Latest Windows Phone 7.8 update removes Google Contacts & Calendar sync

Two Windows Phone 7.8 updates have been pushed out in close succession recently, with the final build number for the most recent version resting at 7.10.8862.144. While this update has fixed the issues associated with Live Tiles not updating on the platform, a user on Reddit has discovered that it's no longer possible to sync your Google contacts and calendar after resetting your phone.

The difference in Google account settings between the latest WP7.8 build (left) and WP8 (right). There are no checkboxes available in WP7.8

User blorgon, with a HTC Radar, hard reset his device (removing all of the phone's data) before updating to the latest version of Windows Phone 7.8 through Zune. After the process was complete, he discovered that he could no longer sync his Google contacts or calendar when setting up a new Google account to sync. The checkboxes normally present in the settings for existing users have simply disappeared.

This is likely a by-product of the decision by Google to drop support for adding new Exchange ActiveSync-synced accounts after July 31st, with the company preferring you use IMAP, CardDAV and CalDAV for email, contacts and calendar syncing. Windows Phone used EAS to sync Google accounts, and Microsoft is working to support these different protocols in Windows Phone by the time EAS support is fully dropped.

What's odd here is that Microsoft has removed support for making new EAS-synced Google accounts in Windows Phone 7.8 before the cut-off, and without adding in any other system for contact and calendar syncing, and using IMAP for email sync. It's unclear at this stage if another update is in the works for WP7.8 that will bring CardDAV and CalDAV support to the legacy operating system, but for now it's advised not to reset your freshly-updated WP7.8 device if you value full Google account sync.

Source: Reddit via: WMPU

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

'Jobs' biopic delayed; no new release date

Next Story

More on how Vyclone's HTML5 video editing feature was made

47 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I'm guessing that .144 is the last update for the WP7 platform that Microsoft intends to do, and they figured they'd take the hit now rather than wait until Google "breaks" Windows Phone in June. It is unthinkable to me that Microsoft will add CalDAV and CardDAV support to WP7 at this point.

Sounds like a great reason to follow the overwhelming majority of smartphone users by using anything but a Windows Phone.

You do realize that they are dropping support for the CalDAV API and they are not dropping support for CalDAV.

Directly from Jordan Pedraz - Google Enterprise Edition

--

CalDAV is an internet standard that's used to sync Google Calendar with your Apple iOS devices (including iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch) and iCal.

The CalDAV API allows you to develop client applications that create new events, edit or delete existing events, and search for events.

--

It is my understanding that they are dropping support for CalDAV in favor of the more recent Google Calender API.

Only developers that utilize the CalDAV API for accessing Google Calendars to read/write/update events are effected. And if at this time cannot update their application they can be whitelisted until they do.

And it has already been reported that Microsoft has already been whitelisted for access to the CalDAV API until they update. (http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/38...cess-to-google-calendar-api)

-Brent

Just updated the Vanila 1.0 rOm with SevenEighter on Ol' Omnia7.
The settings in Google Mail account are still there (checkboxes available, full options)

Cheers,

nAr

Google has obviously decided to go to war with Microsoft and the customer be damned. Seems like Microsoft has picked up the gauntlet. This will be a VERY one-sided battle. Google can't write software. Microsoft can.

Nobody - and I do mean nobody - in the industry trusts Google. Their biggest Android OEM, Samsung, is about to dump them, they're about to be banned in Germany, a judge in Seattle is going to hammer them for breach of contract and the EU is eying them up menacingly.

They've literally screwed up everything they've touched. This must be a new definition of "management skill".

All this shuffling by Google makes it very clear...

Want to use all Google stuff, get a Android Phone..
Want to use a WP7/8, move to Outlook.com for your email, contacts and calender.

It's all about the 'ecosystem', and Google is trying more and more to lure you over to the Android side of thing.
But Google is killing a lot of services lately without any notice :-\
Not defending MS or attacking Google, it's just how I see it.

Wide vendor support doesn't mean it is a Industrial Standard, and IMAP also support push config.

p.s. most pc come with windows, does it means it is a Industrial Standard for PC? sure not.

Um.. One could argue that when a majority of people in that industry use the exact same thing.. it becomes a standard..
here's the definition of standard "something considered by an authority or by general consent as a basis of comparison; an approved model. "
Notice the part about General Consent..
Windows is by far the Standard in computing.. as it is what everything else is judged by..

