Man says Microsoft blocked him because of private SkyDrive folder

If you thought you were free to use all of that spacious SkyDrive storage for anything you want, think again - Microsoft is watching, even if you're using a private folder. A Dutch user learned that the hard way, when Microsoft blocked his account and basically made his Xbox, Windows Phone and Hotmail account useless.

The user, who goes by WingsofFury, discovered that his Microsoft account had been blocked without warning, and he hasn't been able to get a straight answer out of Microsoft as to exactly how he broke the EULA (that's his story, at least). He claims that all of his SkyDrive files were stored in private folders, meaning that no one but him (and Microsoft, apparently) could access them.

Assuming that everything went down as WingsofFury claims - and since there's really no way to investigate it, we can't confirm that it did -, then this would put Microsoft's practices in stark contrast with those of competitors like Dropbox. And while on one hand we can't argue with Microsoft trying to keep SkyDrive from becoming another Megaupload, it seems like what someone decides to store as a private file should be, well, private.

Take Dropbox, for example. According to their terms of service, anything that isn't specifically marked as public is encrypted, and cannot be viewed by anyone, including Dropbox staff, other than the user. Only the metadata of those files, like the name of the file, is visible to Dropbox staff, and they will only access that data when specifically requested to do so by law enforcement. Theoretically, unless you're using Dropbox for nefarious purposes, your files are your business, no matter what they are, since no one is going to request a takedown of something they don't know about.

We really love SkyDrive, but incidents like this are enough to make anyone think twice about cloud storage. On the other hand, without hearing Microsoft's side of the story, we really can't be sure that anyone is as innocent as they claim.

As SkyDrive becomes even more deeply embedded in Windows thanks to Windows 8 and upcoming services like SkyDrive Pro, it's going to be easier than ever for users to accidentally upload forbidden content to the cloud, and if things really are as WingsofFury claims, we really hope that Microsoft adjusts their policy in the future to take their user's privacy, one of their greatest assets against Google, into greater account. At any rate, it'll definitely give the cloud haters something to talk about.

WMPoweruser points out that this isn't the first time that Microsoft has blocked someone's Microsoft Account over what they put in their SkyDrive. Back in February, a German photographer was booted from the service after he stored four partially nude photos in a private folder.

Via: WMPoweruser
Source: Gathering of Tweakers (translation here)

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Interesting story..
Someone needs to shine the "Cat Signal" on Microsoft's corporate offices.

Spying on users private files and banning them from any and all products and services
for ANY type of content is pretty stupid. If the content was public I would side with MS though (probably we don't know what the content was/is)

Let them (microsoft) do all the dumb crap they want, they will feel the consequences..
Earlier today i commented on a topic why i switched to google from msn etc many years ago and it was this kinda thing right here.. I don't need Microsoft baby sitting me from the internet. THEY made google #1
If people need to stop and be worried about what they are uploading to skydrive
they may consider going to a competitor etc etc..

You know damn well they are gonna try and come up with a good excuse for this..
They know they don't want more bad publicity considering they have enough related to Windows 8.
I bet they say the person in the story uploaded 1,000's of snuff films and child porn or something lol
When in reality he probably uploaded some warez,
like oh i dunno say "Stardock.Window.Blinds.v666+Crack-GroupName.rar"

Am I the only one who would see this form of cloud storage as another marketing research angle to know about you and find out information about you easier?


Revelation 13:15-17

15 The second beast was given power to give breath to the image of the first beast, so that the image could speak and cause all who refused to worship the image to be killed. 16 It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads, 17 so that they could not buy or sell unless they had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of its name.


Sort of puts everything into perspective, don't it?

SharpGreen said,
Well I guess, I won't be using SkyDrive for anything that matters, since apparently private files aren't actually private.

Just remember we haven't heard Microsoft's side of the story so far (something we're working on).

THolman said,

Just remember we haven't heard Microsoft's side of the story so far (something we're working on).


I hope you are planning on following up on this as its an important distinction. Privacy is one of the reasons I prefer MS's cloud to the rest.

Dashel said,

I hope you are planning on following up on this as its an important distinction. Privacy is one of the reasons I prefer MS's cloud to the rest.

Believe me, I'm a big fan of SkyDrive myself, and I'm definitely going to follow up on it if we can get enough information to do so. And I agree, it's one of Microsoft's biggest advantages against Google and others, as the article points out

so, he published restricted (hell, it was probably a folder 5 GB full of cp or pirated music for all we know) content to his skydrive...then he gets mad when Microsoft disables it?
as for how Microsoft discovered the offending files, I wouldn't doubt that they implement a form of http://www.microsoft.com/en-us...09/dec09/12-15PhotoDNA.aspx that can find child porn, pirated content, and other restricted material on SkyDrive, give it to a human to confirm, and then disable the account. If he didn't want to have his account blocked, he shouldn't have violated the TOS. simple as that. Millions of people use SkyDrive legally and have no problem...it's sad IMO that when someone like this gets mad because he violated TOS, it gives Microsoft, SkyDrive, and cloud hosting in general a bad name. jm2c

Still it is weird that he used material that used to be on DropBox and blindly copied it to SkyDrive that made MS to block his account. The person did not get banned from DropBox while the content was uploaded there...

redgizzmo said,
Still it is weird that he used material that used to be on DropBox and blindly copied it to SkyDrive that made MS to block his account. The person did not get banned from DropBox while the content was uploaded there...

true, but it's possible that dropbox doesn't have as good filtering programs as SkyDrive

Matthew_Thepc said,

true, but it's possible that dropbox doesn't have as good filtering programs as SkyDrive

Or SkyDrive doesn't have a good filtering program?
Dropbox is encrypted at least.

