HP shows off Windows 7 powered Slate UI, including Flash support

Ever since Steve Ballmer showed off the HP Slate at the Consumer Electronics Show this year, there's been a huge amount of interest in the new device.

HP released a new video in late January with Phil McKinney, CTO of HP’s Personal Systems Group. McKinney claimed 2010 is the year of the Slate form factor due to "convergence of low cost, low powered processors" and Windows 7 which is a touch aware operating system allowing for third party applications to thrive. The latest video that HP was unveiled this week shows they are partnering with Adobe to provide a UI based around Flash content.

HP released two new videos on Monday. In the two videos it's clear Adobe Air applications and Flash based content are important to the new HP Slate. HP claims the Slate has "No watered-down Internet, no sacrifices."

Unfortunately there's still no pricing information available or a firm release date. Ballmer demonstrated the device in Las Vegas at the Consumer Electronics Show in January but HP had no devices available for attendees to observe. A HP spokeperson would only confirm the device is "coming later this year".

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Having watched the iPad keynote presentation I began to see the value of having - an iPod Touch! Then I took a look at the Touch and thought - too small. I would like to get a hands-on with Dell's device which is smaller than HP and Apple's tablet efforts.

Function is more important than form but the HP slate looks ugly, to me; I hope that's not a production model. I don't just mean the HP logo but the clunky looking back. It looks like an East European knock off of the iPad, minus the streamlined shape. If it has solid build quality I could forgive any number of deficiencies, especially if it has good battery life, multitasking and, critically, provided they get the price right. There is a long list of reasons why I wouldn't touch a first generation iPad, myself, and I suspect I will feel the same about the HP. The price war should be fun, though. Not something Apple are traditionally strong on, at all, ever, but they have made it clear they are ready for that one.

From what I've recently seen there are styluses for capacitive displays also so maybe there's a chance for handwriting recognition? In devices like this handwriting recognition is one of the key features IMO. You could take it to the meeting, make notes etc.

I won't be buying one, but it's amusing how a widescreen isn't nearly as strange looking on a tablet as the iPad cult of 4:3 has implied. :x

I hope it has ion2, maybe aero was off because it was on battery and not plugged in like a laptop how it turns off aero. and if the price is right, day 1 buy

medium_pimpin said,
Suck it, iPad.

I guess Flash really won't kill the battery.

Well, that remains to be seen, but the same can be said for the iPad's actual battery life. ;p

/we don't all just read books offline, Steve

Joshie said,

/we don't all just read books offline, Steve

more to the point, it turns out we won't run out of battery, because we'll "just plug it in" !!

sorry, what?

I wonder if we will still be talking about the latest and greatest slates this time next year. Something tells me this is just another fad like last year's netbooks. And although I think they both have their own market, they will probably see peek sells in the first year.

Prediction: You will not see as many netbooks for sell this Christmas than last.

Shadrack said,
I wonder if we will still be talking about the latest and greatest slates this time next year. Something tells me this is just another fad like last year's netbooks. And although I think they both have their own market, they will probably see peek sells in the first year.

Prediction: You will not see as many netbooks for sell this Christmas than last.

I do think netbooks and tablets are both a fad that are waiting for something better to be thought up. Netbooks have sold so well because they're cheap enough to own alongside a more powerful computer, but they let people have easy access to streaming entertainment, web content, basic time killers, educational material, and social networking. It's also the only 32-bit OS I have running in my house, so it's my go-to for a few tinkering tasks that require drivers otherwise incompatible with 64-bit Windows.

Ultimately though, my netbook has become a bedroom accessory for when I want to get online very quickly and don't feel like getting out of bed, hah.

Tablets are interesting for consumption and all the media aspects of a netbook, but are never going to be ideal for input because of the impossibility of touch typing. Handwriting recognition is a great solution--though typing on a keyboard will always be faster than writing by hand, a stylus will always be more efficient than a touch-screen keyboard. They'll be great living room accessories, and perhaps vacations, but as a commuter accessory or education tool? I just don't see it happening. A laptop at a cafe can make sense (though from a business perspective, you better be ordering something at least once every 30 minutes, or get out of my cafe >:[), but a tablet would look simply pretentious.

