Microsoft: 59 Internet Explorer vulnerabilities patched in June

On the second Tuesday of every month, Microsoft releases patches for its products and this month is no different. While the Surface 2 and Pro 2 will be getting some enhancements by the way of firmware updates, Internet Explorer is patching a rather large number of vulnerabilities.

Microsoft said on its IE blog today that they are patching 59, yes 59, vulnerabilities; there were two publicly disclosed vulnerabilities and fifty-seven privately reported vulnerabilities. If you needed a reason to make sure you were actively patching your system, this post alone should warrant your attention to do so.

If you are wondering how many vulnerabilities were reported in previous months to help gauge if 59 vulnerabilities was high, for the month of May there were two privately reported vulnerabilities, six vulnerabilities for April, 18 for March and 24 for February

The good news is that these issues have now been patched and for a machine that is updated, are no longer an issue. While the number is quite high this month in terms of vulnerabilities, we still prefer how open Microsoft is about the process each month and the fact that they do not try to hide these figures.

If you want to learn more about what was patched, you can read the full list here.

As Microsoft works to make Internet Explorer more secure, the company is also pushing the abilities of its browser and has teamed up with ESPN to create a World Cup portal

Source: Microsoft

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Now, if Microsoft could fix the IE11 installer problem(s), so those of us with IE10 on 64-bit machines could update, that would be appreciated.

I've tried both using the MS Update mechanism and also trying to download the IE11 update directly from MS's web site. Both way fail. The Update Troubleshooter doesn't fix the problem, The error codes vary, which don't help tracking down the problem. The best I get is "one or more files may be missing or corrupt." YET, I'm not given the name of the missing or corrupt file. Even a "Repair" from the installation DVD doesn't fix the problem. Am I going to spend $99 to have MS fix their problem? Hardly. Roaming through the Internet, there are many listings with lots of other people having problem attempting to install the IE11 update over IE10. Clearly, the is an Update bug for that application.

"we still prefer how open Microsoft is about the process each month and the fact that they do not try to hide these figures."

Google and mozilla both post how many security vulnerabilities were patched too. Mozilla and chrome are open source too so you can't give microsoft too much credit.

torrentthief said,
"we still prefer how open Microsoft is about the process each month and the fact that they do not try to hide these figures."

Google and mozilla both post how many security vulnerabilities were patched too. Mozilla and chrome are open source too so you can't give microsoft too much credit.

But many companies attempt to hide this as well. The credit wasn't necessarily credit they didn't/wouldn't give Chrome/Mozilla either. But those tools being open source there is less incentive/posibilities to hide it.

Non Security bug fixes with this month patch Tuesday...
2965905 Element disappears in edge mode of Internet Explorer 11
2965686 Application performs slowly when using HttpOpenRequest function or Windows.Web.Http.HttpClient class to send HTTPS requests
2965525 Cannot store new autocomplete values in Web Browser control host applications in Internet Explorer 11
2964869 Applications hosting Internet Explorer 11 do not zoom correctly when the system DPI is larger than 300%
2964867 Applications hosting Internet Explorer 11 do not zoom correctly when the system DPI is between 150% and 300%
2964865 The file name is invalid error message when you upload OneDrive placeholder files in Internet Explorer 11 for the desktop
2964864 Decrease the default cache size from 250 MB to 50 MB for Internet Explorer 11 on low disk space devices
2964862 Mouse events are not always triggered for SVG content in Internet Explorer 11
2964861 Roamed pinned sites are not live in the immersive mode of Internet Explorer 11
2964857 Frame content is zoomed out in a new window when you reopen the frame in Internet Explorer 11
2964854 Page goes back without warning when you click the back navigation button in Internet Explorer 10 or Internet Explorer 11
2964851 webpage could not be saved error when you save a webpage in Internet Explorer 10 or Internet Explorer 11
2964850 Status bar text disappears when window resizes, tab switches, or other status bar layout changes in Internet Explorer 11
2964846 Search suggestions are not displayed when you type in the address bar in Internet Explorer 9 or Internet Explorer 10
2964845 Send Feedback link is added to Reading View rendered content in Internet Explorer 11
2964844 Viewport is not redrawn when you change the emulation resolution in Internet Explorer 11
2956283 Internet Explorer 11 crashes when you turn on or turn off Enterprise Mode in the Tools menu
2955390 BranchCache service does not work for Internet Explorer 10 or Internet Explorer 11 in Windows 7
2955388 Private bytes keep increasing when the deleteRow or deleteCell method is called in Internet Explorer
2955387 Persistent cookies are not roamed in Internet Explorer 11 or Internet Explorer 10
2954771 Additional blank lines are displayed in an HTML document in Internet Explorer 10
2935514 Internet Explorer 9 crashes when you print a webpage by using Print Preview
2935492 64-bit application cannot load Adobe Reader ActiveX control when the computer uses Internet Explorer
2854645 No such interface supported error when you open a file through an FTP network location in Internet Explorer 11 or Internet Explorer 10

It sure makes you feel good knowing that IE has so many vulnerabilities being eliminated, right? And surely it's because it's such a popular browser and a major target for "security researchers" and that's why so many vulnerabilities are being found and reported, right? That's the real reason, and everything else like Chrome, Firefox and Opera has vulnerabilities too, IE is not exceptional, right? Hundreds of serious security vulnerabilities within a year's time is acceptable for a widely used web browser, definitely.

