HP: 'WE ARE NOT DROPPING WINDOWS 8'

Last week, HP launched an online campaign to sell PC with Windows 7 installed, using the term "back by popular demand" to describe the promotion. While all major OEMs still sell new Windows 7 PCs, they are rather hard to find on their online storefronts and are traditionally targeting business customers. HP made waves because it was openly targeting Windows 7 PCs at consumers.

The move generated a lot of attention, with some speculating that HP was unhappy with sales of Windows 8 PCs and were trying to see if a more open sale of Windows 7 computers would be effective. This week, HP decided to respond to the speculation in a blog post, saying that the company simply wanted to give its customer a choice in products and operating systems. It added, "We like giving our customers the option to get the computer that’s right for them."

The blog points out that HP now sells PCs that run Windows 8, Windows 7 and even Android. However, the blog also said HP was committed to selling PCs with Microsoft's newest OS. It stated:

We want people to be happy with our computers – whichever option they choose – BUT WE ARE NOT DROPPING WINDOWS 8. Let me put this in perspective for you. All the five Windows 7 products we launched are available with Windows 8 as well. And in addition, we have several dozen more laptops and desktops that we only offer with Windows 8.

The company even threw in a final Vine video to emphasis the "choice" part of their blog but the post speaks for itself. What we will be curious to see is if other vendors start promoting Windows 7 on their landing page for consumer PCs.

Source: HP | Image via HP

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Given the way HP and their CEO have been seeming to distance themselves away from Microsoft, I highly doubt their original intention with plastering their "back by popular demand" all over their website. Not to mention the Chromebooks and lack of any notable compelling computers running Windows 8 (flagship models), and I would say HP has a vendetta against MS. This memo is just to cover their tracks...

Disagree. For one, HP's marketing is a bit of a mess. There are compelling consumer and enterprise products but they don't really tell folks about them. The Envy Revolve is a damn good convertible tablet/laptop. The recently reviewed Envy Recline is pretty good too (though with a few shortcomings). However I will be, and have been, the first to admit that some of HP's consumer products need more work.

Meg DID say that she views Microsoft as a competitor but frankly MS did that to themselves. Azure, Surface, Nokia, compete directly with MS partners/OEMs like HP, Dell, Lenovo, etc., etc. Each of these partners have started looking at other avenues for revenue that reduce their reliance on MS. Even Dell has Android tablets despite the fact that MS invested $2Billion to aid in the buyback to take the company private. The slow uptake on Win8 hasn't helped matters either. Most market observers believe Win8 has only accelerated the decline of the PC market.

MS has alienated their partner network and those chickens are slowly coming home to roost. IMO the next CEO would do well to repair those damaged relationships. Getting Win9 to market on time might help as well...

Great. Your first paragraph I agree with fully. HP practically never markets their stuff well. I haven't seen an HP ad on TV in years. Almost a lot of people I've met or know (as a senior college student) despises HP (because of their poor consumer models) or have no plans to buy another HP after their current one. When I was a freshman/sophomore, I noticed a great amount of people that previously had an HP went to an Apple model. One girl didn't get how to unlock her trackpad, because of the dumb double-tap motion in a certain part of the trackpad that triggers the lock/unlock touchpad. She ended up returning it and got a Mac instead.

I disagree more with your 2nd paragraph though. People like HP did it to themselves. Surface and Nokia was a response from MS that they not going to let poor hardware from companies like HP soil the Windows brand any further. Surface was meant to be the standard (just like Google did with the Nexus) that Microsoft expects their hardware partners to perform to. What Microsoft accomplished with the Surface and its most unique and distinctive features, represent the lack of innovation for many years from these hardware partners.

Nokia also promised to stay exclusive with Windows Phone, so they got the extra perks unlike companies like HTC, Samsung, etc. HTC made decent WP8 phones, but didn't put much heart into it like Nokia did, which is why MS showed a bit more positivity with Nokia than the others. Now buying them right out was a questionable move, but it's possible they'll use Nokia's device and services division to boost WP. You know, by integrating the features Nokia built natively into the OS (so all hardware partners get it), harnessing their patents and engineering features and allowing others who decide to create WP devices (maybe exclusively) access to them.