The convertible netbook/tablet, if it could get thin and have good battery life and a quality UI, seems like it would do better if simply because it can do everything both of the above can do, and thus appeal to a wider market. For some reason though, it gets almost zero love and attention because of 10 year old complaints about hinge quality--something long since addressed.

The nice thing about tech fads, though, is that they give the industry insight into what people want computing to do in their everyday lives. A netbook/tablet fad says that the device is filling some kind of demand, and the industry should explore that direction in its effort to find the Next Big Thing.

If only the gaming industry could figure the same thing out in the weird-as-hell relationship between PC and console gaming.

Looks like it's going to be a cheap copy version of an iPad with an OS not really designed for a keyboardless touch screen

argentum76 said,
Looks like it's going to be a cheap copy version of an iPad with an OS not really designed for a keyboardless touch screen

It's people like you that tends to make these go downhill. At least this thing has potential to be outside of someone's living room or starbucks coffee shops.

Since it has a REAL OS on it I guess it will need a mouse input touch when the finger touches the screen. It is how it recieves its inputs. Since your over glorified IPAD is good for reading IBOOKS, play IGAMES and read INEWS I guess it doesn't really need anything else right?

Cheap copy? When was the last time you held an IPAD or ISLATE? hmm please do tell. Give us the scoop....

argentum76 said,
Looks like it's going to be a cheap copy version of an iPad with an OS not really designed for a keyboardless touch screen

Ahh yes. Apple did invent the tablet computer despite that Windows-based tablets have been in the market for years already. Thank you for reminding us all that anything non-Apple is merely a copy of Apple's own invention.

C_Guy said,

Ahh yes. Apple did invent the tablet computer despite that Windows-based tablets have been in the market for years already. Thank you for reminding us all that anything non-Apple is merely a copy of Apple's own invention.

Apple was the first one to get it right. As with the iPod, iPhone, Macintosh GUI, etc.

Blue602 said,
Apple was the first one to get it right. As with the iPod, iPhone, Macintosh GUI, etc.
Wait, what? Are we in a future where the iPad has already been released and reviewed?

Which GUI are you talking about, btw?

Edited by Kirkburn, Mar 9 2010, 7:28pm :

argentum76 said,
Looks like it's going to be a cheap copy version of an iPad with an OS not really designed for a keyboardless touch screen

A comment like this shows a person that has never touched Win7 with Multi-touch or Win7 with a Stylus in a 'real' TabletPC configuration.

Win7 is fully touch aware, to the point that the taskbar pixels adjust when touch is detected to make sure things are easily touchable, and it works pretty slick.

Technically Win7 also supports 50 touch input points WITH PRESSURE. Something that no Apple product can even consider doing at this point.

Heck even the Zune HD does multi-touch with implied pressure as well, something Apple should have considered when designing a UI to respond to touch. (See the Zune compute the touch pressure for UI navigation and point recognition, making clicking on a pixel size button in the browser easy on the Zune because of this.)

People really need to actually use products for longer than standing in line at a BestBuy before they comment.

Can't wait to see the specs of this bad boy. I hope it has bigger hard drive then iPad. 16GB iPad for $499, are you kidding me? My mp3 player has more space than that for less than $200.

java2beans said,
Can't wait to see the specs of this bad boy. I hope it has bigger hard drive then iPad. 16GB iPad for $499, are you kidding me? My mp3 player has more space than that for less than $200.

Er, ok, I have no love for the iPad, but I'm not going to subscribe to every criticism that comes down the pipes. Couple things:

1) Storage isn't responsible for the bulk of the cost, so comparing the price of an mp3 player to a tablet based on storage capacity doesn't quite work. Odds are the screen alone is a bigger chunk of the price than the harddrive, and there's no screen like that on your mp3 player.

2) Not to mention, the cost of the iPad isn't too far away from the cost of an unlocked smartphone, which would have significantly less storage, short of investing in a very expensive 16gb microsd card (if it even supports the size).

