Microsoft acquiring Canesta, maker of motion sensing technology

It would seem that Microsoft has decided to go full steam ahead in the motion sensing world. Canesta, a company that creates gesture control devices, has announced on their corporate website that they will be acquired by Microsoft. 

Canesta CEO and president Jim Spare had this to say about their deal with Microsoft:

This is very exciting news for the industry. There is little question that within the next decade we will see natural user interfaces become common for input across all devices. With Microsoft’s breadth of scope from enterprise to consumer products, market presence, and commitment to NUI, we are confident that our technology will see wide adoption across many applications that embody the full potential of the technology.

Canesta's motion sensing technology has been featured in Playstation's EyeToy and they signed an agreement with Hitachi last year to incorporate the technology into TVs as demonstrated in the video below. 

With the Kinect just a few days away from being released, Microsoft is already looking to improve in the area of motion detection. This is a pretty bold move on Microsoft's part, and even though pre-orders for the Kinect have sold out at places like Best Buy and Amazon, there is no indicator if the device will succeed once it gets into the hands of the users. It will be up to Microsoft to encourage game developers to make quality games that take advantage of motion sensing technology. Otherwise, there will be little interest in the technology. 

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15 Comments

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Along with the advances already made my MS this is only going to help continue pushing AR and spatial computing out as a viable system. Iron Man type Jarvis systems to play with anyone? Hell yes! I say bring it on, I can't wait

LOL I'm sorry but that looks so stupid to me (the dude waving his hand around like that)
I'd rather use the remote.

este said,
LOL I'm sorry but that looks so stupid to me (the dude waving his hand around like that)
I'd rather use the remote.

Then the technology is not for you. My son for instance, has fine motor issues, he cannot operate a remote. His gross motor skills are better. I am eager for a technology that empowers him, enabling him to control the television.

My aging grandmother cannot see all the buttons on the remotes they make today. Instead of an embarassing novelty remote that has keys the size of my hand, she can just wave around.

Not all technology is for every customer. The people in my life need this technology, and I want to be the one to bring it to them.

este said,
LOL I'm sorry but that looks so stupid to me (the dude waving his hand around like that)
I'd rather use the remote.

Agree, be it a normal remote or (if motion sensing is an issue) some combination. Like the PS Move... It is more efficient and faster being able to use buttons for some basic tasks like confirm/cancel actions.

este said,
LOL I'm sorry but that looks so stupid to me (the dude waving his hand around like that)
I'd rather use the remote.

100% correct. This motion sensing gimmick is a solution looking for a problem.

dotf said,

Then the technology is not for you. My son for instance, has fine motor issues, he cannot operate a remote. His gross motor skills are better. I am eager for a technology that empowers him, enabling him to control the television.

My aging grandmother cannot see all the buttons on the remotes they make today. Instead of an embarassing novelty remote that has keys the size of my hand, she can just wave around.

Not all technology is for every customer. The people in my life need this technology, and I want to be the one to bring it to them.

I suppose you are right. I mean I like the direction this technology is headed but.. this just looks like a joke almost. But yes for the other examples you listed above I agree, they could be helpful to some users. Personally, I would use a nice all-in-one remote or some sort of tablet pc (iPad would work) with the full interface on it to control my TV and peripherals. But this technology is still new so lets see where it goes from here..

so let me guess, Primesense develops the 3d camera, and Canesta handles what is normally done by the games now, i.e. interpreting the data from the 3d camera

i wonder how does this tie in with the 64 million dollar R&D spending that was in microsoft's books...

carmatic said,
so let me guess, Primesense develops the 3d camera, and Canesta handles what is normally done by the games now, i.e. interpreting the data from the 3d camera

i wonder how does this tie in with the 64 million dollar R&D spending that was in microsoft's books...

My guess: patents. If Canesta has important patents it might be better to just buy Canesta and get even more expertise.

carmatic said,
so let me guess, Primesense develops the 3d camera, and Canesta handles what is normally done by the games now, i.e. interpreting the data from the 3d camera

i wonder how does this tie in with the 64 million dollar R&D spending that was in microsoft's books...

It don't matter..this is great..to see Microsoft have such great aspirations for this type of technology.

yardman said,

It don't matter..this is great..to see Microsoft have such great aspirations for this type of technology.

I agree, the future for this should be interesting. And hey, if they get a good number of patents in the process it's a win-win.

GP007 said,

I agree, the future for this should be interesting. And hey, if they get a good number of patents in the process it's a win-win.

Win win for them and Microsoft, it is not a win for competitors who want to use motion tracking.

Omen1393 said,

Win win for them and Microsoft, it is not a win for competitors who want to use motion tracking.

Thats true but its nothing new. This is how companies acquire patents to technologies they don't invent themselves.