Mac OS X Snow Leopard reaches Golden Master

According to several sources in contact with MacRumors.com, Mac OS X 10.6 Build 10A432 has been designated as the Golden Master. This build is the final release out of the development team and will likely be the final shipping version.

Mac OS X 10.6, or Snow Leopard, represents a series of changes to the operating system for increased performance over Mac OS 10.5 or Leopard. Technologies include Grand Central Dispatch and OpenCL and now most system applications will be 64-bit. Snow Leopard is also the first Mac OS release without PowerPC support. The new build brought a number of changes with it, including the following, according to AppleInsider:

  • Although Rosetta and Quicktime 7 are both included on the Mac OS X 10.6 installation DVD, both are designated as optional installs by default. However, if Mac OS X 10.6 is being installed on a Mac that contains a registration a key for Quicktime 7 Pro, the installer will install Quicktime 7 automatically.
  • Options to "Erase and Install" and "Archive and Install" are no longer present in the Mac OS X 10.6 installer. According to those familiar with the software, this was done for convenience, so that users do not accidentally erase and install their Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard partitions. However, "Erase and Install" remains available through Disk Utility, which is also included on the installation DVD.
  • If you need to reinstall 10.6, it automatically archives and installs for you.
  • A reinstallation will not affect your Mac OS X version number. In other words, reinstallation of Mac OS X 10.6 on a Mac that contains Mac OS X 10.6.1 (when it becomes available) will not overwrite any new components delivered by 10.6.1. So when the re-install is complete, you will still be running Mac OS X 10.6.1. This will save users considerable time.
  • There is no "Previous System" folder at the root level after reinstalling.
  • If a power outage occurs, installation will pick up from where it left off.
  • To prevent the Blue Screen error that plagued some users when upgrading to Mac OS X 10.5, a software compatibility check is included that has a list of known "bad" apps, and disables them. Those programs are moved to an "Incompatible Software" folder.
  • Unlike Mac OS X 10.5, you cannot install Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard on computers where the hard drive reports a S.M.A.R.T. failure.
  • Installation initially triggers a large chunk of data to be copied from the installation DVD to the user's primary hard drive. The bulk of the installation is then managed from the hard drive, speeding up the installation process considerably. After a successful installation, that large chunk of data is automatically removed.
For Leopard users, the Snow Leopard upgrade is $29, Tiger owners will need to purchase the Mac OS X Box Set at $169. Family Pack editions for both the Box Set and standard upgrade are available as well. Snow Leopard is due in September but no specific date has been released by Apple. Both Leopard and Tiger were released late in the month, though there is no proof to suggest that will be the case this time around.

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51 Comments

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Some of you guys are really showing your "noob".

GM is a term thats been used for quite a long time... regardless of the company.

this was done for convenience, so that users do not accidentally erase and install their Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard partitions

Are you kidding? 'Erase and Install' is not the default choice and not even visible unless you go to the options screen. A user would never do this by accident unless they were randomly clicking everywhere without reading.

Now if a technically inclined person wants to erase and install they need to go through more steps. I guess that's what Apple calls convenient.

�To prevent the Blue Screen error that plagued some users when upgrading to Mac OS X 10.5, a software compatibility check is included that has a list of known "bad" apps, and disables them. Those programs are moved to an "Incompatible Software" folder.
WHAT?

Unsanity's APE application enhancer is what they're referring to. I'm assuming the Snow Leopard installer will quarantine known incompatible apps during setup.

There was an application enhancer program that caused all sorts of chaos even when still running Tiger. I had it off of my system well before upgrading to Leopard, as did a lot of others. Those that didn't got the blue screen.

Did anyone see a press release from Apple calling it Golden Master? Or did Neowin copy the same rumor all the other sites have, including the language from the original blog post that called it "golden master"? It's funny how hard some of you work to find fault with anything Apple does.

Apple doesn't issue press releases to announce they're about to start producing something... Never have. They have, however, always used GM as a term for their software just like they refer to their motherboards as "logic boards." The term itself came from CDDA's "master discs" that were generally high-quality discs used as the duplication source for CDs.

