HP still looking to push Windows alternatives, lowers price of Chromebook 11

The Chromebook is Google's attempt to move into the OS space and take on Microsoft. While Chromebook sales have traditionally been slow, the fact that HP (and others) keep pumping them out, means that there must be some traction for OEMs. And besides, with Microsoft getting into the hardware game, OEMs need to find ways to diversify their revenue streams, in case the Redmond giant starts cannibalizing their sales. 

What HP has done here is kept the internals of the Chromebook 11 the same (albeit, these are less likely to catch on fire) but has made them more 'fun' looking with new colors and a lower price. At $249 to purchase, the barrier to entry is obviously quite low here.

Running the show is the aging Samsung Exynos 5250 processor and like many other Chromebooks, there is 2GB of RAM and 16GB of flash memory. The device has an 11 inch display running at 1366x768 and comes with two USB ports and a headphone jack. By all means, this is a lower power machine and HP says you can expect about 6 hours out of single charge. 

Chromebooks are web browsers and that's about it but what that means is that you can use Google's suite of online services like Goggle Docs and Google Drive with the device. If you are constantly connected to the web, the basic specs should suffice but offline use of a Chromebook is generally not advised. 

Microsoft, while they may not admit that Chromebooks are a threat, must be feeling the pressure as it has been finding ways to make its OS cheaper (see Windows with Bing) for OEMs to make sure that their OS doesn't get overlooked at the entry level. 

Source: HP

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These companies should push Windows RT! Its far more useful than these useless Chromebooks. With RT you get Windows 8 store apps, plus all the goodness original windows has besides legacy programs. No viruses, longer battery life, starts up instantly.

All the very few people I know that have gotten a Chromebook, have returned them after realizing how lackluster those are. I can understand people wanting an alternative. Alternatives are good, unfortunately Chromebooks are not it.

I dont have a use for them but I can see where they may be useful. In the enterprise? No way, but for personal use for someone who doesnt want to spend a lot of money...For a few hundred bucks you can get a KB/M and a good sized monitor that will do what most people need it to do. Web, docs, Facebook, vid chat, email. For more power users, they will opt for a traditional Windows system. But for older people and again, for those who dont have a lot of money and need to be connected...this will be great for them. And yes, you can get a Surface RT as well but not everyone likes that platform and the way it looks or who makes it. Why there are alternatives and why people have choice.

Edited by techbeck, Jun 2 2014, 12:31pm :

So what kind of sales are chromebooks seeing? The only sales figure I see is that all OEMs sold 2million total for the whole year of 2013. It's next to impossible to find any kind of sales figures and anything you find is generally very disappointing yet we keep getting these stories with this underlying subtext that these things are picking up steam but they really only end up edgin out other Linux distros for marketshare.

Seriously Google should make Chrome OS more like Offline desktop and provide real alternative to MS Windows. Once they get their big money power and user start buying those, I am sure other software makers will start porting their program to Google OS as well and that will give some real competition to MS and bring them on track.

But then they would have to preload ads every time you connected to the internet. If you're not seeing their ads, then what good are you to Google?

webdev511 said,
But then they would have to preload ads every time you connected to the internet. If you're not seeing their ads, then what good are you to Google?

This will be diversifying their business. So they can make it OS division and they can build their strong foundation from there. Next logical step would be to build strong competitor to Office. They can buy Kingsoft Office and then go from there.

I just dont get chromebook for some reason. Its basically just a web browser in a laptop body for $249 when you can get some tablets like kindle fire HD for 199 that do far more. When I first heard about chromebooks I was thinking like $100 at most.

Having one's entire business completely dependent on one company (Microsoft) is a recipe for bankruptcy, something Nokia learnt very recently. I doubt HP, Intel, and others want to suffer the same fate. By adopting multiple OS', OEM's reduce their risks.

Besides, for most casual computer users, ChromeOS does the job fine.

