Infographic: You are not safe online

Chances are if you are reading this, that you're pretty clued in on all things Internet already. I mean you didn't find us without a search or recommendation and you're probably interested in tech news. But for many casual users, what you might not know is that companies aren't always golden when it comes to your privacy, and in many cases, as long as you don't go looking for the setting to opt-out, block or check "advanced settings" in a website or program, those companies will willingly collect your data.

Below we have an infographic of typical examples that everyday users will come up against, sent in to us by Compliance and Safety LLC.

Of course there are ways you can protect yourself by simply educating yourself about the websites and programs you use. Simply diving into the options can already do the trick. Whatever you do, don't rely on most companies to do this for you.

If you're concerned about websites or programs that you use or just want some advice, check out our Internet, Network & Security forum for some helpful feedback by our awesome members.

Source: Compliance and Safety LLC

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I'm pretty sure an 8 character password with one capital letter can be cracked in minutes let alone 200 years!

Jedimark said,
I'm pretty sure an 8 character password with one capital letter can be cracked in minutes let alone 200 years!

or 4 characters (such PIN code) with 9 retries (or less).

These days a decent network firewall/content filter is as important as av, Glad ive blocked all this junk with TMG 2010 but more of these tracking/trends companies startup every day.

If thats not bad enough the social networks track you even if you dont use them practically every website even this one has +1 buttons plastered everywhere

http://upit.cc/i/f6b3f3a4.png

Block them all

Apple have allowed iPhone apps to access your address book since 2006? That's impressive considering the iPhone came out in 2007, and the App Store in 2008.

JamesWeb said,
Apple have allowed iPhone apps to access your address book since 2006? That's impressive considering the iPhone came out in 2007, and the App Store in 2008.

hahaha yep they screwed that up

JamesWeb said,
Apple have allowed iPhone apps to access your address book since 2006? That's impressive considering the iPhone came out in 2007, and the App Store in 2008.
Apple invented time. S*** came out when they say it came out. '06, '01, '07 - doesn't matter. You're doing chronological order wrong.

Terrible ****ing infographic, 200 years with 8 characters and 1 capital? That's doable on a gamers PC in a weekend and it isn't even sourced.

I was tempted to stop reading when you implied that sharing of advertising material makes up for 100% of all identity theft cases but your password logic sealed the deal.

FUD like this is WHY internet privacy and security is as bad as it is--arrogant individuals who think they know better spread misinformation.

ascendant123 said,
Terrible ****ing infographic, 200 years with 8 characters and 1 capital? That's doable on a gamers PC in a weekend and it isn't even sourced.

I was tempted to stop reading when you implied that sharing of advertising material makes up for 100% of all identity theft cases but your password logic sealed the deal.

FUD like this is WHY internet privacy and security is as bad as it is--arrogant individuals who think they know better spread misinformation.

n_K said,
2 hours to crack an 8 letter lowercase password but 200 year to crack an 8 letter password with one uppercase letter?

I don't think I've read such **** in my entire life.

You're 100% right, with the right hardware an 8 characters password (with any number of capitals, numbers and symbols) can be cracked in less than 12 hours

This $12,000 computer, dubbed Project Erebus v2.5 by creator d3ad0ne, contains eight AMD Radeon HD7970 GPU cards. Running version 0.10 of oclHashcat-lite, it requires just 12 hours to brute force the entire keyspace for any eight-character password containing upper- or lower-case letters, digits or symbols. It aided Team Hashcat in winning this year's Crack Me If You Can contest.
http://arstechnica.com/securit...08/passwords-under-assault/

2 hours to crack an 8 letter lowercase password but 200 year to crack an 8 letter password with one uppercase letter?

I don't think I've read such **** in my entire life.

n_K said,
2 hours to crack an 8 letter lowercase password but 200 year to crack an 8 letter password with one uppercase letter?

I don't think I've read such **** in my entire life.

You're 100% right, with the right hardware an 8 characters password (with any number of capitals, numbers and symbols) can be cracked in less than 12 hours

This $12,000 computer, dubbed Project Erebus v2.5 by creator d3ad0ne, contains eight AMD Radeon HD7970 GPU cards. Running version 0.10 of oclHashcat-lite, it requires just 12 hours to brute force the entire keyspace for any eight-character password containing upper- or lower-case letters, digits or symbols. It aided Team Hashcat in winning this year's Crack Me If You Can contest.
http://arstechnica.com/securit...08/passwords-under-assault/

Rudy said,
You're 100% right, with the right hardware an 8 characters password (with any number of capitals, numbers and symbols) can be cracked in less than 12 hours

http://arstechnica.com/securit...08/passwords-under-assault/

Just out of curiosity; how many people have a $12,000 computer lying around waiting to crack s***? Furthermore, not all logins can be brute forced. A lot of logins will lock you out after X amount of failed attempts. Of course there are still quite a few that don't lock you out either.

Any real hacker worth their salt won't go out and splurge on a $12,000 computer meant for only cracking passwords. Why? They're fully aware of things like social engineering, standing behind you, or simply guessing that most peoples passwords are password, pizza, 'birthday', or some other very common thing which only requires a little social engineering.

In most cases, people unknowingly provided or directly provided their password or even bank PIN to a hacker. Facebook is a great place to start.

I gave up trying to control directly unsolicited spam years ago. We all know this happens and there's sweet fu*k-all we can do about it..

Nashy said,
According to the sources, these amazing uni students just lifted data from other people's research.

So you'd rather they pulled some numbers out of their rear's and put them in a graphic?

jamieakers said,

So you'd rather they pulled some numbers out of their rear's and put them in a graphic?

That's probably where the original numbers came from anyway.