Kindle for Web launched, preview and share samples

Amazon has launched a new service called Kindle for Web. Previously customers had the ability to Look Inside and preview a few pages of a book before they bought it. Now Amazon has renamed this Kindle for Web, increased the sample size to the entire first chapter of a novel, and added social networking and sharing features.

Kindle for Web allows the user to read the entire first chapter of a book they are interested in directly from their web browser; no additional software is required to use this service. Along with reading the first chapter, users can also share the sample in a variety of ways: integration with Facebook, Twitter, and even Bloggers who use Amazon's Associates Program allow the samples to be shared, CNET writes

Using the Facebook and Twitter integration, customers can easily post links to the full samples right on their wall or in their feed. For those that are a part of the Amazon's Associates Program, Amazon is pushing for those users to post the samples as every book that is bought from that referral link on their blog will earn the associate referral fees.

Giving access to the first chapter, as well as allowing all of this integration of social network sharing will help boost sales by word of mouth. Kindle for Web appears to be HTML-5 driven, and could be used on devices like iPad.

Amazon currently has a demo page up to let users get familiar with the new set up and learn exactly what it is all about.

Image credit: cnet.com

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8 Comments

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Doesn't this put more focus on using online books with any computer/laptop/netbook/tablet and take away from the Kindle? Of course, it looks like Amazon gets the revenue no matter where it is read.

ccoltmanm said,
Doesn't this put more focus on using online books with any computer/laptop/netbook/tablet and take away from the Kindle? Of course, it looks like Amazon gets the revenue no matter where it is read.

Not really. It allows the user of a Kindle to review a book prior to buying. Also there isn't all that many who use their computers (desktop/laptops) for reading books (to hard to carry around).

Pam14160 said,

Not really. It allows the user of a Kindle to review a book prior to buying. Also there isn't all that many who use their computers (desktop/laptops) for reading books (to hard to carry around).

But it allows anyone with a computer to review a book. How do you know there isn't all that many users? I always see people on netbooks reading what looks like books. They may be in the minority but you can't just say that.

ccoltmanm said,
Doesn't this put more focus on using online books with any computer/laptop/netbook/tablet and take away from the Kindle? Of course, it looks like Amazon gets the revenue no matter where it is read.

The concern you may have is that by allowing people to read the books on devices aside from the Kindle itself is that this takes away from potential revenue. This would seem to stem from a false assumption that the Kindle is a huge profit maker for Amazon. It is not. Unlike Apple, Amazon makes their money from selling the books, not the device, this is why we have Kindle for PC/Mac/iPhone/iPad/Android/BlackBerry and now the Web. This means that people who don't want to get a Kindle don't have to, and those that do have a Kindle can continue reading their books, where they left off, even if they forgot the Kindle device at home.

You may also consider the existence of someone like myself. I got my first taste of the Kindle via the PC app. I bought three or four books before I decided that I wanted a dedicated device to read them on. Being that the Kindle is largely regarded as the best eBook reader out there, and I already had an investment into the platform, I bought myself a 3rd Gen. Kindle

ccoltmanm said,

But it allows anyone with a computer to review a book. How do you know there isn't all that many users? I always see people on netbooks reading what looks like books. They may be in the minority but you can't just say that.


Yes I can. . .

ccoltmanm said,
Doesn't this put more focus on using online books with any computer/laptop/netbook/tablet and take away from the Kindle? Of course, it looks like Amazon gets the revenue no matter where it is read.
Nah... From what I heard there are two teams in the Kindle arena.

One, obviously, makes the Kindle, they do all the development and what not and whatever else relating to the device itself.

The other is the Kindle store... Their goal is to sell as many books as possible. The best way is to get it on as many devices as possible.

I doubt it would deter anyone from getting a Kindle. Because if they didn't want one, they likely would have another device, but they get get all the books from Amazon through the Kindle app. So they gain because that person wasn't going to get a Kindle anyways.

Sraf said,
The concern you may have is that by allowing people to read the books on devices aside from the Kindle itself is that this takes away from potential revenue. This would seem to stem from a false assumption that the Kindle is a huge profit maker for Amazon. It is not. Unlike Apple, Amazon makes their money from selling the books, not the device, this is why we have Kindle for PC/Mac/iPhone/iPad/Android/BlackBerry and now the Web. This means that people who don't want to get a Kindle don't have to, and those that do have a Kindle can continue reading their books, where they left off, even if they forgot the Kindle device at home.
Apple makes its money from iTunes (Music, Apps, Books, Videos) more than they make money from selling hardware. Unlike Amazon, Apple is not into selling Books either. They simply want to be the medium through which you can consume digital media and being the medium earns them a lot of $.

You're right about Amazon, however. Amazon is basically selling the Kindle at a loss. I have yet to see a revenue figure for Kindle sales and Kindle Book sales.