@simplezz While diversification is generally good for any business, I have to ask if they poured the resources reserved for Android into developing better Windows devices or even lowering the price of existing products, how much better might their reputation and products be? Most of HP's consumer line of devices are quite frankly mediocre to junk. We just lived through a generation of Windows 7 HP desktops that were basically junk and have decided to go Dell for the next generation based on that experience. If they performed better, we might have stayed with them.

I hate to tell the author this, albeit here goes. . .MS feels little to no pressure from Goggle or another OS manufacture. What is probably happening is HP and the other PC makers are attempting to boost sales of their products.

That is an absurd statement "Google or another OS" - uh, if they didn't feel pressure, they wouldnt have made Windows free on small devices.

Also, hello, Apple? You don't think they feel pressure here...at all, in the slightest bit?

gregalto said,
That is an absurd statement "Google or another OS" - uh, if they didn't feel pressure, they wouldnt have made Windows free on small devices.

Also, hello, Apple? You don't think they feel pressure here...at all, in the slightest bit?


Microsoft doesn't even have to feel pressure from Google, they need to follow trends in order to stay competitive.

I disagree. Windows share is now below 90% thanks to Apple and Google as Linux remained where it was. If Microsoft feels no pressure, they need to readjust their senses.

$249 for a paperweight? Jesus, you can download Chrome for free over the web, if you really want it... HP has no one to blame but themselves for profit loss.

RT is way more than Chrome, Android or iOS. It has desktop grade features, which others have still to match such as multi-user, full featured desktop, device support, file and network share, Office, etc.

RT is full Windows, but for ARM while iOS and Android are phone OSs pushed which some folks started believing is "productive" but in reality are just consumption devices.

recursive said,
Still cheaper than a Surface RT.

It's the same price as a Dell Venue 8 Pro with full Windows 8.1 Pro, Office 2013, 2 hours longer battery life, twice the internal storage, and almost 1/3 the weight.

The picture is not a Chromebook 11, which is actually a much nicer looking machine than the picture suggested. It has a unibody constructions, weighs less than an 11 inch MacBook Air and has no fan which makes it completely silent. It also charges from MicroUSB, meaning that I can genuinely take a single charger to charge all of my devices.

As the owner of one of these devices, I can tell you that it is anything but a paperweight. Having owned one for a couple of months, I might even go as far as saying $ for $ it is one of the best devices I have ever owned. I can only assume that the paperweight comment comes from someone who has never really used one. Would have expected better from someone who spends most of their time correcting people that have never used the modern UI in Windows 8 about the fact that it isn't just for tablets.

It isn't just a web browser. It's offline capabilities are very impressive compared to it's web browser roots, with offline applications (i.e. in a browser but can be used without internet connectivity) and packaged applications (not in a browser, and typically used without internet connectivity). These applications also work on any machine with a Chrome browser installed.

There is a lot going for the device. I suggest you really pick one up and try to live with it for a while before spreading this FUD.

recursive said,
Still cheaper than a Surface RT.

you forgot to say that it is still useless... while Surface RT is quite a useful tool.

Fahim S. said,

I might even go as far as saying $ for $ it is one of the best devices I have ever owned.".

Wow buddy get off there, you can hurt yourself. Not even for the money it can be considered a great notebook/useful. For that get Linux on it and then you can claim that but then again the hardware is obviously crap.

Fahim S. said,

As the owner of one of these devices, I can tell you that it is anything but a paperweight. Having owned one for a couple of months, I might even go as far as saying $ for $ it is one of the best devices I have ever owned. I can only assume that the paperweight comment comes from someone who has never really used one. Would have expected better from someone who spends most of their time correcting people that have never used the modern UI in Windows 8 about the fact that it isn't just for tablets.

Glad you like it. I know people who like them as well. I don't have a need or want for one, but I can see how they can be useful. Several people here on Neowin like them as well.

We may eventually use them at work for trips overseas and countries where we cannot, or are limited, have a device that we can load email/docs locally. Need to keep data offline since we do business in countries where we have to be careful on what we bring with us. However, I did just order a Surface RT 2 for the same purpose so its up in the air which route we are going to take ATM...at least for the other divisions, not mine. :)

Edited by techbeck, Jun 2 2014, 12:25pm :