3) The iPad (and this is both a selling point and a criticism) is just a consumption toy. Web browsing, streaming video/audio, and even digital books don't demand a lot from a harddrive, and assuming the thing allows shared folders across a home network, you could easily back-up to and load from other computers at home, just like those media boxes some people have at their TVs. Sure, playing a movie off another harddrive will be epic battery drain, but the only people who actually believe the 10 hour battery life claim are idiots who weren't immediately suspicious when Apple just said "10" instead of a RANGE like every single other portable computing device specifies (2-3, 4-6, 5-8, etc).

Joshie said,

1) Storage isn't responsible for the bulk of the cost, so comparing the price of an mp3 player to a tablet based on storage capacity doesn't quite work. Odds are the screen alone is a bigger chunk of the price than the harddrive, and there's no screen like that on your mp3 player.

Really? How do you explain this:
6GB WiFi only $499, WiFi + 3G $629
32GB WiFi only $599, WiFi + 3G $729
64GB WiFi only $699, WiFi + 3G $829

java2beans said,

Really? How do you explain this:
6GB WiFi only $499, WiFi + 3G $629
32GB WiFi only $599, WiFi + 3G $729
64GB WiFi only $699, WiFi + 3G $829

I don't see your point. I've already seen that chart. It shows an additional $100 for each step of doubling the storage capacity. The iPod Touch does the exact same thing ($299 for 32gb, $399 for 64gb), and Zune HD isn't too far off ($180 for 16gb, $250 for 32gb).

If, on the other hand, you're making a comparison to much larger drives--say, 100gb and up--then you just don't realize the difference here. Those very large drives are mechanical harddrives, and much cheaper to make. The smaller 16/32/64gb drives are not mechanical. It's a different technology, and much more expensive at the moment.

ccoltmanm said,
He's not really holding it! His hands move but not the Slate.

congrats to you for recognizing. HP engineers discovered a superconducting magnet levitation mechanism for their Slate device so that it can hang in air without the user's support.

Edited by zagor, Mar 9 2010, 3:10pm :

HP will kill this thing by over pricing it. Then some Korean company will produce a similar device for 1/3 of the price.

If they want to make a splash they should produce this device at $399 or less. I would tether it with my jail broken iPhone 24/7.


PS winphone 7 better support tethering

red hook said,
HP will kill this thing by over pricing it. Then some Korean company will produce a similar device for 1/3 of the price.

If they want to make a splash they should produce this device at $399 or less. I would tether it with my jail broken iPhone 24/7.


PS winphone 7 better support tethering

It's not up to MS WP7 to allow tethering. It is up to the Carrier. Always has been. HTC allows for this by plugging it in to USB. Apple updated it and crippled it. Well for some I am not sure of others on how easy it is to do so. I know that with my Blackberry Bold I was able to modify the software config and allow for BlackBerry Desktop tethering. It was nice to have it on the menu and I click on tether :)

I am not sure where you got the pricing from it yet? Could you please post?

The ideal slate for me is an iPad with a 16:9 screen and a front-facing camera, allowing video chat on some of the popular Messaging service (Yahoo! Messenger, Windows Live Messenger). iPad 2G, hopefully.

For that reason I will *not* be buying an iPad. The HP slate looks a tad thicker, thus heavier than the iPad. Being Windows, obviously lacks some of the visual (transitioning) effects showcased on the iPhone/iPad.

As we've come to realise, the UI plays a huge role in the success of a device.

I quite like it. But the crunch point for me is that it would need to support aero glass... the video doesn't seem to suggest either way.

wait, can you install an antivirus on this thing? like, from the web or usb cd rom? it IS running a full OS it looks like, I could see the win7 taskbar.

Izlude said,
wait, can you install an antivirus on this thing? like, from the web or usb cd rom? it IS running a full OS it looks like, I could see the win7 taskbar.
Was the title of the news article not enough?

Boy we have all types of incredible Slate designers out there huh? I love the "touch screen isn't as responsive as Apple's Ipad", "Aero Glass" or "Several Millions" future. You people truly crack me up.

To the touch screen guy - I am 110% sure you don't know how responsive either screens are at this moment. So making a bold statement like that is pure speculation and silly.