I have the latest 7.8 and I still see that option in the second picture for my google account when looking in Settings, in System and email accounts. so who removed what?

You can click advanced setup and enter the exchange activesync settings in manually
username: your full email including @gmail.com
domain: google
server: m.google.com

korupt_one said,
yup move to Outlook and the new calendar will be coning soon also. Outlook is just simply better than Gmail.

Lmao. No thank you!

Depicus said,

Or move to Android, IOS or any other decent mobile OS.

And enjoy poor battery life, poor handling of large amounts of email and no push email for non-Google applications? You're losing every way, mate.

It would have been nice if the updated detailed what happens to your phone when installing it.
I never saw a detailed description of what WP updates included.

Hahaiah said,
IMAP is outdated? Hell I'm still using POP3 and was about to switch over...what's best?

EAS would allow you to get push notifications for example (while using less battery) and is arguably more secure too.

Obry said,

EAS would allow you to get push notifications for example (while using less battery) and is arguably more secure too.

"Arguably" being a key word here. I have nothing against EAS, I actually like it; a single protocol that works for mail, contacts, calendar, reminders, task, ect, and also allows some remote management of the phone. However, IMAP over SSL is perfectly secure, and just about any IMAP server or client made in the last 6+ years supports the IDLE command, which allows for push notifications.

Its advised you move your email over to outlook.com, login to gmail go to settings and forward all mail from gmail to outlook where you can use EAS. Inform all of your contacts of your new email address, then eventually as less mail comes in from gmail you can delete the gmail account entirely so google does not have access to your private information that they sell to advertiser.

Google uses a proprietary protocol - google calendar api for calendar syncing now instead of the industry standard EAS. They said they support CalDAV but thats not entirely true, they simply whitelist a few companies to allow CalDAV; but its google after all - how long will they allow that service to stay online? Google is unreliable.

Who knows when the calendar api will be dropped as well? They seem to drop support for so many things, Reader, EAS, CalDAV. Google's products are simply unreliable and harmful to your privacy.

Edited by pgn1, Mar 16 2013, 3:03am :

Exchange ActiveSync is also a proprietary protocol. Just happens to be owned by Microsoft.

I think this is pretty silly of MS personally as the only people that are hurt are users. If MS wants users to be forced to transition to Outlook.com instead of using GMail that will only become another obstacle to them selling Windows Phone devices. Outlook.com may be better, but users don't expect to be forced to change their email provider just because they picked a rival phone.

LogicalApex said,
Exchange ActiveSync is also a proprietary protocol. Just happens to be owned by Microsoft.

I think this is pretty silly of MS personally as the only people that are hurt are users. If MS wants users to be forced to transition to Outlook.com instead of using GMail that will only become another obstacle to them selling Windows Phone devices. Outlook.com may be better, but users don't expect to be forced to change their email provider just because they picked a rival phone.


It's silly of MS that Google stopped supporting EAS and CardDAV?

LogicalApex said,
Exchange ActiveSync is also a proprietary protocol. Just happens to be owned by Microsoft.

I think this is pretty silly of MS personally as the only people that are hurt are users. If MS wants users to be forced to transition to Outlook.com instead of using GMail that will only become another obstacle to them selling Windows Phone devices. Outlook.com may be better, but users don't expect to be forced to change their email provider just because they picked a rival phone.

EAS is the industry standard regardless who makes it. Every email provider that is worthwhile provides it, because it simply is the best way to sync email, contacts and calendar.

This isn't Microsoft that is pulling eas support, this is google that pulled it. They intend to add CardDAV and CalDAV support to sync contacts and calendar data, and use IMAP (which is some 1990's outdated technology) that google suggests to use to sync their email.

But google being as unreliable as they are now came out on the 13th and told everyone that CalDAV is being retired and you have to be whitelisted for it to be supported.

So they tell everyone CalDAV is the way to sync calendar data with accounts because it is open source and should be the standard; then they come back and tell everyone months later that no actually CalDAV is being retired and replaced with Google Calendar API - a fully proprietary protocol.

Google simply cant decide what protocols they want to support, or more accurately they had no intentions of keeping CalDAV anyway and used 'open source' as an excuse to come up with their own propriatry protocol later on down the line once all the google apologists came out stating imap, caldav and carddav were open standards and should be used. Now that those apologists did their work they quietly release that CalDAV is not supported in the same blogpost about Google Reader being dropped - another unreliable google product; and to use google calendar api. Really the best solution is instead of writing up HACKS to support gmail and googles products is to not support them at all - google should follow the industry standard of EAS.

