Intel reveals new Windows 8-based processors at CES 2013

Intel may be the biggest company that's exhibiting at CES 2013 this week that has a direct relationship with Microsoft in terms of its Windows 8 support. Today, the company held a press conference in Las Vegas where it announced a number of new processors made for Windows PCs.

Intel's press release offers up the details of its CES reveals, which includes a new 22nm Atom chip, code name "Bay Trail", that will be the successor to the "Clover Trail" processor that launched in several Windows 8 tablets in 2012. Intel said:

The first quad-core Atom SoC will be the most powerful Atom processor to date, delivering more than two times the computing performance of Intel's current generation tablet offering. It will also include new improved integrated security offerings. These improvements will enable new experiences for business and personal use in devices as thin as 8mm that have all-day battery life and weeks of standby, all at lower prices.

"Bay Trail" chips will become available in Windows 8 tablets sometime in late 2013. Engadget also reports that during Intel's press conference, the company said it would release an improved version of Clover Trail chips that would have better battery life and performance, but details were not announced.

Intel also announced the fourth generation of its main Core processors, which will cut down its power use to just 7 watts, versus 15 watts for current Core chips. Intel says these new Core processors will enable Ultrabook-based notebooks to have as much as nine hours of battery life. It will be used inside Lenovo's upcoming Yoga 11S notebook and an upcoming and unnamed Acer notebook, among other products. They should start to become available to the public later this spring.

Source: Intel | Image via Intel

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"Intel also announced the fourth generation of its main Core processors, which will cut down its power use to just 7 watts, versus 15 watts for current Core chips. Intel says these new Core processors will enable Ultrabook-based notebooks to have as much as nine hours of battery life. It will be used inside Lenovo's upcoming Yoga 11S notebook and an upcoming and unnamed Acer notebook, among other products. They should start to become available to the public later this spring."

This is actually incorrect.

Intel announced low power 3rd gen processors, ie. low power Ivy Bridge. This will power the Yoga11S and the Acer notebook. Processors are available 'now' and should start to appear in manufacturers' products soon.

They then demonstrated the upcoming 4th gen processors, ie. Haswell, in the 'North Cape' ultrabook reference design.

The 4th gen processors were announced last year...

what does "Windows 8-based" mean exactly for a processor? Are you saying that these can't run other operating systems? Do you know what you are talking about? Me thinks not.

RichardK said,
what does "Windows 8-based" mean exactly for a processor? Are you saying that these can't run other operating systems? Do you know what you are talking about? Me thinks not.

Optimized for technology that IS ONLY AVAILABLE in Windows 8.

I know the world doesn't still get this, even though Vista was released over six years ago. There are GPU handling and power handling technologies in Windows Vista/7/8 that DO NOT exist in any other OS technology.

Windows 8 expands on these features with advances and more scheduling control for the GPU and integrated CPU/GPU systems, being able to throw GPU threads through an extra CPU core for example if it would be faster than waiting on the GPU.

There is a rather LONG LIST of technologies that hardware makers are targeting that just won't work or run on an OS like Android/Linux, or OS X.

So these CPU technologies will work with another OS like Linux or an older version of Windows. However the 'new' technologies in the CPU is not turned on or able to be utilized.

This isn't an anti- otherOS move. For Linux to support some of the GPU virtualization/scheduling or power technologies, it would literally take a complete redesign of the core Linux kernel - with little resemblance to what Linux looks like today. The same is true of OSX.

except MS also have pantent-ing said technology,
so whenever other non-MS OS tries to use it, they must pay licensee fee to MS or face a legal battle,.

I would rather they just release baytrail sooner, the atom already wins hands down in the battery life department, baytrail with that battery life + 1080p displays will be the shiz.

Intel's processors where metro way before metro was "cool"..... just look at their dies... all squares and rectangles...

Sounds impressive but imo, they need to ditch the atom name. It's a great name but it has fairly bad connotations due to their poor performance up until recently. I'm surprised they still use the celeron tag!

the thing is the average user doesn't know what atom is, nor do they have any negative connotations with it, same with celeron.

I don't think Atom has gotten that much better. I demoed a Samsung Ativ tablet with the new Atom and it struggled to open system properties without lagging. I can't imagine trying to do something productive with it.

Maybe it was that particular tablet, but it left another bad taste in my mouth. Hopefully this new generation will be better.

Thats strange, I have an Acer Iconia w510 which has an intel clovertrail Atom CPU and it does not lag period. I can open word, excel, internet explorer etc with no lag. More than likely samsung has poor driver support.