The Form Factor won't be dead if netbooks came out with Multi-touch. You have a clam-shell form factor with netbooks. You cannot open it up and hold it with one hand and touch with the other. Hence the reason for Slates/Ipads. Next time try it with a 10" netbook and let me know how it goes.

Also your prediction in markets is laughable. Do you predict futures as well? I mean futures in the market? You should be rich at this point.

The BIG WIN on this device is for applications that run on Windows 7 and could use a slate/pad type if form factor. Doctors, IT Departments, UPS/FED EX(currently use a form of it now), etc. The uses for this type of form factor with Windows 7 is much greater than with OS 3.2/4.0 at the moment.

I would buy one of these in a heartbeat. It would eliminate the hassle of opening and closing my 13" Dell Adamo when I am working on client stations or taking notes at the end of a consulting call. A Doctors office with a front end application to recieve patients will assist in good HIPAA pratices, etc. Restaurants could use it to take orders directly from the table, etc. There are so many uses for this form factor and I welcome you to tell me that it would be easier with a Netbook Clam Shell form factor to do these kinds of things even with MultiTouch?

It will not replace the clam shell form factor anytime soon but it will provide a better form factor for industries than can really benefit from the convenience of it. The PAD idea has been around for a while but not with these types of features and an full working OS. With Adobe AIR and applications it will truly make a great tool.

Your stance is a bit arrogant but your points are dead-on. From the comments I normally read on Neowin, it seems most readers have a consumer electronics perspective - which is what the iPod and iPad are targeting. HP and Microsoft definitely have the enterprise in mind. I see this device will succeeding in sectors needing a device that provides a richer experience than Windows mobile.

techfreak said,
Your stance is a bit arrogant but your points are dead-on. From the comments I normally read on Neowin, it seems most readers have a consumer electronics perspective - which is what the iPod and iPad are targeting. HP and Microsoft definitely have the enterprise in mind. I see this device will succeeding in sectors needing a device that provides a richer experience than Windows mobile.

Didn't mean to be that way :). But it just seems that before we ever get to see the products, touch it or feel it some people make these comments as if they have intimate knowledge of the actual devices firsthand. I love technology from ANY company and I am very happy that competition breeds innovation. The end users are the ones that benefit.

When i browse through some of these posts I guess I just don't understand how some people can judge a product without ever touching it or complaining about it when they know it is in Alpha/Beta stages. I guess I am hoping for more open minded discussions on its uses instead of its negatives or percieved limitations.

mrmomoman said,

The Form Factor won't be dead if netbooks came out with Multi-touch. You have a clam-shell form factor with netbooks. You cannot open it up and hold it with one hand and touch with the other. Hence the reason for Slates/Ipads. Next time try it with a 10" netbook and let me know how it goes.

I think you misread the post this is responding to. You didn't catch where he said "convertible" netbook. That's the sort where you can spin the screen around and lay it down flat so that it functions exactly like a tablet (bulkier, to be sure, but to the consumer who would be carrying around, say, a case and a keyboard add-on anyway, no different). In the case of a convertible netbook, good multitouch *would* give these tablets an interesting competitor.

Since it seems you're unfamiliar with this whole breed of netbook, you should check out the Lenovo S10-3t and the Asus T101MT (or similar) for an idea of what they look like. That sort of form factor is, personally, much more attractive than a slate tablet. I like a keyboard I don't have to stare at when I type, and I like knowing I can close it and drop it in my bag and go without having to be all ginger and careful about things.

+1

Plus, if people knew WHY the touch was less responsive... I have the same issue with my convertible HP Touchsmart running Win7. Seems to be that the touch driver is only enabled when you actually TOUCH the device. the millisecond or so delay is useful in conserving battery life.

When going from touch to Pen/Ink there is also a delay to disable touch interference with ink.

I think they HP do a great job of assembling quality works running Microsoft OSes.

mrmomoman said,
Boy we have all types of incredible Slate designers out there huh? I love the "touch screen isn't as responsive as Apple's Ipad", "Aero Glass" or "Several Millions" future. You people truly crack me up.