Here's your grand "Unified" Microsoft "Final Solution" at work people.
All this Skydrive, Metro,Cloud Service and other misc crap is a dumb idea..
Would have to make you wonder when the hacking will happen.
All the cheerleaders will cry hard when all their "UNIFIED" products and services
are ALL hacked in one swoop lol

YES, Microsoft WILL snoop into your stuff, and precisely why I got rid of everything Microsoft.

I fell victim to this very same thing in ~2007. I had my photo albums in what was then Windows Live Photo Gallery and only I had permission to see them. Or so I thought. After years of the photos being there with no problems, about a week after ****ing off a Microsoft employee who was a Windows Live Community Manager, I started getting one TOS violation after another and it was pulling teeth and nails to get someone at Microsoft to detail what the violation was and what the offending material was. In once instance, it was a photo of Seattle's Gay Pride parade, but across the street, in the far background was a woman who was topless but with electrical tape on her nipples. In another instance, also a photo from a Pride parade, a guy in a crowd on the sidewalk was showing butt cheek. In none of these cases were the supposed violations the focus of the picture at all, but something unseen at the time the photo was taken and in the background. This leads me to believe that someone at Microsoft *had* to have been going through these photos with a fine toothed comb purposefully looking for a violation of TOS. Especially given that I was the only person who had permissions settings to view the pictures, or so I thought.

Yes...Microsoft employees have full access to your stuff no matter what kind of privacy settings or permissions you have on your photos, documents or files.

Chris Hill said,
YES, Microsoft WILL snoop into your stuff, and precisely why I got rid of everything Microsoft.

I fell victim to this very same thing in ~2007. I had my photo albums in what was then Windows Live Photo Gallery and only I had permission to see them. Or so I thought. After years of the photos being there with no problems, about a week after ****ing off a Microsoft employee who was a Windows Live Community Manager, I started getting one TOS violation after another and it was pulling teeth and nails to get someone at Microsoft to detail what the violation was and what the offending material was. In once instance, it was a photo of Seattle's Gay Pride parade, but across the street, in the far background was a woman who was topless but with electrical tape on her nipples. In another instance, also a photo from a Pride parade, a guy in a crowd on the sidewalk was showing butt cheek. In none of these cases were the supposed violations the focus of the picture at all, but something unseen at the time the photo was taken and in the background. This leads me to believe that someone at Microsoft *had* to have been going through these photos with a fine toothed comb purposefully looking for a violation of TOS. Especially given that I was the only person who had permissions settings to view the pictures, or so I thought.

Yes...Microsoft employees have full access to your stuff no matter what kind of privacy settings or permissions you have on your photos, documents or files.

I have to side with MS on this one. They were probably terrorist boobs and a terrorist butt cheek. I'm glad the saved me from the suicide boobs and the impending gas attack from that butt.

On the other hand. She could have been stashing cp under that electrical tape.

(I hope you know that was completely sarcastic)

What if I use a big TrueCrypt container? Or something like BoxCryptor. Is that against the TOS?

Does anyone think people in these data centers don't have free access to all the user data? I bet they have a good time browsing through people's personal data, copying (i.e. stealing) what they want.

Defcon said,
Does anyone think people in these data centers don't have free access to all the user data? I bet they have a good time browsing through people's personal data, copying (i.e. stealing) what they want.

prove it, sue them, and profit...but I personally doubt that they have free access O.O someone would tell on them

simplezz said,
Big Brother is watching. This is why I use Dropbox, well that and the fact that it has a good GNU/Linux client

Dropbox can do the same thing, and actually if you read Dropbox's code of conduct they can do much worse than SkyDrive. SkyDrive is still the best option with regards to privacy and ownership of content.

j2006 said,

Dropbox can do the same thing, and actually if you read Dropbox's code of conduct they can do much worse than SkyDrive. SkyDrive is still the best option with regards to privacy and ownership of content.

Still good to urge them to get a little better

thats really alarming.
there should be a bigger debate about the whole topic.

if someone uploads private date and doesnt share it to anyone: why on earth does MS look into my personal data?!?! and why do they delete it without any notice?!

yves707 said,
thats really alarming.
there should be a bigger debate about the whole topic.

if someone uploads private date and doesnt share it to anyone: why on earth does MS look into my personal data?!?! and why do they delete it without any notice?!