Mind you NO ONE uses Google Calendar API on their mail systems but google; while the majority of enterprise capable email providers support Microsoft EAS.

So really the best solution is to move your email to outlook and dump your gmail account.

Edited by pgn1, Mar 16 2013, 3:58am :

LogicalApex said,
Exchange ActiveSync is also a proprietary protocol. Just happens to be owned by Microsoft.

I think this is pretty silly of MS personally as the only people that are hurt are users. If MS wants users to be forced to transition to Outlook.com instead of using GMail that will only become another obstacle to them selling Windows Phone devices. Outlook.com may be better, but users don't expect to be forced to change their email provider just because they picked a rival phone.

Pretty much. MS should of kept it. Granted, would of been cut off sooner or later but MS just screwed their customers but cutting them off sooner. Oh well, this will all blow over soon and on the drama will continue with something else.

Another day, more craziness...

techbeck said,

Pretty much. MS should of kept it. Granted, would of been cut off sooner or later but MS just screwed their customers but cutting them off sooner.

In December, Google said EAS support was ending January 31st. This update might have been written with that knowledge, before it was extended to July 31st. In any case, it's only a few months early.

Agreed. MS really screwed their customers by forcing Google to remove support for EAS. They should just switch to the Google Calendar API, which is the de facto open source calendar syncing standard that is light years ahead of the dated proprietary evil EAS.

Also, non-Webkit browsers like IE and Firefox should die as they do not support Google's version of HTML5 that is more open and versatile than the original HTML5 standard. The web will only get better with a single standard rendering engine. What is the point of a standard if people are given the choice to ignore it?

BajiRav said,

It's silly of MS that Google stopped supporting EAS and CardDAV?

Seriously? You're defending MS here?

Obviously, Windows Phone has built in EAS support. Otherwise, they would have had to remove support for their own Exchange servers. They didn't do that so that means they specifically put in code to ruin the lives of their customers in the interim here.

To support that is just lunacy...

Even if you want to make the argument that Google shouldn't have removed EAS support on their side. There is no reason MS had to nerf GMail users when EAS support has to be present in the OS period to support MS's own products.

LogicalApex said,

Seriously? You're defending MS here?

Obviously, Windows Phone has built in EAS support. Otherwise, they would have had to remove support for their own Exchange servers. They didn't do that so that means they specifically put in code to ruin the lives of their customers in the interim here.

To support that is just lunacy...

Even if you want to make the argument that Google shouldn't have removed EAS support on their side. There is no reason MS had to nerf GMail users when EAS support has to be present in the OS period to support MS's own products.

I don't follow...So Google removed the support on their end making EAS no longer an option for new phones. You know it takes two to tango; those old EAS super screens on Windows Phones stopped working as of Jan 30th (Google's doing). Why would MS not remove it from the phone? You would prefer if they left the setup screen there and just added red text across the top saying "This feature is now being blocked by Google, it will not work, but feel free to try for yourself."

EDIT: I just read that Google extended the support for EAS on Windows Phones until July, so this is a few month early on MS's part. That does strike me as a little strange. I would have preferred MS leave the feature there until support was removed or until they are able to fully support CalDAV and CardDAV.

Edited by sphbecker, Mar 16 2013, 4:52am :

LogicalApex said,

Seriously? You're defending MS here?

Obviously, Windows Phone has built in EAS support. Otherwise, they would have had to remove support for their own Exchange servers. They didn't do that so that means they specifically put in code to ruin the lives of their customers in the interim here.

To support that is just lunacy...

Even if you want to make the argument that Google shouldn't have removed EAS support on their side. There is no reason MS had to nerf GMail users when EAS support has to be present in the OS period to support MS's own products.

Google removed EAS support from gmail for new accounts. Google stated no new accounts will support EAS - that deadline was January 2013 and was later extended to July 2013. That is 4 months from now. So Microsoft removing EAS for gmail accounts now or in 4 months makes very little difference - the end user has a choice to make; support gmail and its nonstandard methods to sync contacts and calendar or move to a more reliable email system like outlook that uses EAS. Microsoft should not add in support for CardDAV or CalDAV as google has already shown they are removing support for CalDAV and are only whitelisting it (for now), what will they do with CardDAV? Will that be obsolete in 4 months? Probably and replaced with another google proprietary protocol.

sphbecker said,

I don't follow...So Google removed the support on their end. You know it takes two to tango. WTF should MS keep setup instructions on their phone for something that no longer works?

