Kaspersky patents hardware-based anti-virus

Kaspersky has just been granted a patent for a hardware-based anti-virus, something which could potentially revolutionize the way anti-virus software works.  The hardware-based anti-virus will be able to work independently or in combination with any software on the computer or machine.

The patented device by Kaspersky will connect inside of the computer or machine between the hard drive (HDD or SSD) and the computing unit, between the CPU and RAM. The device is also connected on the system bus or integrated into the disk controller.

The hardware-based anti-virus will effectively allow or block any writing to the hard disk, preventing viruses from starting in the first place.  Users will be alerted of the potential risk, preventing or denying the infection from being written to disk.

The patent shows that the device will be self-supported with an ARM processor and RAM, so it will not take away from the machines performance.  The device will also have its own database for malicious code and faulty records during definition updates.

Kaspersky did mention this could be sold and used on a consumer based market, but will help prevent miscellaneous code from spreading in servers and specialized machines initially, such as ATMs.

Thanks to Trey for the news tip!

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26 Comments

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If it`s protecting servers/ATM`s that`s a good thing surely, maybe less sites will be exploited thus less pc`s become infected...

For something like this. I don't want to jump into conclusions without seeing the specifications.

I think it will be something that will fit on the motherboard as a chip.

jingarelho said,
i just can see a virus writen to attack this hardware... that would be chaos... all data stream will flow through it.
That's like saying people will make viruses targeting graphics cards and harddrives? Eh?

Reminds me of those old BIOS virus utilities that used to be in PCs years ago. More often that not, it need to be switched off. I hope this doesn't go the same way!

As long as their are people using the computer, it will never be safe.

Educate them to not click Yes to everything and the world would be much better.

Ryoken said,
As long as their are people using the computer, it will never be safe.

Educate them to not click Yes to everything and the world would be much better.


+1.
That's the most difficult task. Just think about it:
[Prompt] "Your computer and all data will be destroyed if you click 'Yes' [/Prompt]

What do you think will 95% of the people do? :p

If it can't be disabled by software it's gonna cause all sorts of problems with legit apps.

If it can be disabled by software it's flawed.

I hope they made this, in the way this doesn't cost system performance at all (Yes, I know is hardware, and it won't do it), but you never know.

And... the problem will be the following, it's going to be a nuisance, just imagine it:

Subscription expired, and because you have hardware, there won't be a way to stop coming those pop ups. (I imagine that there will be.. but who knows!)
Argh.... Well.. got to see it first before badmouth it.

Jose_49 said,

And... the problem will be the following, it's going to be a nuisance, just imagine it:

Subscription expired, and because you have hardware, there won't be a way to stop coming those pop ups. (I imagine that there will be.. but who knows!)

Just remove the expansion card.

This sounds very interesting indeed, but I think it won't be hitting the consumer market anytime soon, if ever. Sounds more like an enterprise/server level solution

I can't see this going anywhere really. read and write will be effected if its not powerful enough, just make better use of computer resources, like the GPU.