Intel: Windows 8 makes picking either a tablet or a PC unnecessary

On Thursday, Intel revealed its financial numbers for the fourth quarter of 2012. While the figures beat previous estimates, Intel's revenues and profits were still lower than they were for the same period a year ago.

However, current Intel CEO Paul Otellini still feels that working with Microsoft and third party PC makers on new PC convertible designs (such as the Dell XPS 12, shown above) will help Intel in the long run to fight off the rise of tablet-only products such as the iPad and Kindle Fire. CNet.com reports that during Intel's Q&A with financial analysts on Thursday, he stated:

We are in the midst of a radical transformation of the computing experience with the blurring of form factors and adoption of new user interfaces. It's no longer necessary to choose between a PC and a tablet. Convertibles and detachables combined with Windows 8 and touch provide a 2-for-1, no-compromise computing experience.

And what about competition from ARM-based processors such as the ones from NVIDIA and Qualcomm that are being used in a few Windows RT tablets such as the Surface. Otellini seems to be unimpressed so far, claiming that Intel's upcoming "Bay Trail" and "Clover Trail+" chips will perform better than ARM-based designs. He added, "These devices are simply becoming very small computers, and that's what Intel is exceptional at."

Source: CNet.com | Image via Dell

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Unnecessary? Hardly. If one wants a tablet, get a tablet with Windows-8. If one wants a laptop, get a laptop with Windows-7. They are two totally different form factors for two totally different uses. Creating a hybrid ends up being a compromise, by definition. So...buy what works best for your needs.

TsarNikky said,
Unnecessary? Hardly. If one wants a tablet, get a tablet with Windows-8. If one wants a laptop, get a laptop with Windows-7. They are two totally different form factors for two totally different uses. Creating a hybrid ends up being a compromise, by definition. So...buy what works best for your needs.

But this is why your argument is specious at best. With Windows 8, you do not lose any Windows 7 functionality, yet you gain a lot of touch and opportunity for new touch Apps that Windows 7 cannot use.

So even if you had the two devices, you would find yourself hating Windows 7, when you wanted to run the easy to use/navigate version of Netflix that is available on Windows 8, and this list of Apps that you lose when you go back to Windows 7 is continually growing.

As for an argument that you lose features form Win7 to Win8 - Just add a toolbar to the Taskbar for your Programs Folder, heck even your favorites, and treat the Start Screen just like the Start Menu.

There is no loss in functionality unless you cannot make the jump in thinking.

thenetavenger said,

when you wanted to run the easy to use/navigate version of Netflix that is available on Windows 8,

On a tangent, you could also run the easy to use Hulu Plus app on Windows 8, rage quit at all the content you aren't allowed to view, press Win+D and open the exact same service in a browser window and have no trouble.

FIGURE IT OUT, HULU.

Out of curiosity: what do you think that replacing a laptop with a Convertible Tablet would be miss?
I switch to the latter in 2002 and I have not missed the former at all.
I am just waiting to see if Lenovo will launch a new ThinkPad Convertible to replace my ancient Toshiba M400.

Not strictly true. At least so far these kind of computers have been too small to be a PC, or too large to be a tablet. IMO, a 15" screen is far too small to work on, and far too big to be a tablet.

Windows hybrids have HDMI or display ports to connect to a second monitor. Secondary monitor support is fantastic in Windows 8. Monitor size is no problem for Windows like it is for limited purpose tablets like iPad or Kindle.

This has been true since 2002 and the introduction of the TabletPC edition of XP.

Sadly forces inside Microsoft didn't help this progression.

Additionally, to this day a majority of IT professionals are CLUELESS when it comes to configuring the desktop UI for an optimal touch/Stylus experience.

What? No amount of configuration will help turn what is inherently a touch unfriendly experience into a touch friendly experience - that's why the paradigm shift to something like Metro is so needed. The hybrid OS (such as Windows 8, without commenting on whether it really succeeds) is needed because hybrid machines are going to become the over-riding form-factor. I think from a strategy perspective Microsoft have now got it right, even though as you say that could have happened years ago.

thenetavenger said,
Additionally, to this day a majority of IT professionals are CLUELESS when it comes to configuring the desktop UI for an optimal touch/Stylus experience.

Indeed, someone needs to get a clue!

A desktop is NOT designed (or suitable) to be used for touch/stylus

.fahim said,
What? No amount of configuration will help turn what is inherently a touch unfriendly experience into a touch friendly experience

Actually, I've seen thenetavenger bring this point up before in the past. He backs it up pretty well, in a way that makes a lot of sense. There's a lot more hiding in Windows 7 that was kept under wraps than most people are aware of, especially when it comes to the touch-enabled PC.

I won't go digging up his past posts--I imagine he's probably already on it.

thenetavenger said,
This has been true since 2002 and the introduction of the TabletPC edition of XP.

Sadly forces inside Microsoft didn't help this progression.

Additionally, to this day a majority of IT professionals are CLUELESS when it comes to configuring the desktop UI for an optimal touch/Stylus experience.

