JPMorgan Chase data breach exposed half a million customers' data

JPMorgan Chase is the latest in a long line of companies to suffer a server breach exposing customer data; this time around, 465,000 customers may have had their personal details stolen from the banking giant.

The company played down the extent of the breach, saying that only a "small amount" of data was taken and that, while card numbers may have been exposed, it did not believe critical personal information such as birth dates and email addresses had been exposed. Even so, JPMorgan Chase is notifying affected customers through email starting Monday; the process is expected to take a few days.

The breach took place in the middle of September with JPMorgan Chase first noticing strange activity on www.ucard.chase.com, and even though this is now only being made known, the breach - which the company declined to share details on - has now been fixed and an investigation into the cause is underway.

David Harley, a senior research fellow at ESET said: "Seems to me that the last few years have established that no one is too big, too powerful, or too well-secured to suffer an attack or leakage."

Source: ITPortal | Image: Macro shot with credit card by Shutterstock

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>"Seems to me that the last few years have established that no one is too big, too powerful, or too well-secured to suffer an attack or leakage."

And for the rest, they've already been hacked but just don't know about it yet.

Funnily enough, my girlfriend banks with them and two months ago had a few thousand dollars taken out of her account. Chase took almost a month to sort it out and refund the money into her account, and a day later it happened again! Absolutely **** bank with the way the treated it.

That specific account she uses to pay off her student loans and life insurance, and nothing else. The account information has never been used online (by her), ever. So normally I would agree with what you're saying, but in this instance, it was down to the bank being hacked. They even admitted the fault (in writing) to her, but the problem was how long it took for them to resolve this, as that money was meant for paying loans and such and they didn't really care about haste in the slightest.

The problem in those cases Is not the money on the backaccount - that is insured. the problem is the ridiculous amout of data that is held with you bankaccount - not just what you gave them already with registering, but also the stuff they find for themselves to proof the stuff you provide them with

Most companies do not value the importance of IT. The owner of RBS said the same thing last week when the UK banks had an outage (not a hack AFAIK).

glen8 said,
Most companies do not value the importance of IT. The owner of RBS said the same thing last week when the UK banks had an outage (not a hack AFAIK).

^this.

anyone in IT will tell you its a PITA to purchase any new hardware or software for the company, even if its vital to security.

it's almost as if most companies don't actually give a fck about keeping things secure.

Should we use bcrypt for everything? Though, I do understand that isn't the most secure password hashing algorithm, but I think it'd help these dumbass companies get off the news for anything negative when it comes to internet security.

Does this fall under financial or economical terrorism and the NSA can then use their data to bring down the breaching parties?

Or are many of these attacks because of the backdoors required by the NSA?

I feel like this will get worse and worse over time.