Intel launches a pair of new quad-core chips

In San Jose, California, at the Embedded Systems Conference, Intel launched two quad-core processors for high performance embedded applications, aimed at designers of telecommunications infrastructure, network storage systems and medical imaging equipment. The E5335 and E5345 are both members of Intel's Clovertown Quad-core Xeon family, offering 8MB of cache and a 1,333MHz front side bus. Intel's new E5300-series chips will come in at the top of the company's range of embedded processors, above embedded versions of its mainstream chips like Core 2 Duo, Pentium, and Celeron. Intel is selling the 2.0GHz E5335 and the 2.33GHz E5345 for $690 per chip in quantities of 1,000.

The powerful 80-watt chips may seem like overkill for embedded platforms, admitted Doug Davis, vice president and general manager of Intel's embedded and communications group. But a typical Computed tomography scan image is 16GB, so users handling many images or running analytical processing can easily use the quad-core chip's full potential. As well, high-end embedded platforms like the Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture blade typically offer a 200-watt total envelope, which is enough power to support an E5300-series chip along with chipset, memory, and other peripherals, Davis said.

News source: InfoWorld

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bluarash... you know what they say... if you want something done right you gotta do it yourself.... sounds like you better get goin

I am sorry but this is utterly pointless (two CPUs has benefits, eight or even four is overkill for most users). This is a niche market (and Intel knows this). The real problem with both AMD and Intel is that they can not move beyond 3GHz for obvious engineering constraints (die size and heat issues). They are making up for it by creating multiple CPU chips and lowering the power consumption. I can foresee a day in which my notebook has sixteen cores (big deal).

What I want to see is real innovation. How about a new chip design. The Core 2 Duo is almost a year old (and getting a little long in the tooth). Intel and AMD need to produce more radical designs instead of relying on the average design of the Pentium III (well at least it is better than NetBurst architecture). Both companies need to go back to formulation and create CPU(s) with multiple cores that push the 10GHz barrier (at least five). They also need to employee more of the RISC architecture.

Further, what this industry needs is real innovation. Cheap, solid state storage of 250gigs would be nice. I am sick and tired of boring, practical technology like hybrid hard drives. At the very least how about hybrid disks with a 16gig buffer spinning at 15000rpm for around $300. This would eliminate a major bottle neck in the current computer design.

Uh yeah, the article pretty much already said it's a niche market. "aimed at designers of telecommunications infrastructure, network storage systems and medical imaging equipment." No one ever denied that.

What I want to see is real innovation. How about a new chip design. The Core 2 Duo is almost a year old

Wow almost a year, that's almost as old as the 80286! Sorry but if the Core 2 wasn't innovation I don't know what is.

TRC said,
Uh yeah, the article pretty much already said it's a niche market. "aimed at designers of telecommunications infrastructure, network storage systems and medical imaging equipment." No one ever denied that.

Wow almost a year, that's almost as old as the 80286! Sorry but if the Core 2 wasn't innovation I don't know what is.

I think that the 486 to Pentium II gap (of course that was multiple processors between them, one really). The Pentium Pro was a massive improvement over the 486 (DX2 or DX4) and Pentium (with or without MMX).

bluarash said,
The real problem with both AMD and Intel is that they can not move beyond 3GHz for obvious engineering constraints (die size and heat issues). They are making up for it by creating multiple CPU chips and lowering the power consumption. I can foresee a day in which my notebook has sixteen cores (big deal).

Both companies have or have produced chips that are over 3GHz. My system @ stock speeds hits 3.2GHz.

The Core 2 Duo is almost a year old (and getting a little long in the tooth).

The Core series is a heavily redesigned Pentium M which was derived from the PIII. Technically speaking it's more than a year old. However it is a badass chip. I'm an AMD man myself and even I can't deny it.

Further, what this industry needs is real innovation. Cheap, solid state storage of 250gigs would be nice. I am sick and tired of boring, practical technology like hybrid hard drives. At the very least how about hybrid disks with a 16gig buffer spinning at 15000rpm for around $300. This would eliminate a major bottle neck in the current computer design.

If a 250 gig solid state drive were to be released tomorrow I highly doubt it would be cheap. If you want better HD performance right now then get a SCSI card & drive. The computer industry moves fast but not so fast that you can wish for these things and have them magically appear.

And, as expected (since they slipped up on the store site a while back), Apple has released an 8-core version of the Mac Pro using these chips!

http://www.apple.com/macpro/

edit: well, it appears that they aren't using these specific chips, since they are using a 3Ghz quad-core Xeon.