iPhone celebrates five-year milestone

Today is one day after the fifth anniversary of Apple's iPhone being released to the public, and it marks the anniversary of when the concept of a smartphone became much more feasible. In January 2007, Apple's frontman, Steve Jobs, delivered one of his finest keynotes to introduce the company's latest device. His introduction to the iPhone went as following:

Today, we're introducing three revolutionary products. The first one is a widescreen iPod with touch controls. The second is a revolutionary mobile phone. The third is a breakthrough internet communications device. These are not three separate devices. This is one device. And we are calling it iPhone. Today Apple is going to reinvent the phone."

Depending on who you ask, Apple did and did not reinvent the phone. Some people would agree and some would oppose that opinion. We can definitely agree that the iPhone had a tremendous impact upon release, though. The original iPhone is difficult to find in common use, having had its support shed at iOS 3.1.3. Yet the 3G and 3GS, both older devices, are still common to find. iPhone 3GS devices still change hands for over £100 via eBay and other online retailers. They are still very much in demand despite being succeeded by both the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S.

The iPhone will be remembered as revolutionary as phones progress. It is one of the two main devices to have really pushed for more touch-screen devices on the market, alongside handsets running Google's Android operating system. With every refresh of the iPhone, Apple push the specifications a little further and add some new features. The prime example is Siri; the voice assistant exclusive to 4S at the time of writing. Apple's excellence in advertising has left the company able to refresh the phone annually and still know they will get sales from the device.

Famously, the iPhone was released to caution and doubt among technology journalists and fans, who questioned whether or not the device could really deliver. As the iPhone's legacy shows it did more than just deliver, blowing expectations out of the water as the formula was refined from year-to-year. The iPhone is now five years into a cycle which could last forever, if the device's popularity continues to expand and retain older customers as well. The future of the phone market is becoming more and more exciting with every new flagship device released, and the next iPhone will be no exception.

Image: Pavo23.Wordpress.com

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.Neo said,
Pretty sure a phone is unable to celebrate.

I don't think it was meant literally On a side note I wonder how many more years it will take for Apple to make a phone that can actually handle a call out without dropping out every other minute

JJ_ said,

I don't think it was meant literally On a side note I wonder how many more years it will take for Apple to make a phone that can actually handle a call out without dropping out every other minute

My phone never drops a call. You must be in a bad reception area.

Dinggus said,

My phone never drops a call. You must be in a bad reception area.

I only moved to iPhone a year ago with the 4S after parting ways with a 5 year old SE W810i which dropped about a handful of calls in the years I owned it. The dropped iPhone calls are on the same network and office I used my SE.

I still remember the initial keynote quite vividly. At the time it was a jaw dropping moment. I believe the phone I had was an Nokia N95 which was one of the high end smartphones at the time, but the iPhone made it look stupid with what it could do.

My favourite story about the introduction of the iPhone is RIM's apparent reaction, where all the engineers claimed it was 'impossible' to deliver what Apple had showcased on stage that day as it would be too power hungry.

"Imagine their surprise [at RIM] when they disassembled an iPhone for the first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic board strapped to it."

http://www.electronista.com/ar...as.lying.on.iphone.in.2007/

And there's also Steve Balmer's reaction to the iPhone..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eywi0h_Y5_U

DomZ said,
I still remember the initial keynote quite vividly. At the time it was a jaw dropping moment. I believe the phone I had was an Nokia N95 which was one of the high end smartphones at the time, but the iPhone made it look stupid with what it could do.

My favourite story about the introduction of the iPhone is RIM's apparent reaction, where all the engineers claimed it was 'impossible' to deliver what Apple had showcased on stage that day as it would be too power hungry.

