Internet Explorer browser market share goes down in June

Microsoft's Internet Explorer web browser continues to lose overall market share in the great browser wars, especially to Google's Chrome browser. Net Application's latest survey of web browser usage show that Internet Explorer dropped from 54.3 percent in May to 53.7 percent in June. By contrast, Google's Chrome browser jumped up from 12.5 percent in May to 13.1 percent in June to settle in third place. The Firefox browser from Mozilla was in second place but stayed at 21.7 percent in June, the same percentage it had in May.

Apple's Safari browser was in fourth place in the survey as its market share went up slightly from 7.3 percent in May to 7.5 percent in June. Fifth place went to the Opera browser, but its market share went down from 2 percent in May to 1.7 percent in June.

As far as individual versions of web browsers, Internet Explorer 9's market share went up slightly from 4.2 percent in May to 5.7 percent in June. The browser, which was first launched last March, cannot be run on Microsoft's Windows XP which is still used by a large number of PCs around the world.

In a post on Microsoft's official blog site, the company's head of Internet Explorer's marketing, Roger Capriotti, stated that Internet Explorer 9's usage on Windows 7 based PCs is surging up, stating, "IE9 has now become the most popular modern browser on Windows 7 in the US. IE9 is now just second overall in the US behind IE8 with 21.8% usage share as of the last day of June. Worldwide, IE9 usage share on Windows 7 is exiting the month with 17.0% usage share for June."

Mozilla officially released Firefox 5 in June and it its first official month it grabbed onto 2.1 percent of the web browser market compared to 10.5 percent for the previous version Firefox 4. One other interesting stat from Net Applications is the rise of the iPad in total web browser usage; Apple's tablet device now represents 1.03 percent of all web browser usage.

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31 Comments

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Well it's market share has been falling since forever. Good thing it's dying slowly. At least Chrome and Firefox don't force users to upgrade their OS to keep their web experience going.

xpclient said,
Well it's market share has been falling since forever. Good thing it's dying slowly. At least Chrome and Firefox don't force users to upgrade their OS to keep their web experience going.

Which is a shame, since XP is an outdated relic that shouldn't be allowed on the internet.

I use IE9 and I like it but there're things that have to be improved, like the notification system, I don't like the notification on the bottom of the window; the Download manager does the job but the interface could be a lot better.

IE9 is a pretty good browser, but I still think its marketshare comes from it being installed by default. There are other options out there, but I think most people either don't care to bother looking for alternatives when IE "just works". As long as it's the default, it will always be dominant.

bjoswald said,
but I still think its marketshare comes from it being installed by default.

+1. We all know that if IE wasn't installed by default, its marketshare would be non-existant. However that's changing fast because the younger generations actually know what a browser is, and how dire IE is compared to Firefox/Chrome/Opera.

bjoswald said,

As long as it's the default, it will always be dominant.

Again, I think its current waning dominance can be put down to:
1. Ignorance of what a browser is. The older generation mainly has this problem.
2. Installed by default. Technically, it's still a monopoly abuse. Even the European browser choice screen is running in IE. It should not be installed at all unless the user explicitly chooses it. A similar system needs to be implemented in the US and elsewhere too. DOJ, get your head out of the sand!

1 is easily ameliorated with time. 2 can be fixed by separating IE from windows completely. We all know it's possible. You don't see GNU/Linux or OS X requiring a browser to function do you? It's an artificial dependency concocted by Microsoft to gain dominance in search and web services which generate advertising income.

Funnily enough, all the people I know that match this stereotype know full well about the other browsers and actively choose IE.

Flawed said,
2. Installed by default. Technically, it's still a monopoly abuse. Even the European browser choice screen is running in IE. It should not be installed at all unless the user explicitly chooses it.

Not a fan of IE myself, but this point is a little silly at best. Pick any Linux distro, that installs a desktop environment. They all come with a default browser, be it Firefox, Iceweasel, Konquerer, etc etc. Plus Windows isn't limited to a repository, they'll need something to get their browser of choice. (Not everyone is comfortable with a command line FTP client for example.) A user can install whatever browser they want, no questions asked, and IE doesn't cripple the otehr broswers.. so there is no monopoly. It's just an out-of-the-box feature that can be used or ignored as desired. It's just as likely to say that Firefox is trying for a monopoly on the Ubuntu boxes, or to take it another absurd step, GNU freaking out about Windows Paint versus Gimp.

