Iran permanently suspends Gmail service

According to an article from the Wall Street Journal, as part of an attempt to thwart residents from trying to join antigovernment protests, Iran's telecommunication agency has decided to permanently suspend Gmail service throughout the country. In its place, Iran will push a national email service for Iranian citizens.

Based on the quote below, it's still unclear as to whether Gmail has already been shut off in Iran, or if this is just something that will happen in the near future. Either way, it looks like residents' freedom to choose an email provider is heading out the window. As of this report, Google has yet to make a comment.

"Iranians have reported widespread service disruptions to Internet and text messaging services, though mobile phones appeared to be operating normally Wednesday.

Iran's telecommunications agency announced what it described as a permanent suspension of Google Inc.'s email services, saying instead that a national email service for Iranian citizens would soon be rolled out. It wasn't clear late Wednesday what effect the order had on Google's email services in Iran."

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35 Comments

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Meh, the US government is doing the same but in some different way, and i bet that most (if not all) government are doing the same, one with more success than others.

I am an Iranian and I am currently living in Iran. I can tell you government is now wants to control all communication means to suppress democracy and freedom. They want to control all people in a way that fascists did (with technology of that time) or government of china is doing now.
About Gmail, by enabling security feature they cannot control conversations and emails but now thanks to NOKIA-Siemens they have technology to control all messages in Hotmail or Yahoo ...
No wonder they want to create their own database to gain control over easily.

I'd like to remind my fellow Americans, this is the reason we should stand up for an open internet, everywhere. Support net neutrality whenever you can, where ever you can. Thank you.

Another Consideration.
Iran has to be aware that NSA and CIA are strongly tied to Google and it's services. Iran isn't that different from the U.S. in the sense that they want to control and monitor communications in their country. That's right, we here in the U.S. are being monitored much more than you know and Google is at the top of the list. Wake up Sheeple.

Hahaiah said,
Another Consideration.
Iran has to be aware that NSA and CIA are strongly tied to Google and it's services. Iran isn't that different from the U.S. in the sense that they want to control and monitor communications in their country. That's right, we here in the U.S. are being monitored much more than you know and Google is at the top of the list. Wake up Sheeple.

You're funny.

Apparently, they have something "Earth shattering" that's coming tomorrow that I've heard from a few people. Duck and cover folks, duck and cover! ;)

http://www.theweek.com/article/index/106132/Irans_Feb_11_surprise

Or, maybe it's cancelling GMail access in the country ;)

briangw said,
Apparently, they have something "Earth shattering" that's coming tomorrow that I've heard from a few people. Duck and cover folks, duck and cover! ;)

http://www.theweek.com/article/index/106132/Irans_Feb_11_surprise

Or, maybe it's cancelling GMail access in the country ;)

They just reported the same thing on NBC news

Brent1700 said,
ummm... there are no human rights in IRAN
There are obviously /some/, just not as many or in the same style as elsewhere.

Pauleh said,
Isn't an invasion of privacy, like monitoring email, against human rights?

Is it even against human rights in the US?

Wasn't there a whole illegal "wire tapping" scandal back in the Bush years?

Edited by Shadrack, Feb 10 2010, 11:21pm :

Shadrack said,

Is it even against human rights in the US?

Wasn't there a whole illegal "wire tapping" scandal back in the Bush years?


It technically wasn't illegal. They were using wire-tapping without warrants to find domestic terrorists. I think they succeeded a few times too.

Brent1700 said,

It technically wasn't illegal. They were using wire-tapping without warrants to find domestic terrorists. I think they succeeded a few times too.

Exactly. Wire-tapping w/o warrants in the US is a reality. Go go Government! You get them Terrorist!

bjoswald said,
Of course they did. Iran hates everything about us.


Yet they probably still use Windows

Edited by vincent, Feb 10 2010, 10:59pm :

bjoswald said,
Of course they did. Iran hates everything about us.

Iran does not hate us, their government is worried that the pro-western sentiment felt by its citizens will cause a revolution. Hence, gmail being blocked...

ubergreek said,

Iran does not hate us, their government is worried that the pro-western sentiment felt by its citizens will cause a revolution. Hence, gmail being blocked...

Ah, how I wish everything western would just completely stop going to that counrty... I mean EVERYTHIING. Too bad money rules so many people though, like the government of Iran rules their people. I'd honestly love to see that government choke, and try to fend for itself.

Just stop trading with them altogether and leave them alone. Threat that if they do anything actually aggressive we'll bomb them completely off the map, but unless and until that happens, ignore them.

bjoswald said,
Of course they did. Iran hates everything about us.

It's not about the United States this time.

What's driving Ajad (and the mullahs backing him) round the twist are those protestors and dissidents using Web mail (and GMail/GoogleMail in particular) to get the word (and pictures) out about what's really going on in Iran. What sets "Ajad" apart from other would-be tyrants is that he's trying to cloak the action under the semi-respectable cloak of National Pride (semi-respectable in that there is nothing wrong with national pride or even nationalism per se; however, if any major country, such as the United States, did anything like that, it would be grounds for a retaliatory trade war).

I would expect that whatever national mail service gets set up (or one that may already exist) is owned, diectly or indirectly, either by the government or one or more mullahs. (Not Ajad himself; that would be Way Too Obvious.)

Any takers?