student.

As for a lot of the content being online already through third parties, that's true, but there are sometimes large gaps in what is offline or online because of subscription issues.

Napalm Frog said,
The limits to the abstract and other limited info as you have mentioned is for the public only. For example, for me to get full text articles off of some of the History and Psychology databases, I need to login through my univesity's library which then acts as a proxy so that the hosting sites can know I am a student.

As for a lot of the content being online already through third parties, that's true, but there are sometimes large gaps in what is offline or online because of subscription issues.

True, you do have to subscribe, and Google will most likely be free. But even without a subscription you can pay a one off fee to access a document if you so wish. It sounds like Google plans on creating a way of looking at the front cover but then not being able to actually access the content due to copyrights. I would be willing to pay a subscription for open access to all content on a massive library such as this. It would have massive benefits as long as there weren't to many restrictions in terms of being allowed to download and print content. Guess time will tell.

To help people find the books they're interested in.
It's like an online library where Google is the librarian, but that you're guided to books to buy, not books to loan.

And naturally, like in any store, you aren't supposed to read entire books before you purchase them.

This is definitely a good thing. Especially considering anyone could just go to a library and check the book out for free anyway, being able to access them on the internet is even better.