It works for existing users... It is also supported by paid GMail users as well... Like those using Google Apps platform.

pgn1 said,

Google removed EAS support from gmail for new accounts. Google stated no new accounts will support EAS - that deadline was January 2013 and was later extended to July 2013. That is 4 months from now. So Microsoft removing EAS for gmail accounts now or in 4 months makes very little difference - the end user has a choice to make; support gmail and its nonstandard methods to sync contacts and calendar or move to a more reliable email system like outlook that uses EAS. Microsoft should not add in support for CardDAV or CalDAV as google has already shown they are removing support for CalDAV and are only whitelisting it (for now), what will they do with CardDAV? Will that be obsolete in 4 months? Probably and replaced with another google proprietary protocol.

How does EAS support determine the reliability of an MTA (Mail Transport Agent)?

LogicalApex said,

It works for existing users... It is also supported by paid GMail users as well... Like those using Google Apps platform.

That's still supported.

SETTINGS > EMAIL+ACCOUNTS > Add an Account > Outlook outlook.com, exchange, office 365.

You would choose to add it as an Exchange account rather than choosing 'Google' in the account setup screen.

LogicalApex said,

How does EAS support determine the reliability of an MTA (Mail Transport Agent)?

IMAP is not as reliable when syncing email, it also uses PULL technology which uses more battery power than EAS which uses PUSH and pushes email to you in realtime. IMAP requires you to keep polling the server every few minutes to check if a new message is available. That's simply not as reliable or as efficient as EAS. Keeping emails in sync across multiple devices with IMAP is also a poor method compared to EAS.

Google also changing their standards for how to sync Calendar from CardDAV to google calendar api also puts into question how reliable their service is and when they choose to arbitrarily drop support for certain standards they stated just months ago as 'being industry standards and open source'.

pgn1 said,

IMAP is not as reliable when syncing email, it also uses PULL technology which uses more battery power than EAS which uses PUSH and pushes email to you in realtime. IMAP requires you to keep polling the server every few minutes to check if a new message is available. That's simply not as reliable or as efficient as EAS. Keeping emails in sync across multiple devices with IMAP is also a poor method compared to EAS.

Google also changing their standards for how to sync Calendar from CardDAV to google calendar api also puts into question how reliable their service is and when they choose to arbitrarily drop support for certain standards they stated just months ago as 'being industry standards and open source'.

Protocol != MTA

LogicalApex said,

Protocol != MTA

Changing your mind every few months on what protocol to use = unreliable!

If your email doesn't work on your device because your email provider keeps changing their mind on how you can access it then its an unreliable service. This change doesn't only affect Windows Phone, but the iPhone as well, BlackBerry and any other OS that wants to access gmail.

pgn1 said,

That's still supported.

SETTINGS > EMAIL+ACCOUNTS > Add an Account > Outlook outlook.com, exchange, office 365.

You would choose to add it as an Exchange account rather than choosing 'Google' in the account setup screen.

Here are the full settings, if you already used EAS with your gmail account and reset your device you can still use EAS. You just cant set it up using the 'google' account in WP.

Go into SETTINGS > EMAIL + ACCOUNTS
Chooose > ADD AN ACCOUNT
Choose > OUTLOOK outlook.com, exchange, office 365 (do not use the GOOGLE choice)

Email address: your gmail/google apps address whatever@whatever.com
Password: your password

Click the SIGN IN button

It will then prompt you to enter your EAS server settings.

Use the following:

Account: your gmail/google apps email address: whatever@whatever.com

EAS domain: google
EAS server: m.google.com


This change by MS simply removed the ability to use the ADD EMAIL+ACCOUNT> Google option to use EAS.

Edited by pgn1, Mar 16 2013, 4:38am :

LogicalApex said,

Seriously? You're defending MS here?

Obviously, Windows Phone has built in EAS support. Otherwise, they would have had to remove support for their own Exchange servers. They didn't do that so that means they specifically put in code to ruin the lives of their customers in the interim here.

To support that is just lunacy...

Even if you want to make the argument that Google shouldn't have removed EAS support on their side. There is no reason MS had to nerf GMail users when EAS support has to be present in the OS period to support MS's own products.