They didn't delete it, they just blocked his account until he takes action.
Also - he uploaded stuff that was against their Code of Conduct that he agreed to when signing up. They don't look into your personal data, it's just an automated checker for suspicious/illegal files.

if you read posts here they are deleting stuff!
and of course they are doing automatic checking. BUT:
this private data! why are they doing this! dropbox e.g. doesnt!
and if automatic checking finds something, i'm pretty sure they will look into your data....

j2006 said,

They didn't delete it, they just blocked his account until he takes action.
Also - he uploaded stuff that was against their Code of Conduct that he agreed to when signing up. They don't look into your personal data, it's just an automated checker for suspicious/illegal files.
Kind of hard to 'take action' when they've blocked him from doing so...

If they aren't looking but there's an automated checker then they _are_ looking. You can't know what the contents of a file are from the name alone.

yves707 said,
if automatic checking finds something, i'm pretty sure they will look into your data....

and that's a perfectly good thing. Would you rather have an automated checker go through your files, find some random photo that looks like child porn, and then suspend your account, delete your files, and call the police automatically? no - you'd want someone to actually see the photo first.

I had a similar problem with SkyDrive personal folder where they just deleted the file. I never received a warning or anything about it, one day the file was simply gone. A few months ago I made a copy of the Quicken installation CD and put it in my personal folder because I wanted to install it on my laptop at work which I did, but left the file on SkyDrive. About a week ago I went back into my personal folder to clean it out and make room for some other files and to my surprise the quicken.zip file was gone.

Why do I get the feeling this is
1. Only half the story. If it was skydrive then what files was he storing in order to get banned? Something illegal?
2. innacurate. Dropbox will be able to look at files marked private. I think they have to be able to do that by law in order to produce evidence under subpeona

and there goes my wish for a WP... yet my msn account will be a dead town until this kind a things gets resolved.
I believe according to this note that MS indeed snooped onto this user "PRIVATE UNSORTED FILES" Folder. Making pointless the use of a service like Skydrive, unless you dont care some guy at MS snoops your files.

Hidr0 said,
and there goes my wish for a WP... yet my msn account will be a dead town until this kind a things gets resolved.
I believe according to this note that MS indeed snooped onto this user "PRIVATE UNSORTED FILES" Folder. Making pointless the use of a service like Skydrive, unless you dont care some guy at MS snoops your files.

Well first you have to assume that everything stated is true, and even so, there are two sides to every story.

I'd like to know what methods Microsoft uses to police SkyDrive content. Are they actually looking into private folders or is there some type of fancy algorithmic magic going on? Will we ever know?

srprimeaux said,
I'd like to know what methods Microsoft uses to police SkyDrive content. Are they actually looking into private folders or is there some type of fancy algorithmic magic going on? Will we ever know?

I'd bet their using PhotoDNA, which is a technology Microsoft Research is developing with Facebook to detect child porn & other illegal files http://www.bing.com/search?q=p...amp;sc=8-9&sp=-1&sk=

a German photographer was booted from the service after he stored four partially nude photos in a private folder.

Pics or it didn't happen

Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.

Colin McGregor said,
Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.

The guy spoke and MS kept silent......
BTW How do you know that it was child porn and it will be released as you stated?

Colin McGregor said,
Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.

If it's child porn, why not rely on other channels to catch him on?

I still scream privacy, because I think this is a sooo lame excuse for stasi-ing the files.
"It could be illegal, so let's snoop"... Yea right... it's in their EULA, so good on them right?
No.

Microsoft doesn't have any disadvantage of being a dumb pipe, if anything, they gain the advantage of being more trustworthy.


Would you welcome HDD manufacturers screening your HDDs in realtime just because you could happen to have child porn?
It's the old song EVERYTHING gets justified with and beaten through.
It's ridonculous.

Child porn: Should it be the ultimate reason for everyone getting anal probes? No.

GS:mac

Colin McGregor said,
Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.

Right now, we really don't know what it was. Even if it was something illegal, something absolutely horrible, the fact that they found it is disconcerting - that means that they are going through everyone's files to look for something illegal. I'm not defending someone who does upload something illegal, but that is not an excuse to consider everyone guilty and go through everyone's files.

Colin McGregor said,
Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.
Kind of like that guy who was shot by the police. It was the wrong guy and wrong house. Turns out they came to his door at 1:30 AM and didn't announce themselves as police. He answered with a firearm (who wouldn't with someone knocking on your door at 1:30 in the morning) and they fatally shot him.

I guess it's all good though, right? I mean maybe he stole a candybar when he was 7. Maybe he did some LSD in his 20's. Heck, maybe he even thought about killing his boss at some point. Who knows but it's still probably a good thing that cops just shot him without cause.

Maybe you're comfortable with having something that resembles the Stasi in this country. You're fine with 'authorities' snooping wherever and whenever they want. just waltzing into your house at will. F*** you buddy, I'm not cool with it.