Im on of them that jumped. Used IE since Windows 95 and never strayed. Ive got 3 PC's that are still on XP so I couldn't get the IE9 update. I decided to move two over to FF and the other to Chrome. A few weeks later I moved my Windows 7 rig over to FF and the Chrome browser was gone as well.

srprimeaux said,
I rather enjoy IE9, but I'm hoping they pay attention to what the competition is offering and, well, compete.

Other than more support for CSS3 and HTML5 stuff, and I guess a spellchecker, what else do they offer that IE needs? Unless you really need something like extentions, but IE does have add-ons.

GP007 said,

Other than more support for CSS3 and HTML5 stuff, and I guess a spellchecker, what else do they offer that IE needs? Unless you really need something like extentions, but IE does have add-ons.

Extensions would be nice. The add-ons that IE has don't really compete with what Chrome and Firefox offers. If the IE team wants people to use IE rather than Firefox or Chrome, they need to at least have what both of those offer or else people would never give it the time of day.

Hopefully, most of these people that are moving away from IE are XP users. It doesn't matter which browser you use if you're using Windows 7, because IE9 actually isn't bad. It has good support for the Open Web Platform, and rarely creates an obstacle for Web developers.

"Internet Explorer 9's market share went up slightly from 4.2 percent in May to 5.7 percent in June"

Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't 0.5% quite large for 1 month when thinking about the world, and the limited platforms available to IE9? Especially considering on a month by month basis, Chrome grows by about 0.3%-0.6%.

yowan said,
Neither IE9 nor Opera 11.50 are successful, they fail and will always be failures
Having 53.7 percent of a market is not fail. You may consider the browser junk but it IS successful.

yowan said,
Neither IE9 nor Opera 11.50 are successful, they fail and will always be failures

opera 11.50 has been downloaded for over 17mln times. if something is not popular around your home it doesn't mean it's not popular around the world. opera has over 30% in russia and extremely popular in some other countries.

Asmodai said,
Having 53.7 percent of a market is not fail. You may consider the browser junk but it IS successful.

No it isn't. Being included as part of operating systems as the default browser doesn't mean it was succesfull. As long as IE comes embededes into Windows I'm pretty sure the matket share will never be below 40-50%.

yottabytewizard said,

No it isn't. Being included as part of operating systems as the default browser doesn't mean it was succesfull. As long as IE comes embededes into Windows I'm pretty sure the matket share will never be below 40-50%.

That doesn't fly, just because it comes with Windows you don't have to use it. If people don't like something they'll stop using it and find something else, it's why FF got to where it is and why Chrome is growing.

coth said,

opera 11.50 has been downloaded for over 17mln times. if something is not popular around your home it doesn't mean it's not popular around the world. opera has over 30% in russia and extremely popular in some other countries.

Here Here Opera rules much better than Maxthon which I used to use I did try FF but didn't really like it haven't used chrome at all so can't say although I did try Luna browser that was cool

Net Application's stats in not international. It's just US, Britain, Australia, Canada and just few more countries. IE has by far larger share.

coth said,
Net Application's stats in not international. It's just US, Britain, Australia, Canada and just few more countries. IE has by far larger share.

yeah, and IE6's largest install base is India and China..... wish they would get their butts moving to a new version already

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,

yeah, and IE6's largest install base is India and China..... wish they would get their butts moving to a new version already

That's because of the large amount of piracy in those countries. I am not doubting you're comment suggesting this - just point it out to the others that don't know.

I'm sure a lot of the botnet/zombie computers are in these countries too or at least are running some form of bootleg software.

coth said,
Net Application's stats in not international. It's just US, Britain, Australia, Canada and just few more countries. IE has by far larger share.

Lucky IE, as in most European countries Firefox has near 50%

coth said,
Net Application's stats in not international. It's just US, Britain, Australia, Canada and just few more countries. IE has by far larger share.

There really isn't a good overall indicator of browser usage. All you can really do is look at the trends rather than the absolute values.