Microsoft adds "Do Not Track" to IE9 RC

Amidst bureaucratic wrangling and legal arguments in the upper echelons of the world’s legislative bodies, Microsoft has decided to take matters into its own hands when it comes to ‘do not track’ web browser functionality. In the first release candidate (RC) of IE9, Microsoft is rolling out two options that enable the users to be proactive in deciding which websites are allowed to track them and to what extent they are allowed to track. Microsoft explains the new functions in a video:

The release comes on the heels of an extensive Federal Trade Commission (FTC) report that discussed the idea of DNT lists in a lot of detail. Microsoft is attempting to answer many of the questions and suggestions that the report brought up.

On the IE team, we’ve asked similar questions and want to make progress operationally as well as in the public discussion. We want to develop (as the recent FTC report put it) “more effective technologies for consumer control” and make progress on the report’s recommendation of “a browser-based mechanism through which consumers could make persistent choices” regarding tracking. Today, we’re offering an early look at a way to enable operational progress in the privacy discussion.

The two new tools are Tracking Protection Lists and Tracking Protection. Tracking Protection is simply an opt-in function that enables users to be more vigilant in discovering who or what is tracking their activity and visits to any given website. A Tracking Protection List is a publically shareable list of websites that your browser will not request data from unless explicitly requested from the user. For example, when you visit abcd.com, content from 1234.com may be tracking you via an embedded image. If 1234.com is in your TPL, this content will be blocked, and will not be allowed to track you. However, the list doesn’t block the actual website from being browsed. You can still can still browse 1234.com directly if you wish to.

Microsoft emphasizes that, while these privacy measures are definitely a step forward in the never ending dialogue of browser privacy, “the web lacks a good precise definition of what tracking means.” In other words, they aren’t trying to create any kind of standard here. This is more of an experiment to see of such functionality would meet user needs and wants when it comes to opt in options for privacy on the web.

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Can't believe people are actually excited about a new version of "Internet Explorer". I must be out of touch.

...Obviously not going to try it though;)

SuperHans said,
Can't believe people are actually excited about a new version of "Internet Explorer". I must be out of touch.

...Obviously not going to try it though;)

It might actually be a good browser.

the new UI looks worse, it looks like they are taking steps toward the metro, squarish, UI but, I don't know if it'll catch the way its implemented here

"First" RC? I hope MS aren't planning numerous RC's ahead of time again? *sigh*
That would make it much easier to know what to expect of the software you're testing.

RC = Release Candidate. A version meant to be released as the final version, and only not released if some surprise bugs were found.

Chrome New Privacy rules:

Do not track, launch DDoS attacks on websites you don't want tracking
Rem-Lo TVG, a TV Guided missile, useful for "smiting where they stand"
War room, A handy bunker for hiding from the neighbors after your TVG knocks down their chimney
Stalk, Built in google function, we know where you live

Auzeras said,
Chrome New Privacy rules:

Do not track, launch DDoS attacks on websites you don't want tracking
Rem-Lo TVG, a TV Guided missile, useful for "smiting where they stand"
War room, A handy bunker for hiding from the neighbors after your TVG knocks down their chimney
Stalk, Built in google function, we know where you live


This article is about IE, not Chrome.

osm0sis said,
So is this an update to InPrivate Filtering or still exist seperately? Subscriptions! Can't wait..

I also wonder about the difference here.

lets hope they add a customizable interface because seriously i prefer the good old ie8 interface over ie9 and ie7

The Protagonist said,
bye bye google ads

This can potentially affect Google Analytics as well. I guess it's time to start looking for a better analytics solution that can't be affected by these types of changes.

ie9 said,
And a different tab UI?

It looks like they just made them more square, no rounded corners, and took away the transparancy. Unless I'm missing something.

GP007 said,

It looks like they just made them more square, no rounded corners, and took away the transparancy. Unless I'm missing something.

That's what I meant. They also have an 'x' on a tab even if it's the only one open. I think it looks great and hope they include this in the RC

ie9 said,
And a different tab UI?

Indeed, tabs are different!
I just hope they don't make IE look too blocky... hmm, still not the best design.

They need to revamp IE add ons. Firefox and Chrome are running away with that. It's hard to consider IE over Firefox for that reason alone.

OceanMotion said,
They need to revamp IE add ons. Firefox and Chrome are running away with that. It's hard to consider IE over Firefox for that reason alone.
It shouldn't be too hard considering IE 9 will be the fastest browser ever, and the first one to offer hardware rendering.