"Imagine their surprise [at RIM] when they disassembled an iPhone for the first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic board strapped to it."

http://www.electronista.com/ar...as.lying.on.iphone.in.2007/

And there's also Steve Balmer's reaction to the iPhone..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eywi0h_Y5_U

That video sums up what a bumbling fool Ballmer is, I remember his claims that Microsoft will have a 40% share in the mobile market by 2012 (http://www.cellular-news.com/story/31153.php), what happened there Ballmer...

Enron said,

Ballmer was wrong about the touch keyboard being a big issue, but he was right about the $500+ price tag. Once they had the $199 and $99 subsidized iPhones, sales really took off.

I bought mine on day one for £200

Enron said,

Ballmer was wrong about the touch keyboard being a big issue, but he was right about the $500+ price tag. Once they had the $199 and $99 subsidized iPhones, sales really took off.

Well the current "touch" keyboard in WM when he said that was terrible.

Depicus said,

I bought mine on day one for £200

Not sure what model you're talking about or what "day one" is, but the original iPhone Ballmer is referencing launched at a $599 price point in the US, later cut to $399 to boost sales. Sales were still dwindling until the iPhone 3G came out, subsidized on contract with features that should have been on there from the beginning (app store, 3g, gps, etc).

DomZ said,

"Imagine their surprise [at RIM] when they disassembled an iPhone for the first time and found that the phone was battery with a tiny logic board strapped to it."

http://www.electronista.com/ar...as.lying.on.iphone.in.2007/

these days you can hardly find a rechargeable device without a pmu strapped to its battery. the fact that rim did not even think of it, or did not think it was feasible, is a sure sign of their trouble in days ahead.

thealexweb said,

That video sums up what a bumbling fool Ballmer is, I remember his claims that Microsoft will have a 40% share in the mobile market by 2012 (http://www.cellular-news.com/story/31153.php), what happened there Ballmer...

Some other quotes:

On Android: "I actually think Android hurts them more than it helps them. It's just going to divide them and people who want to be their partners."

On books: "It doesn't matter how good or bad the product is, the fact is that people don't read any more"
"The whole conception is flawed at the top because people don't read anymore."

Those quotes are attributed to Steve Jobs. He seemed to think that Android would bring down Google. But I think they are doing quite well for themselves.

He then said books are dead, nobody reads, then went on to not only create a book reader, marketplace, and an alleged monopoly in books. And don't forget the successful book that many read written about him.

Attacks on the "poor performance" of Intel chips vs. PPC, while they were switching to x86.

And let's not overlook his claim that the PC era was over, and then went on to try to sell us Mac computers, and in the latest numbers PC sales have increased.

But yea, only Ballmer is a fool. I could find many other Steve Jobs quotes that can make him look the bumbling fool also. But we should not tarnish Jobsy's glorious legacy, right?

nohone said,

But yea, only Ballmer is a fool. I could find many other Steve Jobs quotes that can make him look the bumbling fool also. But we should not tarnish Jobsy's glorious legacy, right?

But see, and here's the thing. Who said that Ballmer was the ONLY fool? No one. Yeah, Jobs has said and done some pretty stupid stuff, but no one in this thread implied that Ballmer was an idiot, and that Jobs was a saint. I mean, come on...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8To-6VIJZRE

...but it was actually Eddie Wu how made the claim that Microsoft would have a 40% share in the mobile market by 2012.

omgben said,
..but no one in this thread implied that Ballmer was an idiot

And nobody claimed Ballmer was an idiot. The point was that people like DomZ and thealexweb like to trumpet the follies of Ballmer, calling him a fool, while ignoring the foolishness of Jobs/Cook and holding them up as if they were the saviors of the tech industry.

When the iPhone was first introduced, Jobs wanted nothing to do with an SDK, instead he wanted people to develop web apps that ran in the browser. According to his autobiography, he fought hard against an SDK, until there was so much pressure from internal and external people that he was forced to give in. Now, you can't have an article on a non-iPhone smart phone without people trotting out the number of apps on the app store and mocking 100,000 apps available for the competition. Apple proudly proclaims the number of apps available and developers who build those apps, while people mock the "developers, developers, developers" quote. People have forgotten the foolishness of Jobs not wanting an SDK, focus on what amounted to him being dragged into it, and praise him for doing what he did not want.

nohone said,

snip

When did I say I like Jobs exactly, I despise him mostly. But he did a far better job than Ballmer has ever done or will do.

valhalla_rk said,
In the keynote it says it "five years more advance than any other phone".
what do you about that comment?