Jimmy422 said,
I don't think Atom has gotten that much better. I demoed a Samsung Ativ tablet with the new Atom and it struggled to open system properties without lagging. I can't imagine trying to do something productive with it.

Maybe it was that particular tablet, but it left another bad taste in my mouth. Hopefully this new generation will be better.

Their current clovertrail CPUs are faster and just as low or better power consumption when compared to Qualcomm Krait and Tegra 3.

Jimmy422 said,
I don't think Atom has gotten that much better. I demoed a Samsung Ativ tablet with the new Atom and it struggled to open system properties without lagging. I can't imagine trying to do something productive with it.

Maybe it was that particular tablet, but it left another bad taste in my mouth. Hopefully this new generation will be better.

uhh,even a netbook from years ago wont do that,so obviously something was going on there for that to happen,like someone having something run in the background eating all the cpu cycles.

And just so you know, the clover trail atom has better speed to power consumption ratio than any ARM chip on the market today(tegra3,krait,exynos).

micro said,
Thats strange, I have an Acer Iconia w510 which has an intel clovertrail Atom CPU and it does not lag period. I can open word, excel, internet explorer etc with no lag. More than likely samsung has poor driver support.

I have one answer for you: Superfetch.

The same happened with my netbook. Windows 8 was slower than Windows 7. Gave it a couple of weeks and the fetch just did the job. It's performing as good with Windows 7, and that is with Aero activated. Something that I needed to disable on Win 7 for the netbook to "cough less"

Jimmy422 said,
I don't think Atom has gotten that much better. I demoed a Samsung Ativ tablet with the new Atom and it struggled to open system properties without lagging. I can't imagine trying to do something productive with it.

Maybe it was that particular tablet, but it left another bad taste in my mouth. Hopefully this new generation will be better.

I think your impressions have been polluted a bit.

Let's start with Atom in general.

The original series of Atom CPUs found in 2006/2007 that people commonly were exposed to was the N270. This was a hyperthreading single core CPU and at the time felt slow in Netbooks with limited RAM.

The 'problem' was the low RAM and the integrated GPU being CPU bound, putting extra work on the Atom.

In actual performance, the Atom N270 is in the same range as the 3.4-3.6ghz P4 CPUs. Which at the time was NOT considered to be a horribly slow CPU. We were still buying P4 notebooks in 2005/2006.

In comparison to ARM based computing performance, even the older Atom N270 outperforms most ARM CPUs.

The newer Atom based systems are only slow if poorly configured or filled with bloatware.

Jose_49 said,

I have one answer for you: Superfetch.

The same happened with my netbook. Windows 8 was slower than Windows 7. Gave it a couple of weeks and the fetch just did the job. It's performing as good with Windows 7, and that is with Aero activated. Something that I needed to disable on Win 7 for the netbook to "cough less"

It is more than SuperFetch.

Also something to note, Windows 7 with Aero on, and transparency turned OFF, you will find even the oldest Netbook will perform better than using the non DWM(Composer assisted) 'Basic' or 'Classic' modes.

If Atom had a stronger GPU offering the need to turn off Transparency would not be needed or show a measurable difference.

So even on a N270 Atom based netbook, Aero with transparency turned off is the fastest video mode. It goes beyond just desktop UI apps and elements, and will provide higher FPS for most video formats.

Windows 8 is faster than Windows 7 on all Netbooks, even the slowest Netbooks from 2006 with 1Gb of RAM. Windows 8 has no way to disable the DWM/Aero (There is no longer a shader based transparency option) and it also has better CPU assistance when integrated GPUs are overwhelmed due to the WDDM and NT technology that virtualizes and schedules GPU processes/threads.

Jimmy422 said,
I don't think Atom has gotten that much better. I demoed a Samsung Ativ tablet with the new Atom and it struggled to open system properties without lagging. I can't imagine trying to do something productive with it.

Maybe it was that particular tablet, but it left another bad taste in my mouth. Hopefully this new generation will be better.

I own one of these, it's brilliant for what I want to use it for, browse the web and stream videos with netflix.

I can't really multitask beyond chatting ,surfing and listening to music on it, and any webpage with big amounts of flash is a pain without noscript/etc.

I also can't do programming or photo editing on it, since the 2 GB of ram is very limiting.

What I can do is connect it to the included keyboard dock and connect to my workplace through VPN and remote desktop, or even other solutions like VNC and Teamviewer/LogMeIn. It works just like you would expect it, and is lightyears ahead of anything I've experienced from my iPad.

Bottom line, the iPad is still my goto pad when it comes to telling people what to buy, but for what it is (a really barebone laptop with touch display) the Samsung Ativ (with Atom and Windows x86) is a great piece of hardware.