Colin McGregor said,
Gonna be funny when they finally release the info that it was child porn and all you "quick to scream privacy" people were sitting here defending him. I know its neowin and we should all scream privacy without knowing both sides of a story so i'll shutup now.
If it's child porn, you call the police. The problem with SkyDrive is that - especially with Office 2013 - if you so much as make a word document with a nude photo in it and save it in its default location, that's grounds to terminate your account, you lose access to all of your stored data, your phone stops working, you can't play multiplayer games, etc...

greenwizard88 said,
If it's child porn, you call the police. The problem with SkyDrive is that - especially with Office 2013 - if you so much as make a word document with a nude photo in it and save it in its default location, that's grounds to terminate your account, you lose access to all of your stored data, your phone stops working, you can't play multiplayer games, etc...

Exactly.
Now the main problem is, they promote that storage as "worry free" and "easy peasy", as a perfect synching solution for all that you can put in there, as if it was totally crazy to think people possess porn or even just nudity pics etc...

It's so ridiculous, I cannot even express how disruptive this big advertisement lie is, that everyone in their cloud hype wants to believe in.

GS:mac

Unrelated to Skydrive, but the two statements about Dropbox employees being unable to look at your information because it's encrypted, and then stating that they will look at it for law enforcement are in disagreement. They clearly hold the keys to the safe, and they therefore could look at it whenever they want. That's not to say that they might not have access restrictions in place on their end to trace their employees activity.

On the topic of Skydrive, I do wonder about what was in the private folder. I would suspect that Microsoft has automated tools running against the entire "cloud" to ensure that they are not becoming a beacon for piracy, nor for child predators. These tools most likely scan the public and private activity of users. After all, just because it's private does not mean that it cannot be shared with other users by simply providing them access down the road, nor does it mean that it's not some creepy crypt of illegal data. As such, storing demonstrably illegal things probably will never be allowed, whether or not it's a private folder.

With that said, I somehow doubt that this relates to music or movies if it's truly private just for him, and it always has been, as I don't know how Microsoft can prove that you don't have ownership, and they shouldn't assume illegal sharing if you have had the folder confined to just access for yourself. Then again, if Microsoft notices that the account is being used by multiple people in impossible ways (simultaneously in America and Europe for example), then clearly it's not really private just for him, and it's probably just a shared login.

Those are just ideas. I do hope that Microsoft isn't just willy-nilly blocking people because they store question MP3s in their private folders. I don't want ripping of music to be a reason to block account(s).

pickypg said,
Unrelated to Skydrive, but the two statements about Dropbox employees being unable to look at your information because it's encrypted, and then stating that they will look at it for law enforcement are in disagreement. They clearly hold the keys to the safe, and they therefore could look at it whenever they want. That's not to say that they might not have access restrictions in place on their end to trace their employees activity.

On the topic of Skydrive, I do wonder about what was in the private folder. I would suspect that Microsoft has automated tools running against the entire "cloud" to ensure that they are not becoming a beacon for piracy, nor for child predators. These tools most likely scan the public and private activity of users. After all, just because it's private does not mean that it cannot be shared with other users by simply providing them access down the road, nor does it mean that it's not some creepy crypt of illegal data. As such, storing demonstrably illegal things probably will never be allowed, whether or not it's a private folder.

With that said, I somehow doubt that this relates to music or movies if it's truly private just for him, and it always has been, as I don't know how Microsoft can prove that you don't have ownership, and they shouldn't assume illegal sharing if you have had the folder confined to just access for yourself. Then again, if Microsoft notices that the account is being used by multiple people in impossible ways (simultaneously in America and Europe for example), then clearly it's not really private just for him, and it's probably just a shared login.

Those are just ideas. I do hope that Microsoft isn't just willy-nilly blocking people because they store question MP3s in their private folders. I don't want ripping of music to be a reason to block account(s).

Not necessarily, they may be able to reset a password and thus gain access but not 'snoop' - as in the only way in would be very obvious and obtrusive

duddit2 said,
Not necessarily, they may be able to reset a password and thus gain access but not 'snoop' - as in the only way in would be very obvious and obtrusive
I assume that you are referring to my comment on Dropbox.

If so, that's not how it works. If they can unlock it for police without effecting you, then they can unlock it for themselves without effecting you. I'm not saying that they are a scummy, lying company, but I do feel the need to point out that just because it's encrypted by them, that does not mean that they cannot view it considering that they hold the keys to the encryption.

I don't see where in the article that Microsoft blocked his account because of Skydrive usage other than mere conjecture. They locked out ALL of his services, why does he blame Skydrive?

billyea said,
I don't see where in the article that Microsoft blocked his account because of Skydrive usage other than mere conjecture. They locked out ALL of his services, why does he blame Skydrive?

agreed; I don't see why he thinks it was SkyDrive (but I assume he probably contacted them and asked)

Does this not make Microsoft lose their safe harbour status? If they are actively policing the service then doesn't that put them at risk to being a bigger target towards the media industries?