Windows 8 was a rushed OS job, and MS is to blame for that. Metro is a mess, and Microsoft should have gave more forethought before releasing as is. Then again, computers are lasting longer, people have found ways of installing the OS themselves or paying someone to do so on their current computers, among other areas that explain why computers aren't being bought as fast.

Microsoft's partner network is realizing they need to bring up their quality levels on the hardware side, and work with MS on the software side. The next CEO will ensure these partners commit to building more better computers and Windows 9 will refine where Windows 8 started.

Of course they aren't dropping Windows-8. That would be foolhardy. They are very smart, however, in publicizing that they can easily provide Windows-7 for those who want that OS. Just think...Microsoft's foolish decision to provide just the Metro UI in Windows-8 for all types of hardware/users created this totally unneeded mess. Oh well.

"The blog points out that HP now sells PCs that run Windows 8, Windows 7 and even Android. However, the blog also said HP was committed to selling PCs with Microsoft's newest OS. It stated:"

I don't get this statement from HP. How can a desktop/laptop come with 'android' installed? Android is a mobile os, just like iOS. Do they mean chrome os? Because if that is true, isn't chrome os not even remotely related to android?

EDIT: somewhat misleading statement there. After looking on hp's website, they do have an android tablet/hybrid. Much like the asus transformer.

#Michael said,
"The blog points out that HP now sells PCs that run Windows 8, Windows 7 and even Android. However, the blog also said HP was committed to selling PCs with Microsoft's newest OS. It stated:"

I don't get this statement from HP. How can a desktop/laptop come with 'android' installed? Android is a mobile os, just like iOS. Do they mean chrome os? Because if that is true, isn't chrome os not even remotely related to android?

EDIT: somewhat misleading statement there. After looking on hp's website, they do have an android tablet/hybrid. Much like the asus transformer.

You didn't look very hard. http://www.engadget.com/2013/06/24/hp-launches-slate-21-aio/

riahc3 said,
Hello,

Um, why is the title in caps? Even though HP sent its memo in caps...

It's a quote. You don't change what someone said when you quote them.

I don't really know why you'd go for 7 over 8 when buying a new PC. 8 can do everything 7 can, but provides improvements in speed, stability, and search. Just pay the extra $5, install Start8 and boom, all the benefits of 8, with the start menu you long for from 7.

No need to downgrade to get a feature that easily added to the newer version, especially when buying a new computer that comes with either.

LightEco said,
Just pay the extra $5, install Start8 and boom, all the benefits of 8, with the start menu you long for from 7.
Or you could perhaps use Classic Shell for free.

I'm not really supposed to mention Stardock's products, seeing as we don't sell them nor do we support them seeing as it's not our product, but I still recommend Start8 to customers, as it's one of the best start menus for those that still want that capability.

Overall, it's better than someone spending $100+ on Windows 7. Only time I recommend 7 is if they truly need the operating system for compatibility reasons within the company (which is quite rare).

dead.cell said,
Only time I recommend 7 is if they truly need the operating system for compatibility reasons within the company (which is quite rare).
XP I can somewhat understand (primarily due to antiquated IE6-only intranet sites or ActiveX controls), but 7? What runs in 7 but not in 8?

Romero said,
XP I can somewhat understand (primarily due to antiquated IE6-only intranet sites or ActiveX controls), but 7? What runs in 7 but not in 8?

I have no idea to be honest; I've literally only run into one instance where a real company had legitimate issues with their systems using 8 regarding the software they used. Might have been either custom software made from within or by a small third-party that doesn't have the resources to keep up with the latest OS releases.

Had nothing to do with their distaste for Windows 8, just that they couldn't utilize it.

Strange, I'd have loved to know what broke a Win7-compatible program completely under Win8, unless it was some sort of driver issue or they introduced some stupid stringent OS version checks.

Romero said,
Or you could perhaps use Classic Shell for free.

Whatever works for you. I've heard good things about both, but only used Start8 personally.

Romero said,
XP I can somewhat understand (primarily due to antiquated IE6-only intranet sites or ActiveX controls), but 7? What runs in 7 but not in 8?

It's a game, but I'm unable to run Bejeweled 3 in Windows 8 (non-Steam edition).