It is clear you have ignored what the original price point of said devices were. The software was kind of there but what killed it was the fact that the hardware simply wasn't there.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

It is clear you have ignored what the original price point of said devices were. The software was kind of there but what killed it was the fact that the hardware simply wasn't there.

The hardware was there, it just wasn't inexpensive, and the lack of understanding and promotion of TabletPC features by Microsoft Office's team and OEM partners didn't help the adoption of the technology, hardware or not.

There were a lot of IT departments that did get the concept, and that is where you see the large chunks of TabletPC sales and deployments in sales and other non desktop related industries.

Apple was smart about the iPhone and iPad, as they waited around until screen technology for each device was dirt cheap. They also helped this process by NOT using a digitizer class screen and got away with lower quality touch only that would have been worthless for TabletPC that offered precision.

.fahim said,
What? No amount of configuration will help turn what is inherently a touch unfriendly experience into a touch friendly experience - that's why the paradigm shift to something like Metro is so needed. The hybrid OS (such as Windows 8, without commenting on whether it really succeeds) is needed because hybrid machines are going to become the over-riding form-factor. I think from a strategy perspective Microsoft have now got it right, even though as you say that could have happened years ago.

Yet I could take 5 minutes, and demonstrate it is possible, even mimicking an iPad like experience using just the built in functionality.

This doesn't even include the features from Windows 7 that were removed and not enabled by Sinofsky that also killed the TabletPC features from Office.

I'll give you the basic place to start to make the Windows 7 Desktop touch friendly.
Open a Folder
Turn on Large Icons
Folder Settings
- General - Single click to open an item
- View - Apply to All folders (this makes the Large Icons Stick)
- View - Advanced - Use Check boxes to select items

Now go to the personalization, and Color Settings, Click Advanced
This is where you customize and change the Metrics for EVERY Windows 7 UI element.

Start with making the Title Bar Large enough to be touched, expand out the borders to be touch friendly, Increase the Menu Size to touch friendly, Increase the Scroll bar to be a touch size. (Keep doing this until you can easily touch everything easily.

Now step back and play with Explorer, and notice how it feels a bit like an iPad with the icon views and interaction with items in the folders. Also note the 'checkbox' feature that was designed for touch works well, and reminds you of the photo Gallery form Android.

Enjoy a fully touch friendly Windows 7 PC.

You might miss the point here: the original concept behind the "Tablet" project was the handwriting capability of the OS and that was indeed delivered even in its first iteration: XP Tablet OS. Admittedly the experience was rough to some degrees but nevertheless it worked from day one. Vista and then W7 improved things tremendously up to where we are now.
As Thenetavenger correctly stated the project biggest sponsor was, and I would add thanks God otherwise it might have never been launched, Bill Gates who envisioned a device to be used as a digital notepad as well as a laptop. Granted initially the idea did not gain a lot of support mostly because, and being one of those who ditched my regular laptop for a ConvertibleTablet I speak by direct experience, the hardware was both inadequate and way overpriced. In the following years things improved but even MS itself, again thanks to fifth column very active inside the company, failed to properly presents and highlights the advantages of such device compared to a regular laptop. Along came Apple which launched a device that was, IMO improperly, called aTablet; improperly because it lacked the most important feature of a Tablet: handwriting capabilities. Personally I have always seen iPad and clones more as an evolution of another MS project: Mira or Smart displays than a true Tablet.
Nowadays there is a lot of emphasis on the "Touch" which is unquestionably an added, convenient feature but nothing revolutionary: plenty of restaurants had touch screens in 1990....
If I have to work on a spreadsheet, write something, put down an idea, a concept or other task I would use a pen or pencil to do it, not my finger.
Of course if I was to be seated on my couch browsing pictures or playing Angry birds I would enjoy and appreciate a touch enabled screen.

thenetavenger said,

Yet I could take 5 minutes, and demonstrate it is possible, even mimicking an iPad like experience using just the built in functionality.

This doesn't even include the features from Windows 7 that were removed and not enabled by Sinofsky that also killed the TabletPC features from Office.

I'll give you the basic place to start to make the Windows 7 Desktop touch friendly.
Open a Folder
Turn on Large Icons
Folder Settings
- General - Single click to open an item
- View - Apply to All folders (this makes the Large Icons Stick)
- View - Advanced - Use Check boxes to select items

Now go to the personalization, and Color Settings, Click Advanced
This is where you customize and change the Metrics for EVERY Windows 7 UI element.

Start with making the Title Bar Large enough to be touched, expand out the borders to be touch friendly, Increase the Menu Size to touch friendly, Increase the Scroll bar to be a touch size. (Keep doing this until you can easily touch everything easily.

Now step back and play with Explorer, and notice how it feels a bit like an iPad with the icon views and interaction with items in the folders. Also note the 'checkbox' feature that was designed for touch works well, and reminds you of the photo Gallery form Android.

Enjoy a fully touch friendly Windows 7 PC.

If that is your definition of Touch Friendly, then you clearly have low standards. This makes it more Touch Palatable and far from Touch Friendly.