Intel chips go 3D with 22nm Tri-Gate transistor technology

Transistors. You won't find a single piece of electronics without them today. If you look at the processors in computers and mobile devices, they've all managed to continue to shrink, year by year, using more transistors in a smaller area and are also using less power and giving off less heat. Doubling the amount of components used on integrated circuits every year, or now two years, was what Gordon Moore had in mind back in 1965.

However, the Intel co-founder probably thought that at some point, there had to be some realistic upper limit. We've gone from transistors that were the size of large light bulbs to being only 33 nanometers wide in Intel's second-generation Core chips. To go smaller than 32 nm would require a new way away from manufacturing transistors on a flat two-dimensional planar surface.

Fortunately for Moore, he could trust his company to take transistor technology to the next level. Make it 3D! And so Intel has introduced the world's first processors to take advantage of 3D transistors, which they named "Tri-Gate." Sample chips have been already produced and demonstrated in Intel's labs. This new technology will be introduced next year on Intel's 22 nm "Ivy Bridge" processors.

For those who need a further explanation of what this use of "3D" really means (definitely nothing to do with graphics), Intel has produced an entertaining video, which may be seen below (courtesy of Engadget).

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15 Comments

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Another market-speak name. Tri-gate is misleading. I'm sure its a huge achievement in manufacturing, but tri-gate sorta implies three gates. This technology should allow for faster switching of each transistor than would be possible without it. However, you're still going to be limited by all other limiters of processing speed in a cpu (power, heat, latency, programming models. etc). I'm sure the Ivy Bridge will be a great CPU, but at least wait until there's some sort of benchmark before you say its game over.

I read about this concept that was in the development stages a while ago in a PC mag I read. Really impressed to see it's now developed.

Ah, look at that first picture. Intel are using the time tested trick of using sex to sell their products.

_DP said,
Ah, look at that first picture. Intel are using the time tested trick of using sex to sell their products.

My first thought was the "Pat" skit from SNL

The video reminds me about the scene in Jurassic Park where they all get strapped into watch a short movie on dna

This is gonna be interesting. 32nm AMD Bulldozer vs. Intel 22nm Tri-Gate Transistors technology. Both looking promising. Would be nice if AMD would do the same.

david13lt said,
This is gonna be interesting. 32nm AMD Bulldozer vs. Intel 22nm Tri-Gate Transistors technology. Both looking promising. Would be nice if AMD would do the same.

It won't even be a fight, this is a whole new kind of transistor... I doubt that AMD has anything to match it with.

david13lt said,
This is gonna be interesting. 32nm AMD Bulldozer vs. Intel 22nm Tri-Gate Transistors technology. Both looking promising. Would be nice if AMD would do the same.
Allow me to sum it up succinctly for you:

Intel > AMD

For the foreseeable future.