Intel: "All day" notebook battery use coming in 2013

Intel is continuing to push for PC makers to use its Ultrabook design for upcoming thin and light notebooks. Thisismynext.com reports that during today's keynote speech at the Intel Developer Forum, the company's CEO Paul Otellini told the crowd that Intel has a number of upcoming chips that will offer lower power usage while at the same time increasing their processor speed.

In 2012, Intel plans to release processors that go by the code name Ivy Bridge. Compared to the current Sandy Bridge family of processors, which has a 32nm production design, Ivy Bridge chips are being built with the 22nm design in mind. That should allow the processors to have a much lower power consumption.

In addition, Intel claims that its Tri-Gate technology will allow for Ivy Bridge chips to be made for different case sizes and designs. Otellini said that production of the Ivy Bridge processors will actually begin in the fourth quarter of 2011. The article speculates that the CES 2012 trade show in January will see the first products with the Ivy Bridge family of chips inside shown off by notebook companies.

The next big processor leap by Intel will come in 2013 when it plans to release processors with the code named Haswell. The Register reports that according to Otellini, notebooks that have Haswell inside will use power at just one twentieth the amount of current processors. Intel predicts that such notebooks would have a battery life that would last "all day" with continued use (it's not clear exactly what "all day" really means) and will have 10 days of standby power.

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11 Comments

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ApuBo said,
I guess it will about same/lower performance as current atoms?

Why? The Sandy Bridge equipped Macbook Airs beat most Atom based netbooks (their battery is larger though but we are moving towards "ultrabooks" with similar size and innards), doesn't have to be weak to be low powered specially not with CPU technology constantly moving forward.

yxz said,
"Intel promises '20X' power reduction with 'Haswell' chips"
W.T.F.

Let's theorize.

Maybe '20X' is a code name or brand for some new power saving technology, because 1/20th power usage seems unfeasible.

Reacon said,

Let's theorize.

Maybe '20X' is a code name or brand for some new power saving technology, because 1/20th power usage seems unfeasible.

Keep in mind that it's only the processor they're about. If they don't also lower the power of the screen and the graphics chip and everything else, it's not going to make a big difference.

Reacon said,

Let's theorize.

Maybe '20X' is a code name or brand for some new power saving technology, because 1/20th power usage seems unfeasible.

Some people are telling that those news are a bit misleading, that 20x reduction is in standby/"connected standby" mode.

david13lt said,

Some people are telling that those news are a bit misleading, that 20x reduction is in standby/"connected standby" mode.


Hmmm... It all sure seems odd... They claim the cpu take twenty times less power and will last a whole day (with screens and all), however, they brag about 10 days standby which seams rather week considering a Macbook Air with Sandy Bridge have up to 30 days standby (an it likely comes very close to that number in reality)...
Shouldn't it go longer in standby? hmm