IE usage grows in July, Firefox share declines

Usage of Microsoft's Internet Explorer has continued to grow, albeit slowly, since April, with Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome suffering market share falls in July.

Monthly information released today by Net Applications shows Internet Explorer increased in market share by approximately 0.42% in July, with Safari making a gain of 0.24% and Opera 0.18%. 

Mozilla's Firefox web browser suffered the biggest loss, with usage falling 0.9% to hold 22.91% of the US web browser market, while Google's Chrome browser fell for the first time since September last year, falling a modest 0.08% to 7.16%.

Internet Explorer has continued to make small increases in market share over the past few months, reversing a trend which previously plagued the browser as competitors bit into the market and stole users, resulting in IE's market share falling from 65.71% in September last year to 59.75% in May this year.

As mentioned above, it seems Google's exponential growth with Chrome may have come to a halt, with figures showing its market share fell for the first time since the browser was released. And Apple's Safari web browser, of which version 5 was released during WWDC in June this year, has continued to gain traction, now sitting with a 5.09% share.

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Hot said,
You know what it is? I will peg this **** right now. Firefox 3.6 has an INCREDIBLY frustrating bug whereby after being left open for a while, every few seconds it will spike to 100% CPU usage and stall on even the simplest tasks, such as opening a blank tab or scrolling an all-text page. And this bug is pretty darn common. I get frustrated with it daily. So no wonder that hordes of average users, who don't even know anything about computers or browser wars, simply default to the logical "Firefox is slow now? Time to use my other browser."

Yes, I get that and it is frustrating. After a while Flash video grinds to a holt and my laptop starts getting really hot.

i was a chrome user and decided to change. After testing the latest versions of Firefox, Safari, Opera i chose Opera.
It's "speed dial" (home screen) is better than it's competitors and it's customizable out-of-the-box. Firefox needs at least 10 add-ons to match Opera's out-of-the-box functionality.
Safari is heavy and unresponsive.

Firefox 4 will win back some market share when it comes out.
3.X was really starting to lag behind its competitors, but, so far the betas of 4 have been excellent.

Shiranui said,
Firefox 4 will win back some market share when it comes out.
3.X was really starting to lag behind its competitors, but, so far the betas of 4 have been excellent.

I highly doubt. Betas are so low quality. They does not fix any fundamental bugs from previous versions and new they are not anyhow better than Firefox 3 in terms of reliability and UI.

coth said,

I highly doubt. Betas are so low quality. They does not fix any fundamental bugs from previous versions and new they are not anyhow better than Firefox 3 in terms of reliability and UI.

You gotta be joking. Firefox 4 UI is WAY better then the original.

coth said,

I highly doubt. Betas are so low quality. They does not fix any fundamental bugs from previous versions and new they are not anyhow better than Firefox 3 in terms of reliability and UI.

Well Mr.Troll you've clearly never actually used Firefox 4, the UI is completely different compared to 3.6.x and it is a bit faster,

thealexweb said,

Well Mr.Troll you've clearly never actually used Firefox 4, the UI is completely different compared to 3.6.x and it is a bit faster,

I'm obviously not a troll. I'm just not so much brainwashed to so high level of fanaticism.

UI is poorly functional, bookmarking UI still not upgraded since 5 years and didn't found a place for upgrade in FF4 at all. New Firefox menu misses some fundamental options. And the skin has poor compatibility with aero - it's too monotonous. Not talking about the fact that it's still far away from to be nice. New addons windows has no friendly UI. Download Manager didn't improve in UI as well. Nearly nothing has been improved. Just slightly changed skin - that's all.

Places (SQLite based history, bookmarking and other staff to remember database) and Memory management weren't improved as well - still large memory leaks and lots of hangs caused by Places.

I see no real difference. It's just evolution, but FF needs revolution, because it's so much falls in interface and reliability to Opera and Chrome. And if MS will finally make new profiling system for IE9 i'm sure FF4 will lose to IE9 as well.

Shiranui said,
Firefox 4 will win back some market share when it comes out.

Internet Explorer 9 will win back some market share when it comes out.

coth said,

I'm obviously not a troll. I'm just not so much brainwashed to so high level of fanaticism.

UI is poorly functional, bookmarking UI still not upgraded since 5 years and didn't found a place for upgrade in FF4 at all. New Firefox menu misses some fundamental options. And the skin has poor compatibility with aero - it's too monotonous. Not talking about the fact that it's still far away from to be nice. New addons windows has no friendly UI. Download Manager didn't improve in UI as well. Nearly nothing has been improved. Just slightly changed skin - that's all.

Places (SQLite based history, bookmarking and other staff to remember database) and Memory management weren't improved as well - still large memory leaks and lots of hangs caused by Places.

I see no real difference. It's just evolution, but FF needs revolution, because it's so much falls in interface and reliability to Opera and Chrome. And if MS will finally make new profiling system for IE9 i'm sure FF4 will lose to IE9 as well.

Even running more memory and a separate process to "safely" contain plugins doesn't help any version of firefox including 4 beta 2. Crashes consistently, loses open tabs, runs more memory than ever, and has a problem with adding to URL's somehow. Still better than IE8 and chrome for many things but that doesn't mean its good. IE is still the only one with a good strategy for NTLM passthrough on intranets.

IE9 will be the game changer and no other browser could beat it on windows if MS does it right because they can gain access to native things that no outside maker could.

joshua.barker said,

IE9 will be the game changer and no other browser could beat it on windows if MS does it right because they can gain access to native things that no outside maker could.

Companies often complain about Microsoft having inside access. But then when you investigate, it turns out that they're just not trying hard enough.

