Member of Anonymous reveals himself

The Anonymous hacker group has been busy in the last several months. The group has received a lot of media attention for its various attacks on web sites and its anti security (AntiSec) views (you know you have hit the big time when The Daily Show makes fun of you). But one member of the group has apparently had enough of its antics and has decided to not only call it quits but to denounce the leaders of his group for their decisions and actions.

News.com reports that the person previously known by his handle "SparkyBlaze" has now gone public as a UK-based resident named Matthew. In his first message as an ex-Anonymous member, which was posted over at Pastebin.com, he says, "Over The Past Few Months Things Inside Anon Have Changed. I Am Mostly Talking About AntiSec And LulzSec. They Both Go Against What I Stand For (And What Anonymous Says They Stand For)."

LulzSec is the name of another hacker group that for 50 days essentially ripped through the Internet, attacking both government and business web site and also releasing lots of personal data from some of those attacks. Anonymous has done the same in the past year. But Matthew believes that these actions are not what these groups should be about. He says, "AntiSec Has Released Gig After Gig Of Innocent Peoples Information. For What? What Did They Do? Does Anon Have The Right To Remove The Anonymity Of Innocent People? They Are Always Talking About Peoples Right To Remain Anonymous So Why Are They Removing That Right?"

It looks like Anonymous has already disavowed Matthew as one of its known members, "Commander X", has posted up word that Matthew has been disloyal to Anonymous. However the group hasn't commented on Matthew's actual comments.

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I operate on the strict belief that no two people can possibly agree 100% on their opinions. So I'm pretty entertained by the Anonymous apologists who act as if the group does no wrong, stands for something righteous, and agrees with everything they say and do. If a criticism comes out against Anonymous, these strange apologists appear and write lengthy opinions disagreeing with the criticisms and ultimately spinning an interpretation of Anonymous' behavior that makes them look justified.

That anyone out there would agree 100% with everything Anonymous has done stinks of group think and is probably a result of having no strong principles they've come to on their own, so instead choose to adopt the principles of others (which really is the only way anyone can fully agree with anyone else in the first place).

Don't be afraid to criticize or disagree, and if you feel compelled to beat down people who do, keep it mind that it just makes you look like a sheep yourself.

I'm hearing lot of things about Anonymous these days and I've been wondering, do they make any money for doing these hacks/attacks etc? or they simply do it out of fun just to expose how unsafe are the websites such as the PSN Network who got hacked on the same day of it's relaunch.

Congrats Matthew! Get out while you can. I don't think any of the recent hacking is what it should really be about. Anonymous should be defending the exact nature of people remaining anonymous online, like protecting people from falling victim to the exact things that they are doing. People should be able to download whatever they want with their internet connection without the fear that they are breaking the law, and to be able to do it anonymously without anyone knowing; whether its software, music, games, movies, pr0n, or what have you...

This whole Anonymous thing reeks of the US intelligence agencies. I wouldn't be surprised if every single one of them are government operatives.

scratch42069 said,
This whole Anonymous thing reeks of the US intelligence agencies. I wouldn't be surprised if every single one of them are government operatives.

So, are we arresting government operatives?

AtriusNY said,
I think it is the Chinese mafia.

In fact, most hackers are involved with the russia mafia or work alone or in small groups.

He's got a bit of a point doesn't he?

I'm not even against the IDEA of what they're doing. I'm all for letting big companies know that they have major security flaws that puts the privacy of their users in danger, but I don't understand why these people feel the need to take away the privacy of the innocent users that they're supposedly trying to protect.

Amarok said,
He's got a bit of a point doesn't he?

I'm not even against the IDEA of what they're doing. I'm all for letting big companies know that they have major security flaws that puts the privacy of their users in danger, but I don't understand why these people feel the need to take away the privacy of the innocent users that they're supposedly trying to protect.


That wasn't their intent. They weren't trying to help the companies at all; rather, they wanted people to realize that companies have a lot of information on them, and that they're not responsibly safeguarding it. We all know it; it seems like every year there's a story about how some laptop with the unencrypted personal details of thousands of customers is lost, but that seems somewhat distant. When random companies were falling daily, and people's information was getting tossed up indiscriminately, it made the average person wonder if they could be next.

I haven't thought it through enough to say whether I agree or disagree with their tactics. However, the facts are that if they were able to do things like this, then people who actually wanted the information to abuse it (identity thieves and such) were certainly able to do it, too. If this causes the world to take security more seriously (which includes people being careful of what details they give to companies), then it will have been for the better.

You sure this guy isn't just desperate for attention? I've heard of Sabu, Topiary, Jester, TFlow and Kayla, so I pay a fair amount of attention to random hacker antics, but this name isn't ringing a bell at all...

we need to stop treating Annonymous like an organization, and more like an idea which lends itself well to ego-stroking on the internet

carmatic said,
we need to stop treating Annonymous like an organization, and more like an idea which lends itself well to ego-stroking on the internet
I sorta like anon but if you actually look, there are many groups of them rather than one group. And also they dont agree on one idea, just a rough idea, some support illegal practices, other dont. it makes them stronger

I thought everyone who capitalised the first letter of every word had been killed.

So Over The Past Few Days I Have Been At A Cross road With Anonymous. Why? Because I Started To Think.

Or maybe he just grew up a wee bit?

what said,
I thought everyone who capitalised the first letter of every word had been killed.

Or maybe he just grew up a wee bit?

Only The Uber Kewl Kids Type Like This. Lol.

what said,
I thought everyone who capitalised the first letter of every word had been killed.

Or maybe he just grew up a wee bit?


It is a John Callaham article... Good thing we can read his bio also immediately after every article

what said,
I thought everyone who capitalised the first letter of every word had been killed.
Or maybe he just grew up a wee bit?

Yeah no kidding, why do people still do that? It's super annoying and childish.