GreyWolfSC said,
Apple doesn't issue press releases to announce they're about to start producing something... Never have. They have, however, always used GM as a term for their software just like they refer to their motherboards as "logic boards." The term itself came from CDDA's "master discs" that were generally high-quality discs used as the duplication source for CDs.

http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2001/mar/07macosx_gm.html

Atlonite said,
im not going to argue with anyone we're all entitled to our opinions and apparently my opinion has me at 80% warn still

Uh ... thanks for letting us know?

Atlonite said,
im not going to argue with anyone we're all entitled to our opinions and apparently my opinion has me at 80% warn still


I got 100%, beat that!

Snow Leopard is also the first Mac OS release without PowerPC support.

Not quite correct. It is the first Mac OS X release without PowerPC support. Versions of Mac OS prior to 7.1.2 didn't have PowerPC support, only Motorola 68K support.

Wikipedia
System 7.1.2 was the first version to support PowerPC-based Macs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_history#System_7

Unless you want to get REALLY picky and note that versions prior to 7.6 wern't officially referred to as "Mac OS":
Mac OS 7.6 (name formally changed because of the experimental clone program, although System 7.5.1 and later used the "Mac OS" name on the splash screen)

People bitching about Golden Master? Have you been under a rock? It's a term used across all software platforms. Game's use it quite often as does other software and OS'. Reminds me of all the idiot americans just hollering in the news.

Apple is not releasing it to any manufacturers other than Apple itself, so it makes little sense to call it RTM I guess. Other software (games for example) is also called Golden when the code is finalized.

Apple calls all of its software Golden Master when it is finalised. It's just a part of their internal versioning and development process. Remember the GM build of OS 3.0 for the iPhone leaked? And OS 3.0 was hardly going to be burnt to a DVD and pressed, the term just means final code.

For the idiots who think Apple have just made up this term recently as a "marketing" technique need to get their facts straight:

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold_master

"Apple, Inc. can be seen using the term in a document, first written in April 1988, describing its software versioning system."

http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn/tn1132.html

A reinstallation will not affect your Mac OS X version number. In other words, reinstallation of Mac OS X 10.6 on a Mac that contains Mac OS X 10.6.1 (when it becomes available) will not overwrite any new components delivered by 10.6.1. So when the re-install is complete, you will still be running Mac OS X 10.6.1. This will save users considerable time.

Wow! Very handy! :)
Unlike Mac OS X 10.5, you cannot install Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard on computers where the hard drive reports a S.M.A.R.T. failure.

Another interesting concept. Others should adapt this IMHO, or at least warn at install with a big red sign.

I just found out the other day that Windows 7 has the "won't install on a failing hard drive" feature as well. Was going to install it on an old hard drive I had laying around to test, and it turned out that the S.M.A.R.T. status had just gone bad.

roadwarrior said,
I just found out the other day that Windows 7 has the "won't install on a failing hard drive" feature as well. Was going to install it on an old hard drive I had laying around to test, and it turned out that the S.M.A.R.T. status had just gone bad.

windows 7 also doesnt install on anything that is the "primary" hard drive, thus giving me a lot a headaches.

Why are you making such a big deal for their choice of the words 'Golden Master'. It probably comes from the fact it's gone gold and they've produced the master image.

Well, I'm not going to be a slave to any master disk. I'm an Independent Cable Select. Don't try to force your Molex on me!

RAID 0 said,
Well, I'm not going to be a slave to any master disk. I'm an Independent Cable Select. Don't try to force your Molex on me!

O M G you're SOOOoooOO funny.

virtorio said,
Why are you making such a big deal for their choice of the words 'Golden Master'. It probably comes from the fact it's gone gold and they've produced the master image.

hmm, wonder if it comes in it's one frame, with a certificate and a goldplated disk?

RAID 0 said,
Well, I'm not going to be a slave to any master disk. I'm an Independent Cable Select. Don't try to force your Molex on me!

Geekiest joke...ever

morphen said,
hmm, wonder if it comes in it's one frame, with a certificate and a goldplated disk? ;)


Those gold dics are just spray-painted and they even send them out to radio stations that play the tracks.