Well RIM and Nokia are still trying to sort themselves out, so in some respects he was right

When i got my iPhone 2g in 2008 and it had no apps it was really quite a blunt device. It still works but wifi doesnt and calls get dropped occasionally.

I'm not one to usually criticize someones writing on the site. However, this is a ****ty write up. It looks like someone took about 10 minutes to write the article and then posted it.

Much more thought, time and substance could have made this a great editorial.

To be honest, I had my reservations about the iPhone five years ago. I was still bumbling along with my W850i (walkman phones were all the rage back then, at least in Singapore), and wondered why anyone would buy a phone that didn't support Java apps, 3G, mass messaging, video calling or even MMS. To me it seemed the tradeoffs were too great, plus the fact that it had a non-removable battery and (what I thought was) an awful touchscreen keyboard.

I think version 2 and 3 of iPhone OS (as it was called back then) fixed many of these shortcomings, adding in 3G and MMS support, and the huge app store negated the use of J2ME completely (and Java seems to be the far forgotten child today, even more so than Flash).

Well, for me, I felt that iPhone was way overpriced anyway, but settled on an iPod touch to replace my ageing 5.5G iPod. It was great, and lucky me got a hand-me-down iPhone 4 from a sibling who upgraded to the 4S so I'm not complaining. It has its limitations and its age is showing, but at least it was far better than my previous phone (Nokia 5800) which often crashed after loading an image-heavy page.

trenzterra said,
To be honest, I had my reservations about the iPhone five years ago. I was still bumbling along with my W850i (walkman phones were all the rage back then, at least in Singapore), and wondered why anyone would buy a phone that didn't support Java apps, 3G, mass messaging, video calling or even MMS. To me it seemed the tradeoffs were too great, plus the fact that it had a non-removable battery and (what I thought was) an awful touchscreen keyboard.

I think version 2 and 3 of iPhone OS (as it was called back then) fixed many of these shortcomings, adding in 3G and MMS support, and the huge app store negated the use of J2ME completely (and Java seems to be the far forgotten child today, even more so than Flash).

Well, for me, I felt that iPhone was way overpriced anyway, but settled on an iPod touch to replace my ageing 5.5G iPod. It was great, and lucky me got a hand-me-down iPhone 4 from a sibling who upgraded to the 4S so I'm not complaining. It has its limitations and its age is showing, but at least it was far better than my previous phone (Nokia 5800) which often crashed after loading an image-heavy page.

I was in the same situation (had a w850i) but I fell for the hype and bought an iPhone without researching the features. Every phone I'd owned in the last ten years had supported MMS, sending messages to multiple people, forwarding text messages, and every phone in the last five years had supported 3G video calling. I didn't expect the revolutionary new device known as the iPhone not to support any of that stuff. It was a given at the time; not something you usually felt the need to check when buying a device.

I got it and when I went to mass message my friends at Christmas to say happy Christmas, I couldn't do it. At the time it had no copy and paste, you couldn't save a draft, you couldn't forward messages and you could only send a message to one person at a time. I would have to have literally typed each message out again for each person.

The iPhone has always, from the very beginning, excelled in some areas but it has been years behind in others. We've had to wait until version 6 to be able to attach files to the email composition screen. What is that about?

Apple also seems to have more apologists than any other company too. I used to criticise the iPhone for not having MMS on the Apple boards and members there used to say "just use email" despite my protests that not everyone I knew had email at the time.

Android is now to iOS what iOS was to others at the time it was released: years ahead.

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