Romero said,
XP I can somewhat understand (primarily due to antiquated IE6-only intranet sites or ActiveX controls), but 7? What runs in 7 but not in 8?

Unless there's a flag in the installer that blocks installation on an OS higher than NT6.1. In that case, right click > Troubleshoot compatibility and set it to Win7. Done.

Romero said,
Strange, I'd have loved to know what broke a Win7-compatible program completely under Win8, unless it was some sort of driver issue or they introduced some stupid stringent OS version checks.

I have one. My virtualized intranet for VMware requires I make entries in my hosts file. WINDOWS 8 thinks it knows better by ignoring hosts file entries. So Windows 7 for me.

Many corps use custom hosts files so they can't be upgraded either

Sadelwo said,

Unless there's a flag in the installer that blocks installation on an OS higher than NT6.1. In that case, right click > Troubleshoot compatibility and set it to Win7. Done.

Also IE 8 intranet sites. EMC, Dell eSAN, are a few who still sell products RIGHT NOW that won't work with anything newer than IE 8. Does Java 6 work on 8? Probably not and banking sites rely on security holes and exploits for key functionality like exporting data via dcom to excel etc

LightEco said,
Whatever works for you. I've heard good things about both, but only used Start8 personally
It does work well and I just wanted to mention a free alternative, unless that's frowned upon because of Neowin's relationship with Stardock?

Setnom said,
It's a game, but I'm unable to run Bejeweled 3 in Windows 8 (non-Steam edition).
That might be due to stringent OS version checks as I mentioned above. Did you try Compatibility mode as Sadelwo suggested? Even PopCap says it should run, at least in Compatibility mode (http://support.popcap.com/win8).

sinetheo said,
I have one. My virtualized intranet for VMware requires I make entries in my hosts file. WINDOWS 8 thinks it knows better by ignoring hosts file entries. So Windows 7 for me.

Many corps use custom hosts files so they can't be upgraded either

So #1. It's clear you and those "many corps" are using Windows Defender instead of a better AV, and #2. Even if you all want to use Defender how long does it take to exclude the HOSTS file from being monitored and protected? I'm sure the sysadmins of those "many corps" can figure it out without too much trouble, and if they can't they don't deserve to retain their jobs.

sinetheo said,
Also IE 8 intranet sites. EMC, Dell eSAN, are a few who still sell products RIGHT NOW that won't work with anything newer than IE 8. Does Java 6 work on 8? Probably not and banking sites rely on security holes and exploits for key functionality like exporting data via dcom to excel etc.
I already mentioned intranet sites. The ones made for IE 6 mean even Win7 is out of the question unless you run an XP VM. So this problem is not new to Win8 and anyway more the fault of bad version-targeted coding (I've used intranet sites written during the IE 6 era that still run fine on Win8, so obviously it can be done). Java 6 does work on Win8 according to Oracle (http://www.oracle.com/technetw...-configurations-135212.html) although given how insecure Java is you'd be advised to update regularly anyway. As for banking sites that rely on security holes and exploits? Amazing. What shi**y banks are these, just so we can avoid them and also name and shame them?

Might have been royal bank of Canada. I told the IT director that horror but with 50 million in funds that must be moved daily a switch won't happen. The CPAs are used to having excel 2003 integrate with old Java and IE for floats and lines of credit where a lot is automated. This is not available to the public internet but through select customers who have corporate accounts.

Security is always brushed aside when someone needs a shiny thing that the business is so dependent on.

I for one am thankful they put it in caps. It really helped me understand that they are indeed dropping Windows 8.

Kyle K. said,
I for one am thankful they put it in caps. It really helped me understand that they are indeed dropping Windows 8.

Considering the way some 'news' groups have been promoting the 'HP hates WIndows 8 and wants to murder Microsoft' message I think caps are indeed necessary.

MrHumpty said,
I totally thought they were dropping Windows OS

Nobody has the intention of b̶u̶i̶l̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶a̶ ̶w̶a̶l̶l̶ dropping Windows 8.

Mr.XXIV said,
More like nobody has the balls to drop Windows 8.

Why? Millions of people have already tried it and dropped it... I format new laptops and install 7 on user demand every single day.