IPv6 day on 8th June

There was internet panic by some when the last stocks of the traditional IP addresses that all of us are used to were passed down through the system for the last time. Some predicted the end of the internet while some of the select few realised that it will still be some time before we're really affected by the depletion of the IPv4 system. Given however that they won't last forever as is inevitable, a number of high profile companies have gotten together to create an IPv6 day to try and promote the use of the new system which so many are hesitant to invest in.

The fear at the moment is that Internet Service Providers (ISPs) around the world are not prepared for what will happen when the population have no choice but to start using the new internet protocol. While IPv6 has been around for some time, because it is was not in desperate need of implementing, and the complexity of the new system compared to the old one, implementation overall has been slow.

The day will involve Google, Facebook, Yahoo as well as Limelight Networks amongst others getting involved whereby those with an IPv6 connection will be able to make contact with the participating websites/servers. You can read more about it on the Internet Society website, the group which has organised the day. You can also test out whether you're IPv6 ready on this webpage.

While the main predicted success is to encourage organisations to get their act together and support a smooth transition to IPv6, the other benefit the supporters see is to test out the participants hardware and procedures for when the transition does eventually begin.

Image Credit: worldipv6day.org/

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Deo Domuique said,

The first thing I thought: It's one day after my birthday ( mine is 7 june ).

Me too: it's 14 days before my birthday.

If Google, Facebook and Yahoo will block all IPv4 access for only one hour this day, I am sure some ISPs would change their minds...

Unfortunately, Neowin's ISP doesn't yet provide IPv6 connectivity, so there's little we can do at the moment. Be assured I'll be all over it as soon as it becomes available.

Ricky65 said,
I'd much rather stick with my ipv4 address than have a long ugly ip6 address.
Everyone would, but it simply isn't an option. At some point, we will have to move on.

Ricky65 said,
I'd much rather stick with my ipv4 address than have a long ugly ip6 address.

ipv6 is a whole different mindset. you cannot use your "ipv4 brain" in the ipv6 world. gotta move on and think differently.

Ricky65 said,
I'd much rather stick with my ipv4 address than have a long ugly ip6 address.

Dynamic DNS services.

The future is inevitable, why people want to go backwards... make your IPV6 protocol is installed on your PC... just in case... some cable providers are ready for it... Just that they have not told anyone.

oriveradel said,
The future is inevitable, why people want to go backwards... make your IPV6 protocol is installed on your PC... just in case... some cable providers are ready for it... Just that they have not told anyone.

Comcast is almost completely ready, as a good half their footprint is doing widescale trials now.. Also, most consumer operating systems (back to XP Service Pack 2) are IPv6 ready today. The bigger issue are things like older router firmware and consoles that can't be upgraded to support IPv6.

The test-ipv6.com site says I'm a 0/10 for IPv6 readiness. Odd considering there are only 8 tests and I passed 5 of them overall. 6 tests are directed at IPv6 or IPv6 + IPv4 together and I passed 3 of those which makes me think my score should've been 5/10, not 0/10. Then again I bombed the IPv6 only tests of which there are 3 of them. So I guess somehow 0/3 = 0/10. Someone has some screwy testing methodologies.

That's like saying you've got a new car, got gas and all that in it but have no license but you should be considered "ready" to drive. Yeah, you got some check marks for having things you need but that doesn't make you ready to be on the road.

lukvdh said,
Most home-use routers in use at the moment are simply not IPV6-compatible.

Mine is, and it's about 3 and a half years old. It's not an expensive one either, just a standard WRT54G Linksys wifi router. I get IPV6 addresses from it too. The only thing is that even though it hands them out, there are no options in the GUI to manage them, even after flashing it with DD-WRT. Anyway, my point is that while they don't have options to manage it, I would assume that most routers at least support IPV6 since mine understands and issues IPV6 addresses.

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