OceanMotion said,
They need to revamp IE add ons. Firefox and Chrome are running away with that. It's hard to consider IE over Firefox for that reason alone.

I don't use extentions or add-ons aoutside of Flash/SL and maybe one or two other streaming tV related add-ons. For users like me I don't much care about all the extentions etc FF and Chrome have.

OceanMotion said,
They need to revamp IE add ons. Firefox and Chrome are running away with that. It's hard to consider IE over Firefox for that reason alone.

E.g. Firefox, How many users not use Firefox any longer, because e.g. one addon consume too much CPU power? Users click around on the Addon page, install something, browser not work very well any longer, Result: They use another browser, they not fiddle around with each addon to find the fool. In my opinion a large amount of addons make a lot of problems too.

OceanMotion said,
T..Chrome are running away with that.
I stop reading right there. To say that people use Chrome for its retarded addons system is like defending sarah palin's intelligent. Chrome's addons is nothing more than userscripts and they are nowhere close to allow the developers do what they want like that of Firefox. Chrome can't even block ads with their fake adblock plus extension to begin with.

De.Bug said,
It shouldn't be too hard considering IE 9 will be the fastest browser ever, and the first one to offer hardware rendering.

Chrome already has hardware rendering support in the latest stable build.

flexkeyboard said,
I stop reading right there. To say that people use Chrome for its retarded addons system is like defending sarah palin's intelligent. Chrome's addons is nothing more than userscripts and they are nowhere close to allow the developers do what they want like that of Firefox. Chrome can't even block ads with their fake adblock plus extension to begin with.

Chrome can block by far most ads before they're loaded, but not all. Chrome supports the onbeforeload event. Chrome's Adblock extension makes use of this "new" functionality. Chrome also has a built-in content blocker that supports wildcards with black+whitelists, both for Flash, Javascript, and more. Furthermore, Chrome has built-in click-to-play support for e.g. Flash. Update yourself with a couple of months old news, please.

Lastwebpage said,

E.g. Firefox, How many users not use Firefox any longer, because e.g. one addon consume too much CPU power? Users click around on the Addon page, install something, browser not work very well any longer, Result: They use another browser, they not fiddle around with each addon to find the fool. In my opinion a large amount of addons make a lot of problems too.

Sorry but that's just a weak and ludicrous argument there.

It is nice that users don't have to enable it everytime they start IE 9 as it is required for IE 8.

Microsoft likes to include quality add-ons in their own software. Plus for them. However, they should make the 3rd party add-on a lot easier to develop for. This will help build competition and through that, make better security features.

That being said, this looks like a good add-on, and thus good all around feature.

ccoltmanm said,
Microsoft likes to include quality add-ons in their own software. Plus for them. However, they should make the 3rd party add-on a lot easier to develop for. This will help build competition and through that, make better security features.

That being said, this looks like a good add-on, and thus good all around feature.

I don't know if you can call this an add-on, isn't it built into the browser itself from the get go? Like the popup blocker, download manager, InPrivate mode and so on, just another added feature to the mix OOTB.

I do agree though, it'd be nice if they redid the add-on system and maybe used something like say SL to let people add things to IE.

GP007 said,

I don't know if you can call this an add-on, isn't it built into the browser itself from the get go? Like the popup blocker, download manager, InPrivate mode and so on, just another added feature to the mix OOTB.

I do agree though, it'd be nice if they redid the add-on system and maybe used something like say SL to let people add things to IE.


oh you mean like ActiveX?
I've seen quite a few quality addons in ActiveX... however few are free/publicly

ccoltmanm said,
Microsoft likes to include quality add-ons in their own software. Plus for them. However, they should make the 3rd party add-on a lot easier to develop for. This will help build competition and through that, make better security features.

That being said, this looks like a good add-on, and thus good all around feature.

Actually it's not that difficult to write add-ons for IE and it has been possible since IE 4 (if I'm not mistaken). The myriad of browser toolbars are just one example of that. However, noboy bothers to make quality add-ons it seems

TDT said,

I was about to ask the same question. It would be very nice.

I don't know if malania is asking for IE to have adblock plus. I read it as "doesn't adblock plus offer this sort of functionality anyway?". Known websites are blocked and you can add any others to the list that you'd like to stop tracking you via an image by not allowing it to load.