To the touch screen guy - I am 110% sure you don't know how responsive either screens are at this moment. So making a bold statement like that is pure speculation and silly.

The Form Factor won't be dead if netbooks came out with Multi-touch. You have a clam-shell form factor with netbooks. You cannot open it up and hold it with one hand and touch with the other. Hence the reason for Slates/Ipads. Next time try it with a 10" netbook and let me know how it goes.

Also your prediction in markets is laughable. Do you predict futures as well? I mean futures in the market? You should be rich at this point.

The BIG WIN on this device is for applications that run on Windows 7 and could use a slate/pad type if form factor. Doctors, IT Departments, UPS/FED EX(currently use a form of it now), etc. The uses for this type of form factor with Windows 7 is much greater than with OS 3.2/4.0 at the moment.

I would buy one of these in a heartbeat. It would eliminate the hassle of opening and closing my 13" Dell Adamo when I am working on client stations or taking notes at the end of a consulting call. A Doctors office with a front end application to recieve patients will assist in good HIPAA pratices, etc. Restaurants could use it to take orders directly from the table, etc. There are so many uses for this form factor and I welcome you to tell me that it would be easier with a Netbook Clam Shell form factor to do these kinds of things even with MultiTouch?

It will not replace the clam shell form factor anytime soon but it will provide a better form factor for industries than can really benefit from the convenience of it. The PAD idea has been around for a while but not with these types of features and an full working OS. With Adobe AIR and applications it will truly make a great tool.

http://www.cyberindian.net/wp-content/uploads/hp-pavilion-tx1302au.tablet-notebook.jpg nom nom nom eat your clamshell idea mate flip screen round and only difference is a few millimeters extra thickness except you have an actual keyboard more powerful hardware and capabilities which cover everything a tablet in this form can do but even more....

But then you remember why there's not much of these around because they're not practical in any way the same as tablet. Neither have portability of smartphones/pmps and very little to offer above it besides the whole e-book rubbish which nobody will use an lcd to read off if they have any common sense which is why e-ink was developed and things like kindle are far superior for. These things only benefit a small niche business market that's all they will cater for.

Edited by Digitalx, Mar 10 2010, 2:15am :

Digitalx said,

http://www.cyberindian.net/wp-content/uploads/hp-pavilion-tx1302au.tablet-notebook.jpg nom nom nom eat your clamshell idea mate flip screen round and only difference is a few millimeters extra thickness except you have an actual keyboard more powerful hardware and capabilities which cover everything a tablet in this form can do but even more....

But then you remember why there's not much of these around because they're not practical in any way the same as tablet. Neither have portability of smartphones/pmps and very little to offer above it besides the whole e-book rubbish which nobody will use an lcd to read off if they have any common sense which is why e-ink was developed and things like kindle are far superior for. These things only benefit a small niche business market that's all they will cater for.

Ah, but they cater to students, too, and far moreso than an iPad or other slate PC. By being multipurpose (laptop/tablet), they can adapt to more situations (taking notes or working on a term paper), and stylus input with a dash of One Note makes the class room experience that much better.

Just sayin'. It's why I want one, myself.

java2beans said,

No.. You say "iPad", I say "MAXiPad"

+1 I say the same thing.

There's nothing to get excited about with the MaxiPad. It doesn't nothing new or exciting. Yay, we get a bigger screen! Wow, I'm gonna go pick one up on day one just like I did with the iPhone 3G... I don't think so!!!

Windows 7 might not be perfect but it does offer a lot more than the MaxiPad. All they have to do is get the battery life at a reasonable length and sold! Actually, that is one thing I will be picking up soon after launch or soon after they get a good device similar to the HP Slate. I find the HP Slate to be a little bulky. When it's redesigned to actually look good too, not just function, I'll go pick one up. It won't take them long.

odd... it has transparency(aero glass) on keyboard not on taskbar it has h264 acceleration but not enough gpu power to provide aero glass across the interface... It could be for power saving purposes but for demo video it's rather botchy post editing job if anything..