Unless he uploaded a file like 'Day.Of.The.Dead.1985.AXXO.avi' or something equally as suspicious, I'd not be happy with MS. However, where would he stand if he uploaded a legally acquired digital film (Like something off iTunes for example)?

I don't know what the EULA is like for SkyDrive because quite frankly I have no need to use any service like that at the moment. Anything that I need stored online is generally small enough to go on an e-mail account. However, apart from someone mentioning 'nudity', what else is a no-no?

From the EULA... pretty straightforward and reasonable in my opinion:
http://windows.microsoft.com/e...indows-live/code-of-conduct

You will not upload, post, transmit, transfer, distribute or facilitate distribution of any content (including text, images, sound, video, data, information or software) or otherwise use the service in a way that:

• depicts nudity of any sort including full or partial human nudity or nudity in non-human forms such as cartoons, fantasy art or manga.

•incites, advocates, or expresses pornography, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity, hatred, bigotry, racism, or gratuitous violence.

•misrepresents the source of anything you post or upload, including impersonation of another individual or entity.

•provides or creates links to external sites that violate this Code of Conduct.

•includes content that is protected by intellectual property laws, rights of privacy or publicity, or any other applicable law unless you own or control the rights thereto or have received all necessary consents.

•is intended to harm or exploit minors in any way.

•is designed to solicit, or collect personally identifiable information of any minor (anyone under 18 years old), including, but not limited to: name, email address, home address, phone number, or the name of their school.

•invades anyone's privacy by attempting to harvest, collect, store, or publish private or personally identifiable information, such as passwords, account information, credit card numbers, addresses, or other contact information without their knowledge and willing consent.

•is illegal or violates any applicable local and national laws; including but not limited to child pornography, bestiality, incest, illegal drugs, software piracy, and harassment.

•threatens, stalks, defames, defrauds, degrades, victimizes or intimidates an individual or group of individuals for any reason; including on the basis of age, gender, disability, ethnicity, sexual orientation, race or religion; or incites or encourages anyone else to do so.

•harms or disrupts, or intends to harm or disrupt, another user's computer or would allow you or others to illegally access software or bypass security on Web sites, or servers, including but not limited to spamming.

•attempts to impersonate a Microsoft employee, agent, manager, host, administrator, moderator, another user or any other person through any means.

•promotes or otherwise facilitates the purchase and sale of ammunition or firearms.

•contains or could be considered 'junk mail', 'spam', 'chain letters', 'pyramid schemes', 'affiliate marketing' or unsolicited commercial advertisement.

•mischaracterizes content you post or upload or contains the same or similar content to other content you have already posted.

•attempts to manipulate the services, including ranking and reputation systems in the services, by violating any of the provisions of this Code of Conduct, colluding with others on voting or using multiple profiles.

•offers to make international money transfers for amounts exceeding the asking price of an item, with intent to request a refund of any portion of the payment.

•contains advertising for money making schemes, discount cards, credit counseling, online surveys or online contests.

You will not use any form of automated device or computer program that enables the submission of postings without the express written consent of Microsoft Corporation.

Coagulated said,
where would he stand if he uploaded a legally acquired digital film (Like something off iTunes for example)?

As long as your not sharing then moving your legally purchased stuff is fine. I have a few hundred legally purchased mp3s in private skydrive folders, i did research first and found a comment on microsoft answers asking the question and a moderator says its ok.

j2006 said,
• depicts nudity of any sort including full or partial human nudity or nudity in non-human forms such as cartoons, fantasy art or manga.

Lol. I didn't know this part of the EULA. I've had a bunch of images 19th century art, which includes paintings and sculptures of nude figures, on my account of years. (Made during a time when people were more concerned with modesty and propriety than they are today) If they don't intend to target people like me, they should really change the EULA.

Remember the old days of deposit boxes at the bank. On;y you had the key to it. The bank didn't look in it. It was guaranteed privacy and the bank honored that regardless of what they thought you may or may not be putting in it. No bomb detectors, no drug dogs, no x-ray machines. Just privacy.

WTF happened to this planet.....

KCRic said,
Remember the old days of deposit boxes at the bank. On;y you had the key to it. The bank didn't look in it. It was guaranteed privacy and the bank honored that regardless of what they thought you may or may not be putting in it. No bomb detectors, no drug dogs, no x-ray machines. Just privacy.

WTF happened to this planet.....

Paranoia on an unheard of scale.

KCRic said,
Remember the old days of deposit boxes at the bank. On;y you had the key to it. The bank didn't look in it. It was guaranteed privacy and the bank honored that regardless of what they thought you may or may not be putting in it. No bomb detectors, no drug dogs, no x-ray machines. Just privacy.


WTF happened to this planet.....


People decided they needed to know what you were doing for your own 'safety'

Isn't the cloud great? It's probably gone gone too, not just blocked.

I'll keep hosting/storing my stuff on my own server, with my own internet connection.

shockz said,
Isn't the cloud great? It's probably gone gone too, not just blocked.

I'll keep hosting/storing my stuff on my own server, with my own internet connection.


