Lots of websites are already telling Satya Nadella how to do his job as Microsoft CEO

After 22 years of being bossed around at Microsoft, Satya Nadella probably thought being named top dog at the company meant he’d no longer have people telling him what to do. Well, if he thought that, he was wrong.

Tuesday was Nadella’s first day on the job as Microsoft’s chief executive, and plenty of websites are already telling him what he “needs” and “must” do to be successful, as if he weren’t capable of formulating his own ideas.

USA Today, for instance, has a list of the “five things Microsoft’s new CEO must do.” LAPTOP Magazine one-ups USA Today by going for the “six things Microsoft’s new CEO must do to save Windows,” and Forbes also lists “six things Microsoft’s new CEO Satya Nadella needs to do now.” Not to be outdone, CNET has a list of “eight things Satya Nadella needs to do to jump-start Microsoft.” CBS News doesn’t get into a numbers argument with its article about “what Satya Nadella must do to fix Windows,” but it still gives him a list of four demands as if it were taking Microsoft hostage, if you were wondering.

If there’s an underlying theme between most of the articles, it’s that Nadella needs to “embrace the cloud,” as USA Today puts it, and “figure out the mobile strategy,” as Forbes says – two things Microsoft’s new CEO has already said he’s focusing on. Apparently Nadella’s informal mission statement went unnoticed, but the lists still have plenty of other advice.

Forbes, for instance, thinks Nadella needs to “go insane,” because “Microsoft is in a war for survival.” What exactly this means isn’t quite clear, but Forbes really wants him to become a “fire-people-in-the-elevator psychopathic” – something that will obviously be good for employee morale.

Focusing on the company’s flagship operating system, LAPTOP Magazine says Microsoft needs to kill Windows RT, calling it a “hobbled version of Windows that runs only on ARM-powered devices.” Instead of simply killing the desktop on Windows RT, LAPTOP thinks Microsoft should emulate x86 applications on the ARM-powered OS, because clearly tablets need more applications that aren’t designed for touch input. Microsoft has already dropped hints that it will work on versions of Windows specific to device type while still having the same underlying APIs, so it’s doubtful Nadella will listen to this advice unless he fires the entire Windows team in an elevator like a psychopath.

The advice isn’t limited to just product and service suggestions, either – CNET is more than happy to give Nadella fashion advice, saying he should “keep rocking that hoodie.” This will help him “not sweat as much as Ballmer did on stage,” apparently.

Here’s Neowin’s official list of advice on what you must do as CEO, Satya:

  1. Get in a fight with Mark Zuckerberg about who has the best hoodie style.
  2. Order a singing telegram, meet the messenger in the elevator and “fire” him or her just to see what it feels like (you know you want to).
  3. Don’t listen to any websites that give you lists about what you must do as CEO.

Image via Microsoft

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Hey Beavis... Who do you think would win in a fight between Satya Nadella, Mark Zuckerberg and Axl Rose?

... I'm not sure, but Axl would get his butt kicked!

Yeah because Windows 7 and XP came out a time when someone else was CEO of Microsoft

Yet again, even though I mention this every single time you bring it up, you blame Ballmer for all the mistakes MS made, but never give him credit for their success. Because yeah he had no part to play in Win7 BUT all of a sudden by magic he controlled everything about Win8.

It's not like Steven Sinofsky (the guy who was mostly responsible for Metro) had any say in it at all...

-Razorfold said,
Yeah because Windows 7 and XP came out a time when someone else was CEO of Microsoft

Yet again, even though I mention this every single time you bring it up, you blame Ballmer for all the mistakes MS made, but never give him credit for their success. Because yeah he had no part to play in Win7 BUT all of a sudden by magic he controlled everything about Win8.

It's not like Steven Sinofsky (the guy who was mostly responsible for Metro) had any say in it at all...

O.J. Simpson, awesome track record, his successes were overshadowed by his deliberate choice to murder 2 people.

Ballmer, awesome track record, his successes were overshadowed by his deliberate choice to murder the desktop.

:-D

-Razorfold said,
Except that it was never his choice, it was Sinofsky's. And look where he is lol.

Because Sinofsky acted as a rogue employee.

Billy Gun said,
I'll be one of them!

Ivest in Windows Media Center!


I think that ship sailed long ago, unfortunately. I really wish Microsoft would find a good live TV strategy for PCs and stick with it.

Forbes:

Figure Out The Mobile Strategy

Microsoft has basically two choices. Continue with the current strategy, with Windows Phone 7 and Nokia


WP7? Seriously? Retarded technology writers.

Not retarded at all, just technology writers who realize that a vast majority of business/enterprise organizations along with serious consumers have tasks involving serious content creation--mouse, keyboard. Hence, Windows-7 more easily fits that model. Regrettably, when Windows-8 presented just the Metro UI, it was a clear instance of pandering to the touch-centric market. What ever happened to choice?