On personal note, as good as flash is I certainly wouldn't touch/use a 'custom interface' on top of windows made with flash on a low powered device like that unless you want it to be snail pace... It's been proven in the past like on HP touch smart thing that custom interface native or flash or whatever it was horrid. Windows 7 has enough native touch support which the superbar was intended for to not need rubbish layered on top of it.

This form factor though imo doesn't have a "several millions" future, put multitouch monitors into tablet convertable netbooks then this markets dead pretty much.

Digitalx said,
odd... it has transparency(aero glass) on keyboard not on taskbar it has h264 acceleration but not enough gpu power to provide aero glass across the interface... It could be for power saving purposes but for demo video it's rather botchy post editing job if anything..

On personal note, as good as flash is I certainly wouldn't touch/use a 'custom interface' on top of windows made with flash on a low powered device like that unless you want it to be snail pace... It's been proven in the past like on HP touch smart thing that custom interface native or flash or whatever it was horrid. Windows 7 has enough native touch support which the superbar was intended for to not need rubbish layered on top of it.

This form factor though imo doesn't have a "several millions" future, put multitouch monitors into tablet convertable netbooks then this markets dead pretty much.

I would think offloading desktop compositing to the GPU would save power over having the CPU draw everything.

Digitalx said,
odd... it has transparency(aero glass) on keyboard not on taskbar it has h264 acceleration but not enough gpu power to provide aero glass across the interface... It could be for power saving purposes but for demo video it's rather botchy post editing job if anything..

On personal note, as good as flash is I certainly wouldn't touch/use a 'custom interface' on top of windows made with flash on a low powered device like that unless you want it to be snail pace... It's been proven in the past like on HP touch smart thing that custom interface native or flash or whatever it was horrid. Windows 7 has enough native touch support which the superbar was intended for to not need rubbish layered on top of it.

This form factor though imo doesn't have a "several millions" future, put multitouch monitors into tablet convertable netbooks then this markets dead pretty much.


In the first Video 'Aero' is on consistently; however, the transparency level is turned to OFF.

In all other presentations and live demos, Aero ihas always been ON with the transparency level left at ON as well.


On Win7, for example on a Netbook, you can set Aero to flip to non-transparency when going on batteries. This still uses the WDDM and all the Aero features, but stop the extra processing of the 'glass/transparency' effect. Aero with no transparency is very different than running in 'Basic' mode.

Being that this is truly Win7, you can choose how you want the display to work and look, full glass all the time or lose the transparency when battery gets low or even run the interface in legacy Win2K mode if you are a minimalist.

In theory Aero with Transparency off is the most efficent, as it gets the GPU acceleration features of the WDDM (Composition, assisted drawing, etc) but without the extra processing of the Glass.

I agree the HP applications could either hurt or possibly help the device. On Vista when HP designed their touch applications, they were needed as the OS didn't go 'oh touch screen let me adjust the UI to be more friendly'; however, Win7 does do this so the need of the HP applications are a bit redundant but again since it is Win7, people can just ignore the HP crap and use Media Center and Photo Gallery etc that are all designed on Win7 for touch.

HP needs to take advantage of Win7 by offering a stylus, this is something that works really well WITH touch and would give people the Tablet experience if they want it.

Axel said,
No mention on battery life?

seems to me it's going to be a touch-enabled, keyboard-less netbook. Chances are, the battery life going to be the same as a typical netbook, or more depending on the size of the cells.

Still waiting for the; "It is just like the iPad only with Windows instead of an Apple OS." They must still be asleep.

Pam14160 said,
Still waiting for the; "It is just like the iPad only with Windows instead of an Apple OS." They must still be asleep.

But it is! /s

+1

Pam14160 said,
Still waiting for the; "It is just like the iPad only with Windows instead of an Apple OS." They must still be asleep.

Who must still be asleep? The 10 Apple users on this board? *yawn* your comment makes me sleepy. I might go BACK to sleep.

Shadrack said,

Who must still be asleep? The 10 Apple users on this board? *yawn* your comment makes me sleepy. I might go BACK to sleep.

10? Where have you been living?

argentum76 said,
It looks very chunky to me

It does look a little bulky but give a few months, maybe the next holiday season and HP will have a similar device that looks nice and thin and have the nice black shiny finish like their laptops but in the slate shape and size.