I highly doubt it's gone gone. His account was blocked not removed. I'm sure they're probably just waiting for him to confirm a warning or something or take some sort of action to remove the content before being able to access it again.

j2006 said,

I highly doubt it's gone gone. His account was blocked not removed. I'm sure they're probably just waiting for him to confirm a warning or something or take some sort of action to remove the content before being able to access it again.

No, they're not, Microsoft is not even responding to the guy, which is typical of them.

I really can't believe it either. He must have shared it first with someone and then later made it private. And if those folders contained any copyrighted material which can't be distributed, he broke the EULA. Microsoft would have been within their rights in blocking his skydrive!

He said it was one folder of 10-12GB of UNSORTED content, he may have made it private after it finished syncing, but that isn't clear.

Neobond said,
He said it was one folder of 10-12GB of UNSORTED content, he may have made it private after it finished syncing, but that isn't clear.

that's definitely a possibility....But I guess there is a need for more accountability on the part of Microsoft in such matters even if they were right in this particular case....more the people get dependent on cloud based services, more they will expect a certain level of accountability, especially if they are paying for it!

I find it amazing you can lose EVERYTHING over what can amount to a simple mistake.

What isn't mentioned (from the Dutch site) is that this guy also has a Windows Phone, so turning off ALL of his services basically made his phone pointless as well, seeing as everything is tied in to your Microsoft Account.

Surely there's a better way to resolve incidents like this?

Neobond said,
I find it amazing you can lose EVERYTHING over what can amount to a simple mistake.

What isn't mentioned (from the Dutch site) is that this guy also has a Windows Phone, so turning off ALL of his services basically made his phone pointless as well, seeing as everything is tied in to your Microsoft Account.

Surely there's a better way to resolve incidents like this?

I agree 100%.

Neobond said,
I find it amazing you can lose EVERYTHING over what can amount to a simple mistake.

What isn't mentioned (from the Dutch site) is that this guy also has a Windows Phone, so turning off ALL of his services basically made his phone pointless as well, seeing as everything is tied in to your Microsoft Account.

Surely there's a better way to resolve incidents like this?

While there are better ways to resolve incidents like this, he did agree to the EULA by signing up. Also, to keep the amount of bad accounts down, I can see why they want to be strict with this.

The phone wouldn't be deemed useless though, he just wouldn't be able to access live services such as SkyDrive, Hotmail, Xbox Live and the marketplace.

j2006 said,

The phone wouldn't be deemed useless though, he just wouldn't be able to access live services such as SkyDrive, Hotmail, Xbox Live and the marketplace.

Yeah, the guy probably only got a WP because of the tied in services, so it would feel useless If my Apple ID ever got banned I don't think my iPhone would be any good anymore (no updates etc) I'd have to jailbreak it lol.

Neobond said,
I find it amazing you can lose EVERYTHING over what can amount to a simple mistake.

What isn't mentioned (from the Dutch site) is that this guy also has a Windows Phone, so turning off ALL of his services basically made his phone pointless as well, seeing as everything is tied in to your Microsoft Account.

Surely there's a better way to resolve incidents like this?

No, this is the future that 'they' want. Mess up one time, they make everything connected to it useless. I have a skydrive and dropbox account, but EVERYTHING I upload to them are encrypted with 256 bit aes. Only I know the key, and it is not written down anywhere. I don't store anything illegal online, nor local, but no one has a right to know what I use their services for, be it paid or free. If they ever get ****ed about it being encrypted I will just remove the content and stop using the service. Its not hard.

Neobond said,

Yeah, the guy probably only got a WP because of the tied in services, so it would feel useless If my Apple ID ever got banned I don't think my iPhone would be any good anymore (no updates etc) I'd have to jailbreak it lol.


What good is an iPhone anyway if it isn't jailbroken?

I seriously cant imagine MS snooping into someones private folders, not ruling it out but deffo smells fishy to me

duddit2 said,
I seriously cant imagine MS snooping into someones private folders, not ruling it out but deffo smells fishy to me

I agree. I don't think they snoop, but they probably have automated measures that looks for suspicious content.

duddit2 said,
I seriously cant imagine MS snooping into someones private folders, not ruling it out but deffo smells fishy to me

I deffo dislike this new deffo term...

xfx said,

I deffo dislike this new deffo term...

haha its not even 'internet talk' its just a slang word used around Manchester UK, re reading it I agree its annoying - I'm usually a grammar Nazi!

Why doesn't Microsoft just remove the file and warn the user? It seems overkill to just destroy the entire account over a few pirated files. Also, apparently you cant even put up artwork that contains any form of nudity, why isn't it just limited to porn?

Omen1393 said,
Why doesn't Microsoft just remove the file and warn the user? It seems overkill to just destroy the entire account over a few pirated files. Also, apparently you cant even put up artwork that contains any form of nudity, why isn't it just limited to porn?

They don't destory the account. They cut off access to the SkyDrive account by telling the user that the account has been shut down and telling the user how to resolve the issue. When the user is done jumping through hoops to regain access they are provided about 24 hours to remove the offending content. If not the account is shut down again.

