IE 10 demo page shows off "full screen" animations

Windows 8 is, for now at least, the only way that people can check out the Internet Explorer 10. While Microsoft has yet to reveal when IE10 will be released for Windows 7, the company is giving website programmers and designers some new ideas on how to create sites that can take advantage of the features in IE10.

In a new post on the official IE blog, Microsoft goes over how CSS 3D Transforms and CSS Animations and Transitions can be used in the programming of websites to create what Microsoft calls "full-page animations”. Both of these animation programming techniques are supported in Internet Explorer 10, along with the most recent versions of Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox.

When website developers add support for full-page animations, visitors to these sites can see pages move from side to side, turn in and out and more, rather than just simply load onto a browser page as usual.

Microsoft has also launched a demo page that shows off these full page animations in action. The pages also offer even more tips on how website developers can incorporate these special effects into their own sites.

Source: Official IE blog | Image via Microsoft

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34 Comments

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that demo page is super cool, but the amount of websites where you will see animations like that is probably really low unfortunately as i guess everyone on here probably already knows anyway

Hopefully these things will be used for web apps, interactive stuff, and games. Don't really need ESPN twirling transitions between sports stories.

kevcampbell said,
that demo page is super cool, but the amount of websites where you will see animations like that is probably really low unfortunately as i guess everyone on here probably already knows anyway

Co-ords said,
yawn...

Indeed. We're supposed to be excited about browsers adding bad video effects from the 1970's?

Web designers. There is a reason that no videos/movies use those "techniques" any more. They just junk up your content and make it look childish and tacky.

Oh, I guess that's why this is coming to Windows 8 first then...ahem.

excalpius said,

Indeed. We're supposed to be excited about browsers adding bad video effects from the 1970's?

Web designers. There is a reason that no videos/movies use those "techniques" any more. They just junk up your content and make it look childish and tacky.

Oh, I guess that's why this is coming to Windows 8 first then...ahem.

I think webkit was first with these actually. From 2007 http://www.webkit.org/blog/138/css-animation/

Bad... bad! Stop giving website designers tools to create more eye candy. We already have websites that have long intros which you have to sit through before you can actually start using them. I miss the days when they used to clean and gave you a good oversight of the content

Tpiom said,
Bad... bad! Stop giving website designers tools to create more eye candy. We already have websites that have long intros which you have to sit through before you can actually start using them. I miss the days when they used to clean and gave you a good oversight of the content

That's the designer's fault. They choose to use the tools to make long intros rather than a more aesthetically pleasing and easier to navigate site.

Eye candy is great, but it's up to the designer how to use it. Never limit tools.

Tpiom said,
We already have websites that have long intros which you have to sit through before you can actually start using them. I miss the days when they used to clean and gave you a good oversight of the content

Uh, those stupid Flash intros were a thing of the late 90s, not modern websites.

Kirkburn said,

Uh, those stupid Flash intros were a thing of the late 90s, not modern websites.

there are still a few out there unfortunately, NEW websites that is, not just old ones

Tpiom said,
Bad... bad! Stop giving website designers tools to create more eye candy. We already have websites that have long intros which you have to sit through before you can actually start using them. I miss the days when they used to clean and gave you a good oversight of the content

This is purely done with CSS. Which means is just a KB more or less with these lines of codes.

Second. This may not look good right now because they are applied to the web page completely. But Imagine loading a set of images with these effects: Superb! This is the start of a transition to better looking websites.

They need to work on getting websites to detect ie10 on metro and start directing us to those tablet optimized websites with html5 video.

jagowar said,
They need to work on getting websites to detect ie10 on metro and start directing us to those tablet optimized websites with html5 video.

That's already possible using JavaScript?

jagowar said,
They need to work on getting websites to detect ie10 on metro and start directing us to those tablet optimized websites with html5 video.

I'm not sure those web sites exist yet.

MorganX said,

I'm not sure those web sites exist yet.

They do for the ipad.... just saying ie10 metro should be going to the same optimized versions. Pulse is a good start but more websites need to be like pulse.

I'll have to read through the tutorial in detail, but my first impression is how horribly cheesy. What year is this? 1995?

Some simple sliding or fading effects may be nice on some sites though, providing it doesn't load a blank page in-between.

Fourjays said,
I'll have to read through the tutorial in detail, but my first impression is how horribly cheesy. What year is this? 1995?

Some simple sliding or fading effects may be nice on some sites though, providing it doesn't load a blank page in-between.

True, true. I went into this expecting some "Modern UI"-style animations, and instead I get Office 2002.

Fourjays said,
I'll have to read through the tutorial in detail, but my first impression is how horribly cheesy. What year is this? 1995?

Some simple sliding or fading effects may be nice on some sites though, providing it doesn't load a blank page in-between.

It's a demo, they show you what it can do not what you should use for your own sites and so on. My god, some people.

GP007 said,

It's a demo, they show you what it can do not what you should use for your own sites and so on. My god, some people.

I did acknowledge that fact in my comment. Hence why I said it was a first impression from the tutorial. I'd prefer practical demos to over-the-top demos like those used. Firstly it gives you proper ideas of how it could benefit your own sites and secondly it makes it far easier to understand just what you need to do something similar.

I remember they had things like these back in IE 6 too - in Frontpage you could enable animated transitions between pages which looked amazing back in the day.

~Johnny said,
I remember they had things like these back in IE 6 too - in Frontpage you could enable animated transitions between pages which looked amazing back in the day.

I remember this one 3D browser.... lol such useless effects.

andrewbares said,

I remember this one 3D browser.... lol such useless effects.


*shrug*
It's all about making your online presence attractive to potential customers. The internet is what it is today thanks to being pushed by commerce and the desire for profit.

Flashy effects are just one aspect of marketing.

torrentthief said,
Yawn, we just want IE10 for win 7 released already!

And I hope they do that, and fast! For the first time ever, IE works as a charm when programming with JavaScript. Even some basic CSS that would have given problems in IE9- it does the job correctly with IE 10.