Avi said,
Wow, this should go on the web as: iPad.PROPER-HP

Just to play devils advocate...yes I would vastly prefer a full featured tablet PC to an iPad but they are different target groups just like the tablets with pen digitizers are also. This is more in line with the Tablet PCs of the past 6 or 7 years whereas the iPad is more an evolution of their iPod Touch PMP. The iPad is made for consuming content provided through iTunes. That's their main thing...essentially a glorified shopping cart but simple enough for people with money to burn and the desire for a fancy iPod/ebook reader. Tablet PCs have been around for years and were more of a precursor to the ultra-portable netbook trend. In a way I prefer some of the old ones because you could write on the screen during meetings and have it recognize your handwriting. Handwriting support is the one thing that would get me to look at something like Courier if it ever shows up in the flesh. It's more stripped down from a full notebook like an iPad but it doesn't confine you to jabbing at the screen to interface with it.

M_Lyons10 said,
It looks nice. I still think I prefer something like the Courier though... But to each their own, right? :)
Different target markets.

M_Lyons10 said,
It looks nice. I still think I prefer something like the Courier though... But to each their own, right? :)

All that the Courier is to me is a bunch of concept videos.

KirbzStar said,
It's Windows 7, so why wouldn't flash be supported anyway?

Answering my own question, I guess there may be updates to allow for as much flash content as possible to work with just touch screen input.

KirbzStar said,

Answering my own question, I guess there may be updates to allow for as much flash content as possible to work with just touch screen input.

You answered your own question in the first post. It runs a full OS of course it will run flash. What wont it do? Get the same battery life as the iPad.

Tablets work just like mouseclicks for the screen. If yo have a clickable or actionable object your finger can interact with it. that said im pretty sure flash 10.1 and adobe air have specific MultiTouch abililities now.

Hmm, might consider buying one of these or a netbook.
Don't know really, but I like the idea of being able to use flash application, hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...

turk4n said,
Hmm, might consider buying one of these or a netbook.
Don't know really, but I like the idea of being able to use flash application, hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...
I wouldn't install any Linux distro on it. Flash runs really bad on linux (fullscreen).

. . .hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...

Why? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of the touch screen, and is there a Linux out there that would allow the use of the touch screen?

Pam14160 said,
. . .hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...

Why? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of the touch screen, and is there a Linux out there that would allow the use of the touch screen?

All it would take is for someone to write a driver to do it :)

Majesticmerc said,

All it would take is for someone to write a driver to do it :)


Considering how long it's taken to still not have decent video drivers, that could take a century.

Pam14160 said,
. . .hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...

Why? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of the touch screen, and is there a Linux out there that would allow the use of the touch screen?

Nevermind the fact that if you buy this you would have also bought a license to use Windows. Principle goes beyond practicality for some, it would seem.

Pam14160 said,
. . .hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...

Why? Wouldn't that defeat the purpose of the touch screen, and is there a Linux out there that would allow the use of the touch screen?

my tablet has full touchscreen support with gentoo and win7 on it.

turk4n said,
Hmm, might consider buying one of these or a netbook.
Don't know really, but I like the idea of being able to use flash application, hopefully it will be easy to stick in any Linux distro...
If you're thinking of this just for a Linux distro, I would actually recommend using the Touchpad made by Always Innovating ( http://alwaysinnovating.com/home/index.htm ) as it comes with their touch-version of Linux, and it's cheap too, about $300 for the touchbook and if you want to add a keyboard with an additional battery in it, that's another $100. I'm debating on getting one myself, but they're back-ordered I believe.

what said,

Considering how long it's taken to still not have decent video drivers, that could take a century.

Know what you're talking about before you post! The video drivers for linux are fine, you have to be able to use Linux which is somehting I fear you know nothing of.

bnajbert said,

Know what you're talking about before you post! The video drivers for linux are fine, you have to be able to use Linux which is somehting I fear you know nothing of.

Of course, when my video card drivers didn't even exist for a period of two years and I was stuck in VGA mode that was entirely my fault. I mean, if only I knew how to use Linux the code would have magically generated itself.