Had a similar incident with a public folder one time. It definitely made me wary and did make me wonder if they are doing the same with private areas (which they should not be policing - they don't do that with email). As more stuff becomes associated with the Live ID, it does make me nervous.

here's the thing...... anything posted to the internet isn't "secure" someone somewhere can probably see it even if its in the company that hosted it... unless you encrypted it before posting it.... how about we just use personal storage for stuff like that? then no one to "ban" you for doing it...

neufuse said,
here's the thing...... anything posted to the internet isn't "secure" someone somewhere can probably see it even if its in the company that hosted it... unless you encrypted it before posting it.... how about we just use personal storage for stuff like that? then no one to "ban" you for doing it...

See, the thing is that Microsoft touts their service as HIPPA compliant. If a nurse/doctor violates HIPPA, that's grounds for immediate termination. Given that the service is supposed to be that secure, there's no reason why Microsoft should be able to access his private folders.

neufuse said,
here's the thing...... anything posted to the internet isn't "secure" someone somewhere can probably see it even if its in the company that hosted it... unless you encrypted it before posting it.... how about we just use personal storage for stuff like that? then no one to "ban" you for doing it...

So, you've never used a credit card online?

greenwizard88 said,

See, the thing is that Microsoft touts their service as HIPPA compliant.

They do? Where? SkyDrive is not HIPPA compliant last I checked.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Exactly. Plus, it's in the EULA, they should've known.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Seriously?

I have things on online storage that I don't really want joe bloggs searching on google to find or some random nosey person poking in to everyones skydrive account just so they can see what they can find, so I can access them on different internet equipped devices without having to have a local copy on each device.

I'm sure you'd love someone poking around in your mailbox at your house looking at all your letters, if you have nothing to hide of course.

You really are a Microsoft apologist arent you....

TheLegendOfMart said,

Seriously?

I have things on online storage that I don't really want joe bloggs searching on google to find or some random nosey person poking in to everyones skydrive account just so they can see what they can find, so I can access them on different internet equipped devices without having to have a local copy on each device.

I'm sure you'd love someone poking around in your mailbox at your house looking at all your letters, if you have nothing to hide of course.

You really are a Microsoft apologist arent you....

How is that being a Microsoft apologist? By uploading something on a company's servers that breaks their EULA, then they have the right to suspend your account.

Also, they don't snoop around people's private stuff... like they have time to snoop every user's account. They most likely have automated measures that look for suspicious content and suspend the account until they confirm or deny it's true.

Microsoft did nothing wrong, that guy did for breaking the code.

I never said Microsoft did anything wrong, Dot Matrix automatically assumes that the guy has something to hide because he wanted to keep his documents private away from the general public, it cant possibly be Microsoft at fault.

TheLegendOfMart said,

Seriously?

I have things on online storage that I don't really want joe bloggs searching on google to find or some random nosey person poking in to everyones skydrive account just so they can see what they can find, so I can access them on different internet equipped devices without having to have a local copy on each device.

I'm sure you'd love someone poking around in your mailbox at your house looking at all your letters, if you have nothing to hide of course.

You really are a Microsoft apologist arent you....

The only information available to the public is what I put in my Public folder (duh), but that doesn't mean my other folders aren't open. They are online after all. Sitting in some data center, filled with employees, who are doing only God knows what right now.

If "Joe Bloggs" wants in, he'll get in.

First rule of online security. If you don't want it seen, don't put it online. PERIOD.

Dot Matrix said,

The only information available to the public is what I put in my Public folder (duh), but that doesn't mean my other folders aren't open. They are online after all. Sitting in some data center, filled with employees, who are doing only God knows what right now.

If "Joe Bloggs" wants in, he'll get in.

First rule of online security. If you don't want it seen, don't put it online. PERIOD.


So your stance is that he should leave everything open and available for everyone to see because if hes uploading it he should expect that people will be able to get it regardless?

Do you even listen to yourself?

He put it online so he can access it on all his devices, he put it private so that some random person cant just stumble across his files.

TheLegendOfMart said,
I never said Microsoft did anything wrong, Dot Matrix automatically assumes that the guy has something to hide because he wanted to keep his documents private away from the general public, it cant possibly be Microsoft at fault.

Not necessarily true, he said if you have something to hide don't put it on the internet. That still means you can upload private confidential data on the internet in private folders, but it's always a risk regardless of where you upload it. Just like password breaches on LinkedIn and most other sites in the news lately. If you have illegal content (which you should 'hide' if you choose do that) or nude photos (which breaks the code), then you shouldn't post them online unless you are willing to accept the risk of getting caught.

j2006 said,

Not necessarily true, he said if you have something to hide don't put it on the internet. That still means you can upload private confidential data on the internet in private folders, but it's always a risk regardless of where you upload it. Just like password breaches on LinkedIn and most other sites in the news lately. If you have illegal content (which you should 'hide' if you choose do that) or nude photos (which breaks the code), then you shouldn't post them online unless you are willing to accept the risk of getting caught.