I would rather have them not remove it but since it's going to stop working by the time this update rolls out to everyone by apr-may, it's about a month more for EAS to stop working with Gmail.
You have to be nuts to spin this into an anti-MS tirade. Google EOLed EAS support in free gmail by June 2013 so MS stopped supporting it.
How is this MS' problem? I am pretty sure paid Google Apps users can configure there phones using the Exchange account option.
If you actually used Windows Phone you'd know that this article is about the Google account option. That thing always switched to just IMAP if you removed contacts/calendar during setup. It would use EAS if you selected all three.
Existing users can still configure their Gmail account as Exchange account and they will work (as long as Gmail supports it)

So tell me again, how is this me defending Microsoft?

>> The web will only get better with a single standard rendering engine.
Actually, going by proven and documented history, real growth, innovation, and development happens where there's a lot of diversity and 'way out there' ideas being added into focused discussion. Don't forget that even WebKit is an offshoot of KHTML, an Open Source web rendering engine. Diversity is a part of everything around us, monolithic ideology may work out great for a select few but it bogs down long-term growth from an overall perspective.

BajiRav said,

I would rather have them not remove it but since it's going to stop working by the time this update rolls out to everyone by apr-may, it's about a month more for EAS to stop working with Gmail.
You have to be nuts to spin this into an anti-MS tirade. Google EOLed EAS support in free gmail by June 2013 so MS stopped supporting it.
How is this MS' problem? I am pretty sure paid Google Apps users can configure there phones using the Exchange account option.
If you actually used Windows Phone you'd know that this article is about the Google account option. That thing always switched to just IMAP if you removed contacts/calendar during setup. It would use EAS if you selected all three.
Existing users can still configure their Gmail account as Exchange account and they will work (as long as Gmail supports it)

So tell me again, how is this me defending Microsoft?

Neither company is right. It annoys me that users are caught like pawns in the middle.

Yeah... I forgot I never used Windows Phone...

Edited by LogicalApex, Mar 16 2013, 6:08am :

LogicalApex said,
Exchange ActiveSync is also a proprietary protocol. Just happens to be owned by Microsoft.

I think this is pretty silly of MS personally as the only people that are hurt are users. If MS wants users to be forced to transition to Outlook.com instead of using GMail that will only become another obstacle to them selling Windows Phone devices. Outlook.com may be better, but users don't expect to be forced to change their email provider just because they picked a rival phone.

You missunderstand, even if you are an existing user, you cannot sync with gmail/calendar/contacts if you use a new device. Also once your settings gmail setting are removed, gmail will not allow you to resync after.

BajiRav said,

I would rather have them not remove it but since it's going to stop working by the time this update rolls out to everyone by apr-may, it's about a month more for EAS to stop working with Gmail.
You have to be nuts to spin this into an anti-MS tirade. Google EOLed EAS support in free gmail by June 2013 so MS stopped supporting it.
How is this MS' problem? I am pretty sure paid Google Apps users can configure there phones using the Exchange account option.
If you actually used Windows Phone you'd know that this article is about the Google account option. That thing always switched to just IMAP if you removed contacts/calendar during setup. It would use EAS if you selected all three.
Existing users can still configure their Gmail account as Exchange account and they will work (as long as Gmail supports it)

So tell me again, how is this me defending Microsoft?

How do you keep missing the part about paying customers and existing devices being able to use EAS. It's only for NEW devices not being able to use it.

farmeunit said,

How do you keep missing the part about paying customers and existing devices being able to use EAS. It's only for NEW devices not being able to use it.


I am not missing it. I am just calling bull**** on people who are claiming that this change somehow prevents people from accessing Gmail on their windows phone via either IMAP or EAS.

hin123 said,
Agreed. MS really screwed their customers by forcing Google to remove support for EAS. They should just switch to the Google Calendar API, which is the de facto open source calendar syncing standard that is light years ahead of the dated proprietary evil EAS.

Also, non-Webkit browsers like IE and Firefox should die as they do not support Google's version of HTML5 that is more open and versatile than the original HTML5 standard. The web will only get better with a single standard rendering engine. What is the point of a standard if people are given the choice to ignore it?


I love how your passion for Google evolves your world. Nothing compares to EAS so far that's why Microsoft licenses it. In essence Google wrote nothing (Linux => Android, Webkit => Chrome). Chrome supports HTML5 API that IS NOT SIGNED OFF. Their erratic behaviour is doing nobody a favour.