IE Update to Disable "Click to Activate"

This is a preview of the update that will be available in April 2008.

If you don't recall, in April 2006, we made a change to how Internet Explorer handled embedded controls used on some webpages. Some sites required users to "click to activate" before they could interact with the control. Microsoft has now licensed the technologies from Eolas Technologies inc, removing the "click to activate" requirement in Internet Explorer.
"This change will require no modifications to existing pages, and no new actions for developers creating new pages," LePage said in a post to Microsoft's IE blog. "We are simply reverting to the old behavior. Once Internet Explorer is updated, all pages that currently require 'click to activate' will no longer require the control to be activated. They'll just work."

Link: KB Article 945007
View: Full Article @ IE Team Blog

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25 Comments

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exactly firefox is just much more customizable ;)

i.e. NoScript (block javascript unless you allow it on a per site basis etc) + Adblock Plus (blocks alot of popups etc etc)

so even though this is good news for IE users... it dont mean to much for the people who dont use it anymore.

please do not think this is a security change it has NOTHING to do with security... the activex control is still running its just the interactive part that is not... so if the control still could get to the file system it sill will..

I liked the “click to activate” requirement and think they should keep it. Without it, you could give control of your computer to advertisers or hackers just by inadvertently moving your mouse to a certain part of the screen (since these flash objects can respond to the location of your mouse). My mouse cursor tends to wander a lot while I browse.

Guessing how much confusion will be out there with mistaken double clicks if users got used to make an extra click.

thanks god i use firefox and didn't suffer from this stupid problem.

ramik said,
Guessing how much confusion will be out there with mistaken double clicks if users got used to make an extra click.

thanks god i use firefox and didn't suffer from this stupid problem.

it's not really a problem but a stupid issue foreced by a stupid lawsuit which techincally should of also been forced on FF an Opera also but the dumb place never went after them like they technically should of

neufuse said,
it's not really a problem but a stupid issue foreced by a stupid lawsuit which techincally should of also been forced on FF an Opera also but the dumb place never went after them like they technically should of

Opera does the same annoying behaviour even though there wasn't any threat of a lawsuit. I bet they won't remove it as they haven't "licensed" the embedding "method". So we're still stuck with it even when IE un-updates itself.

Firefox and Opera were given the OK by Eolas, MS whined about it, now they are doing the right thing (even according to them) and licensing it.

Only issue here is MS took so long to do it.

lunamonkey said,
Good news. No more stupid Javascript hacks.

That's as maybe, but the javascript hacks are an effective way of ascertaining which version of the Flash Player (if any) people are running, and directing them accordingly. Plus it's a much more streamlined way of putting a Flash file into a page than using the cr@ppy built-in MacrAdobedia method.

outlando said,

That's as maybe, but the javascript hacks are an effective way of ascertaining which version of the Flash Player (if any) people are running, and directing them accordingly. Plus it's a much more streamlined way of putting a Flash file into a page than using the cr@ppy built-in MacrAdobedia method.

There are built in methods in HTML to [embed] / [object] these assets. Any alternate content can go inside the tags also.

So if a browser can't support the flash object, it will skip the tag and use a nested JPG or GIF.

No script should be required / used, especially not bloated MacrAdobedia :P methods.

lunamonkey said,
There are built in methods in HTML to [embed] / [object] these assets. Any alternate content can go inside the tags also.

So if a browser can't support the flash object, it will skip the tag and use a nested JPG or GIF.

There is no way to discern the version in use from valid HTML; IE uses classid and codebase to interrogate the ActiveX control and flag a version below a defined number. Firefox won't render a <object/> with a classid / codebase attribute, hence the use of the (also proprietary) <embed/> tag inside the <object/>

In order to completely negate script, the <object/> has to call a version checker file which alerts if the user is using an older version, or loads the "real" file if it passes muster. If you don't have Flash at all, the nested content rule applies as before.

No script should be required / used, especially not bloated MacrAdobedia :P methods.

Agreed, they've always been crap.

So, they're making the decision now for you whether you want to active a control or not? How about removing activation completely from Windows itself? That would impress me.

SuicideChicken said,
It's not about Windows activation.
This is about the annoying 'Click here to activate this control' message within an ActiveX-control on a website.

No its about choice and how M$ believes that it knows better than its customers on every aspect of the OS..

Foub said,

No its about choice and how M$ believes that it knows better than its customers on every aspect of the OS..

For Christ's sake you're comparing apples and oranges here. What next?

"Microsoft reports fourth quarter profits."
Comment number 1: F*** M$ AND THEIR WGA.

Foub said,
No its about choice and how M$ believes that it knows better than its customers on every aspect of the OS..

What the hell are you talking about? This has nothing to do with 'aspects of the OS'. This is about removing the need to click certain content in web pages before it activates, due to a legal requirement. Do you want to have to click a specific area on a web site each time you visit so you can get the functionality?

What does 'choice' have to do with it? Do you want to choose to be annoyed and inconvenienced each time you visit a site?

Foub said,

No its about choice and how M$ believes that it knows better than its customers on every aspect of the OS..


For gods sake, get off you soap box already. The original behavoir of Internet Explorer was to automatically activate ActiveX controls when a page was loaded containing one. Then a couple of years back, Eolas complained that this behavoir infringed on a patent they held. This forced Microsoft to change the way that ActiveX controls were handled and this resulted in the current ActiveX behavoir you see today.

This latest patch from Microsoft simply reverts back to the original behavoir now that patent dispute is settled.

So as you can you can see, there is no conspiricy here.

Foub said,

No its about choice and how M$ believes that it knows better than its customers on every aspect of the OS..

Not to try to start a debate or anything, but I'm pretty sure they do. Whether they know more about what the customers want to see in an OS is another story.