IE Automatic Component Activation Now Available

Jefferson Fletcher: The IE Automatic Component Activation (IE ACA) update is now available as part of the April 2008 Internet Explorer Cumulative Update. The "click to activate" behavior, formerly required for ActiveX controls embedded in some webpages, is now permanently removed from Internet Explorer. For detailed information on IE ACA, see our blog post from last November announcing this update.

This update replaces the IE ACA previews released in December 2007 and February 2008.

News Source: IE Blog

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There wasn't a problem with it, just that Eolas Technologies took them to court for patent infringement, and they have now settled.

(Antaris said @ #3.1)
There wasn't a problem with it, just that Eolas Technologies took them to court for patent infringement, and they have now settled.

Well, I had (and will have until it has been removed from all IE installations) problems:
1. They should either have paid up earlier or not rolled out this bloody annoying "critical update", especially to customers not in US. Localised patent infringement is nothing to do with the RoW, especially software patents which don't even exist in my part of the planet. Either way the end user shouldn't have been involved. At all.
2. I've got to give about a 3 month window to ensure saturation before I can take out the workarounds (how many instances of SWFObject can I find? How many bespoke ones that do ALL <object/> replacements can I find?). Anybody who hasn't updated by then isn't going to, and I don't care about them. Even the corporates will have rolled out the unpatch by then.
3. Microsoft decided to sit on the unpatch for 4 months, even going as far to blithely state end users wouldn't get it through WU until April. Thanks a bunch.

Those who think I should keep on using SWFObject et al., no. The use of JavaScript to inject code into a document to present an embedded resource has two points of failure (not running script and no support for resource type), instead of just one (no support for resource type) that writing valid (X)HTML <object/> code has.

However, there is a benefit: my embedded content can now work in IE just as it always has done in Firefox. Hooray, it's 2005 again!

Does Opera still do this? <checks> Nope, 9.27 doesn't appear to.

(mrbester said @ #3.2)
Does Opera still do this? Nope, 9.27 doesn't appear to.
Latest snapshot builds, hummm yes. Edit: Arfffff, no.