Chrome showed that you don't have to be Microsoft to do things like Protected Mode and separate processes. It's a very telling difference in attitude, compared to Firefox/Safari/Opera.

joshua.barker said,
IE9 will be the game changer and no other browser could beat it on windows if MS does it right because they can gain access to native things that no outside maker could.

Actually, no. As a monopolist Microsoft is not allowed to withhold APIs from its competitors. They use the same tools everybody else has access to to build IE9.

Erunno said,

Actually, no. As a monopolist Microsoft is not allowed to withhold APIs from its competitors. They use the same tools everybody else has access to to build IE9.

Actually, yes. Just because they can't withhold APIs doesn't mean that they don't have the inside track. They don't have to share the internal native code behind the APIs and they should be able to use that to their advantage.

Hardware graphics acceleration is a perfect example where they could optimize their code to do some things directly and minimize overhead because they know how it works whereas Mozilla and Chrome can only call into APIs. The windows team works heavily with the IE team and there is advantage that can't be beaten without rewriting part of windows.

Internet Explorer and Chrome are the only two browsers I use on the Internet at large simply due to the security policies they have in place, and I only use Chrome because of its support for latter W3C standards. Once IE9 beta is out, I'll most likely ditch Chrome altogether.

I have to say that I am actually surprised at the OP and that statcounter doesn't correlate its findings. The last ten weeks show that blip a month ago but other than that, the trends are as they were.

http://gs.statcounter.com/#browser-ww-weekly-201021-201030

Edit: OK - I then looked at the North America instead of worldwide and IE is indeed surging up!

90% of people using computers use the default browser. They don't care or even know about other browsers - unless a friend show them a better alternative. That's why IE still have such a large share. It doesn't matter IE is a stagnant old p.o.s. It's there from the start.

Frankenchrist said,
90% of people using computers use the default browser. They don't care or even know about other browsers - unless a friend show them a better alternative. That's why IE still have such a large share. It doesn't matter IE is a stagnant old p.o.s. It's there from the start.

Do you have some particular reason why you hate Microsoft (like some childhood trauma from Windows 98 ages...) or you hate them only because it's popular and you want to be "in"...

6205 said,

Do you have some particular reason why you hate Microsoft (like some childhood trauma from Windows 98 ages...) or you hate them only because it's popular and you want to be "in"...

No trauma here, and, sadly, I haven't been "in" for many years . I use windows every day, but IE is outdated and performs like its still 1999. If it floats your boat - fine. As every test shows, all major browser outperforms IE in all tests. That alone should be enough for any "computer savvy" person to take of their Microsoft Blindfold of Infallability and at least peek at the competetion. IE8 is a step forward, but, it is still crap compared to the competetion.

All those years of IE6 (2001-2006) where MS just stopped developing IE for FIVE years will be a very hard sell to overcome. They abandoned their users and as a result I switched to FF. I won't go back to IE unless it performs better than Chrome or Firefox. There's no reason to.

This is so strange , and shows that people actually do not need that much of speed provided by chrome and opera (and safari?). Its so hard to understand what ppl want , and why only ppl , even i can never get why i keep changing my browser (even os) every now and then

IE gets the job done for me.Don't need the bells and whistles of other browsers.Though the only other browser which I have installed recently is Safari which is used rarely.I might as well delete it soon.

In terms of page loading speed, IE is slower than some of its competitors.But It's not a big deal anyways with broadband connections we have today.Of course I'm glad they are working on making it more speedy in the next version of IE.

Username.ToString(); said,
IE gets the job done for me.Don't need the bells and whistles of other browsers.Though the only other browser which I have installed recently is Safari which is used rarely.I might as well delete it soon.

In terms of page loading speed, IE is slower than some of its competitors.But It's not a big deal anyways with broadband connections we have today.Of course I'm glad they are working on making it more speedy in the next version of IE.

Here's one problem that every version of Firefox (3.6.x, 4.0 betas, and even the Minefield nightlies) *all* suffer from; poor performance in pages using lots of Flash (especially Facebook). Even with the Flash plug-in up-to-date, IE 8 just plain waxes the Fox in terms of Flash 10 performance on Facebook. And before you even *think* of trotting out that Flash isn't native on Firefox, let me remind you that Flash isn't native to IE/Trident, either. And with that being the case, I would certainly think that the poor performance is repeated on other Flash-heavy sites (including YouTube and eBay). The future may be based around HTML5 and WebM; however, the present of the Web today i still Flash-based, And when it comes to Flash performance, the choice remains IE.

If you look at that same report, Mac OS X market share shrunk. If Safari went up then did we see the start of the iPad's eating at OS X market share?

rrode74 said,
If you look at that same report, Mac OS X market share shrunk. If Safari went up then did we see the start of the iPad's eating at OS X market share?

It could be an increase in the number of web developers who are installing Safari for Windows to test pages for iPhones (???). Doesn't Apple use the same rendering engine in all versions of Safari?

In the end, it all comes down to bandwidth. Doesn't matter how fast your browser can load if you're not getting the bits.

Nagamasa said,
In the end, it all comes down to bandwidth. Doesn't matter how fast your browser can load if you're not getting the bits.

Also browser performance is reaching a point where there's no discernable difference between them under normal usage conditions (at least once IE9 is released).

I hope IE 9 will live up to the hype because even if IE7 and IE8 are faster than IE6 they are still considerably slower than Opera and even slower than the more and more sluginsh Firefox when you try to load big pages.

We have an internal app where users can display all search results at once (limited to 10 000 results) and it's really slow under IE 8. Scrolling this page is a pain in the *** using IE 8 while it's uber smooth using Opera.

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