This is what I was getting at.

Don't blame Microsoft, blame everybody. There is little privacy on the Internet, and even that isn't a guarantee.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Since when "Private" is synonimous of illegal or unlawful?

TheLegendOfMart said,

Seriously?

I have things on online storage that I don't really want joe bloggs searching on google to find or some random nosey person poking in to everyones skydrive account just so they can see what they can find, so I can access them on different internet equipped devices without having to have a local copy on each device.

I'm sure you'd love someone poking around in your mailbox at your house looking at all your letters, if you have nothing to hide of course.

You really are a Microsoft apologist arent you....

Not surprising as this happened to me. I created a folder in my SkyDrive account so one of my friends could get the ones he wanted from my collection of still porn pics. I marked the folder private so only he and I could access it and within about a week my account was blocked.

When I realized what happened I knew why and I didn't mind removing the pics but It took an awful lot of back and forth with Microsoft techs to understand why because one group sees the account as open while the compliance group sees it as blocked. But I give Microsoft plenty credit for allowing me to remove the offending pics and retain my account.

I thought adult porn was ok to put in my SkyDrive account but thats not the case. I'm guessing anything that can be considered offensive is off limits.

Edited by NPGMBR, Jul 19 2012, 5:05pm :

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Wow... that's a slippery slope my friend.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

I love the way that you twist everything so that it's not Microsoft's fault but the user's. If companies offering cloud based security are ever to be taken seriously they should make the data stored on their cloud completely safe, and they shouldn't block people's accounts without at least giving them a chance to get their data back first or explaining what rules exactly they are supposed to have broken.

Although I prefer Google drive anyway, this has confirmed my decision not to use Skydrive, sadly a lot of Windows 8 users are going to end up not knowing there are alternatives and also lose their data to Microsoft's poor service.

Javik said,

I love the way that you twist everything so that it's not Microsoft's fault but the user's. If companies offering cloud based security are ever to be taken seriously they should make the data stored on their cloud completely safe, and they shouldn't block people's accounts without at least giving them a chance to get their data back first or explaining what rules exactly they are supposed to have broken.

Although I prefer Google drive anyway, this has confirmed my decision not to use Skydrive, sadly a lot of Windows 8 users are going to end up not knowing there are alternatives and also lose their data to Microsoft's poor service.

You're only getting half the story. I know from first hand experience that Microsoft does tell they user why the account was blocked and also gives the user an opportunity to correct the problem. At least that was the case for me.

Javik said,

I love the way that you twist everything so that it's not Microsoft's fault but the user's.

Don't worry... Dot Matrix is a joke (or he works for Microsoft). I've never seen a worst fanboy before

Dot Matrix said,

First rule of online security. If you don't want it seen, don't put it online. PERIOD.

That's getting to be harder and harder these days, though. TBH, in the future it'll probably eventually get to the point where almost all of peoples' possessions will be stored online. Does that mean you should take away people's right to hide stuff from others? No, and that's why encryption is such a great thing. Someone has to stop people like the NSA from tryimg to break it, though... (Hint: Neowin had an article where they said the NSA had cracked the AES encryption method...)

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

or just don't put it on skydrive, which clearly spies on your files. that should be their marketing line actually, why don't you work for MSFT? They are in need of somebody who will make sure nobody uses their products and you're just about what they need kudos.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Yea i suggested the same idea on another article a couple weeks ago.. You don't EVER suggest this around these people. They go off on you..

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

re read the story again..

he said his files were private and only viewable by him

and obviously by the like's added to your comment
a lot of people are also not even reading the first paragraph.
come people smarten up ..

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

Or you store your junk on a service where no one (not even the people who own the service) but you can access it.

I am Not PCyr said,

re read the story again..

he said his files were private and only viewable by him

and obviously by the like's added to your comment
a lot of people are also not even reading the first paragraph.
come people smarten up ..

If you store your files on other people's servers, they're ALWAYS viewable by that party. If you don't want other eyes on your files, than they shouldn't be online.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.
Wrong. If you have something to hide, put it in an AES-encrypted zip or 7-zip or something archive.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

The problem is that with the new Windows 8, the integration with "cloud services" can be so seamless that the user's photos might be automatically synced. This is why I am not so keen about this whole "cloud revolution". Who the f* Microsoft think they are to tell me what sort of (legal) pictures we can and can't have?

Dot Matrix said,

They are online after all. Sitting in some data center, filled with employees, who are doing only God knows what right now. PERIOD.

Yes but that isn't the point is it. Its one thing for admins to have access, its quite another for them to be actively looking and acting on private content. Whats next, its ok if they pull a Facebook and start scanning our emails for illegal activity too? Its a ridiculous notion that will only work against their otherwise fantastic platform.

Dot Matrix said,
If you have something to hide, don't put it online to begin with.

I think the Dutch gentleman, WingsofFury, is trying to say that he had nothing to hide that was illegal or in contravention of the EULA.
What is missing from this debate is facts; from all sides....