TsarNikky said,
Not retarded at all, just technology writers who realize that a vast majority of business/enterprise organizations along with serious consumers have tasks involving serious content creation--mouse, keyboard. Hence, Windows-7 more easily fits that model. Regrettably, when Windows-8 presented just the Metro UI, it was a clear instance of pandering to the touch-centric market. What ever happened to choice?

Maybe you should go back and read what he posted...Windows Phone 7! Not Windows 7....huge difference and i don't think your reply can be interchanged to suit WP7/WP8

Microsoft needs Windows RT. They need an ARM powered OS that isn't hindered by larger more capable devices, like a phone OS would.

Nobody knows how to run a company, but they may be telling you what poeple want, what the street thinks.

Listening can't hurt, ESPECIALLY after the company has run over their customers and caused an uproar in a big chunk of them... and sales don't accompany you.

The only thing MS needs to do is change their general perception from the public.

MS is making a ton of money, their products are good the only issues is the general Anti MS banter floating around the internet regardless of what MS does.

MS just has a perception problem.

who cares what internet nerds think. they don't represent the real market

In a surprise upset,Microsoft trumped Apple and Samsung in the TRUE brand rankings. In fact, Microsoft was the only brand in the survey to achieve the coveted trailblazer status indicating that the Microsoft brand is at the forefront of brand building with a unique and distinct brand identity that sets it apart from other brands.

http://blogs.forrester.com/tra...ttle_for_consumer_mindshare

There's a ton of them out there. I believe Ed's was more along the lines of what he thinks will happen, however, not saying "this is what you must do."

Agree with Neowins list, a lot of websites act like they know how to manage a company as big as Microsoft. Truth is, they do not. They don't have the slightest idea...

All those thoughts about "embrace the cloud" and "mobile strategy" are all find and dandy, for long-term goals and objectives. Never forget, however, the millions of business and serious consumer user who have intense data entry requirements and need full-size keyboards, mice, and desktops. (Tap and thwack doesn't work.) In other words, do not abandon the laptop and desktop for the very transient tablet and mobile setting. Make sure the next OS (Windows-9) will suit both arenas equally well, instead of the one-sided Windows-8.

TsarNikky said,
.....

You sepak as though there is value for customers to continue to use out-dated means of system interaction.

Why would I enter data with keyboard? Why not pull it from a webservice, RESTful endpoint, camera, IR scanner, verbal etc. Sure bean counters with accounting programs may need archaic interfaces while the Dynamics team figures out Modern, but even then, the world is changing.

I for one long for the day when I can ditch the keyboard and mouse entirely.

How does one get original content from one's brain into a computer? I don't one being able to "pull it" from an existing source. Think reports, memos, analysis, etc.

... not even now, 19 mins after your post - still waiting to for someone to bring-up PROBLEM #1 - BRING-BACK THE START MENU!!!!

?? Where are all the million-chicken-voices this PM? Have I left the Neowin forums by mistake..?

Maybe the million-chicken-voices suddenly realised Win 8.1's pretty sweet, even without that menu.... ha.... hah....... right...

Mugwump00 said,
... not even now, 19 mins after your post - still waiting to for someone to bring-up PROBLEM #1 - BRING-BACK THE START MENU!!!!

?? Where are all the million-chicken-voices this PM? Have I left the Neowin forums by mistake..?

Maybe the million-chicken-voices suddenly realised Win 8.1's pretty sweet, even without that menu.... ha.... hah....... right...


Oh, well that post verified that I didn't leave Neowin by mistake.

I will offer my advice on what he "needs" to do:

1.) Ignore anyone not directly involved with the company offering "suggestions" on how to do something they have absolutely no idea about.
2.) Do what he thinks is right.

That's all.

The most important thing Microsoft needs to do right now is to listen to customers. So he shouldn't be ignoring anyone but MS insiders. This is what has gotten this in the pickle they are in now...

But it doesn't matter anyway. This guy is a puppet for Gates. It will be interesting to see what Gates presses for now that he is back at the helm without the political flak.

Funny thing is that Windows needs saving? Really? dindn't they get the memo that Windows is more alive than ever. A PC last more time than ever and people arent' buying new pc's every year. I remember when I first bought my first PC and in two months it was outdated and slow. That is no longer the case. This is the main reason why PC's aren't being bought more often. The industry is in a transition now and as always needs to level up before it can grow again.

LogicalApex said,
The most important thing Microsoft needs to do right now is to listen to customers. So he shouldn't be ignoring anyone but MS insiders. This is what has gotten this in the pickle they are in now...

But it doesn't matter anyway. This guy is a puppet for Gates. It will be interesting to see what Gates presses for now that he is back at the helm without the political flak.