Do you feel safe using this piece of crap to browse internet websites? Seriously?

An exceptionally high number for this month, yes.

Overall IE compares well with other browsers on the security front.

You do realize that Firefox and Chrome can have more issues, right. In face, tere have been found 3 time more issues in Chrome - a 6 year old browser - the in IEs full lifespan.

Studio384, don't believe every piece of BS you read on sites like this one. Overall issues include bugs unrelated to security and the report and handling process by Google is fundamentally different than Microsoft's. If you've had the displeasure of using IE since its earliest versions, you know that it along with activex has been responsible for by far most of the world's computer virus infections. IE has always been a piece of crap, it still is, and no one should use it.

audioman said,
If you've had the displeasure of using IE since its earliest versions, you know that it along with activex has been responsible for by far most of the world's computer virus infections.

That honour goes to Flash, Java, Reader, etc.

audioman said,
Studio384, don't believe every piece of BS you read on sites like this one. Overall issues include bugs unrelated to security and the report and handling process by Google is fundamentally different than Microsoft's. If you've had the displeasure of using IE since its earliest versions, you know that it along with activex has been responsible for by far most of the world's computer virus infections. IE has always been a piece of crap, it still is, and no one should use it.

Yet I see you linking no reports of your own or any other hard facts other than we should just take your word for it. Every browser and software has quirks and such, also pre-fixing is all the rage with Chrome, because we want another IE6 on our hands.

audioman said,
Studio384, don't believe every piece of BS you read on sites like this one.

Yes, sites where people prefer facts to rhetoric are terrible and noone should ever visit them. If you actually had conflicting data you'd give us links and try to prove it.

Don't be ridiculous, Eric. You know how Secunia "counts", they're known to have trouble with that concept, not to mention their bias and no real mention of the actual severeness of anything, unless it suits them.

audioman said,
Don't be ridiculous, Eric. You know how Secunia "counts", they're known to have trouble with that concept, not to mention their bias and no real mention of the actual severeness of anything, unless it suits them.

You're free to provide contradictory information. Your original post doesn't contain any. It's just a rant against IE. Personally, I've used it since 1.0 when it came with Plus Pack 95 and never had a problem with it.

Here is Mozilla's list: http://www.mozilla.org/securit...ulnerabilities/firefox.html
I couldn't find an official list for Chrome.

audioman said,
Don't be ridiculous, Eric. You know how Secunia "counts", they're known to have trouble with that concept, not to mention their bias and no real mention of the actual severeness of anything, unless it suits them.

Wow Secunia can't count the vulnerabilities, sure they can't :rolleyes:

I'm sure if Chrome was lower than IE you'd be using the exact same statistic and going LOOK SEE CHROME IS BETTER.

Pot calling the kettle black?

Too bad we're talking about vulnerabilities here, which Secunia doesn't bundle together then right? Its also surprising that in the past 2 - 3 pwn2own contests every single person said that IE was extremely difficult to break into if the default security measures are left enabled. They said that EVEN THOUGH they were eventually able to break in.

And hilarious bias to MS products? For the longest time IE was constantly listed as the most vulnerable browser, it wasn't until IE9/10 that things started to change.

If you like to claim that Secunia's numbers are full of ######, then provide your own numbers instead of just BSing out your ass.

Edited by zhangm, Jun 11 2014, 2:46am :

No, YOU try again, I only commented about the stupid myth of Chrome "having more security vulnerabilities in its short lifespan than in all of IE's lifespan". You can keep ignoring the glaring issues with Secunia's false reporting, wrong numbers and glaringly idiotic overall process and lack of integrity.

audioman said,
You can keep ignoring the glaring issues with Secunia's false reporting, wrong numbers and glaringly idiotic overall process and lack of integrity.

I'm only ignoring your claims which you still haven't managed to back up.

audioman said,
Studio384, don't believe every piece of BS you read on sites like this one. Overall issues include bugs unrelated to security and the report and handling process by Google is fundamentally different than Microsoft's.


what the hell are you smoking?
vulnerabilities count in Google Chrome are about vulnerabilities, not bugs.

nobody counts non-security bugs as vulnerabilities.

furthermore, google has published a study that claims its browser is the most secure despite the same study recognizing that Chrome had actually more flaws than IE (at that time, IE's sandbox was less efficient than Chrome's, but that has changed since Win8).
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2...e_firefox_security_bakeoff/

oh, and the same study say that IE's security is better than firefox's.



If you've had the displeasure of using IE since its earliest versions, you know that it along with activex has been responsible for by far most of the world's computer virus infections.


oh lord. People who talk about ActiveX infection are people who don't know what ActiveX are.

ActiveX controls are no different than NPAPI plugins.

a security flaw in the Flash Player control in IE is exactly as dangerous as the same flaw in the NPAPI Flash Player plugin used by Firefox.


IE has always been a piece of crap, it still is, and no one should use it.

your mouth is full of crap, and none of what you said make any sense. You must be proud of you I guess.

Great job, if they can fix 59 vulnerabilities in 1 month. :) Sure is a high number, great that they are patched. Meanwhile, I'm looking forward to IE12.