What pickle? Have you checked out the most recent front page poll? Win 8 is beating out Win 7 by more then 2-to-1. The pickle is imaginary.

LogicalApex said,
The most important thing Microsoft needs to do right now is to listen to customers. So he shouldn't be ignoring anyone but MS insiders. This is what has gotten this in the pickle they are in now...

But it doesn't matter anyway. This guy is a puppet for Gates. It will be interesting to see what Gates presses for now that he is back at the helm without the political flak.

When I say ignore anyone not directly involved with the company, I mean for business reasons. Listening to customers is good (sometimes), but sometimes customers don't know what they want either. That's one of the most frustrating things about being a software developer, customers can be idiots sometimes and they have no clue what they're talking about.

A good example of this is one of the last companies I worked for. They have a software application that literally has "hundreds" of options and settings because "1" customer wanted it when no one else did. So there are tons and tons of options and settings in the application that 99% of the install base don't use, which has made the application a complete mess all because they didn't want to upset a customer.

With that said though, when it comes to business decisions, customers have no say in day to day operations, and they shouldn't. That's where he needs to draw the line.

IceBreakerG said,
I will offer my advice on what he "needs" to do:

1.) Ignore anyone not directly involved with the company offering "suggestions" on how to do something they have absolutely no idea about.
2.) Do what he thinks is right.

That's all.


So that means he should ignore your advice then?

Eric said,

What pickle? Have you checked out the most recent front page poll? Win 8 is beating out Win 7 by more then 2-to-1. The pickle is imaginary.

The pickle is far from imaginary. Microsoft has set its sights on the consumer market and re-branded themselves as a "device and services" company to show their bullish pursuit of that market. They haven't been able to register positively with consumers no matter how hard they try.

Microsoft knows Windows is a solid market that they won't be losing anytime soon. They are also fully aware that the computer market is growing faster than it ever has without their software. Microsoft is locked in the PC box while the explosion of devices (everything from phones to connected devices to thermostats) is killing their future growth prospects.

Remember, the stock market only rewards growth. Not stagnation. Microsoft can survive as a company on Windows and Office sales, but their stock won't grow unless they can get their teeth in the new growth markets. Microsoft needs to have its software, somehow, running on a good chunk of phones and inside connected devices to grab this growth. Windows used to have a healthy market in embedded systems in large part due to its dominance in overall computing. That future is in jeopardy.

Microsoft may benefit heavily from pushing its stuff into the "cloud" and selling it all as a service. This can be used as leverage against ISVs building on competing platforms, but this isn't the sort of win that protected Microsoft from competitive swings in the past. It is a lot harder to exert control when the only people who know your product is being used is an ISV who can technically abandon you when you no longer suits his needs.

So, the pickle is Microsoft is far from making meaningful penetration in the markets that they themselves, and everyone else, knows are key to future growth.

Eric said,

What pickle? Have you checked out the most recent front page poll? Win 8 is beating out Win 7 by more then 2-to-1. The pickle is imaginary.

Especially in the real world, where even XP beats W8 3 to 1.

nickcruz said,
Windows is more alive than ever.

Honestly, that's a bit of a stretch considering

1) Windows has steadily lost marketshare over the last decade
2) More than a third of Windows users are on a 12 year old operating system
3) 90% of Windows users are on an operating system that is at least 4 years old
4) mainstream computing and developer interest has shifted considerably to mobile devices where, as of yet, Windows is barely relevant

CJEric said,

Honestly, that's a bit of a stretch considering

1) Windows has steadily lost marketshare over the last decade
2) More than a third of Windows users are on a 12 year old operating system
3) 90% of Windows users are on an operating system that is at least 4 years old
4) mainstream computing and developer interest has shifted considerably to mobile devices where, as of yet, Windows is barely relevant

I'd have to agree with that. Windows 8 is certainly loved by a hardcore group of enthusiasts but if you look at the bigger picture, and honestly trying to put any notion of fanboy bias aside, generally Windows (not just as a product, but as an overall picture) really needs some work. The new CEO has it all to play for and I think looking at some of these articles and reading the comments on forums such as this over the last 12 months there's a couple of key areas him and his management team REALLY need to focus their attention.

LogicalApex said,

"device and services"

This. Shareholders are driving MS' decisions now. They want constant and lucrative returns. Screw solid long term investment. So MS is trying to turn everything into a ala carte or pay-as-you go service. This is driving some bad designs, and design decisions. I'm not sure it's going to change.

MS would like the OS to eventually be a subscription or micro transaction environment IMO. Office 365, revenue stream. Eventually they will make it unappealing to EA customers to not go 365. End your EA, you own nothing.

SQL moves to core licensing ala Oracle ... done, new revenue stream. It will be interesting to see where things go from here.