Microsoft claims no involvement in raid of hacker who leaked next-gen Xbox info

Though he was visited by a Microsoft official prior to his recent raid, the hacker who leaked information about the next-generation Xbox gaming console wasn't raided on Microsoft's request – at least that's what the company is saying.

According to a new report from Kotaku's Stephen Totilo, the hacker known as SuperDaE was met by a Microsoft intellectual property official in recent months. The visit followed leaks about Microsoft's next gaming console, supposedly codenamed "Durango," as well as eBay listings by the hacker of a developer version of the console. The Microsoft official, Miles Hawkes (whose LinkedIn profile can be viewed here), asked SuperDaE how he was able to gain access to information on the company's servers.

The hacker claims that by gaining access to Microsoft's servers, he was able to create an account to the company's Xbox Developer Program website. He then ordered a developer version of the console using the fake account, he says.

While little new information is given in the article, Totilo states that SuperDaE told him he preferred the Durango to Sony's recently announced PlayStation 4 console, which the hacker also leaked information about prior to its announcement.

For its part, Microsoft claims no involvement in the recent raid by Australian police and the FBI. A Microsoft representative provided Kotaku with the following statement on the matter: "Microsoft did not initiate this FBI investigation with this individual, as has been asserted in some of the articles in the media. We take security very seriously and have no evidence of any compromise of our corporate network. We have no further comment on this matter."

Microsoft's next-generation Xbox is rumored to be announced sometime in early April. Leaked hardware information indicates a significant upgrade to the company's Kinect motion tracking hardware as well as an eight-core processor from AMD, 8GB of DDR3 RAM, a Blu-ray drive and custom DirectX 11 GPU.

Source: Kotaku

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Well they should tho. That **** deserved it even if it wasn't Microsoft directly who signed off on it.

Although this begs to question if it might have been AMD who started the investigation in the first place because of the semi-custom APU inside the box.

Highly unlikely it had anything to do with AMD.

He hacked Epic's servers a few years ago. Think it might have been this that started it off, as he actually PHONED them and told them him did it.

Lmao I love theses hackers. Some pocket protector nerd in moms basement with a pc not in a case and wearing an antistatic belt drinking orange juice and eating powdered doughnuts hacking into Sony and MS, lmao.

Thats right. All computer advancements are the result of one uneducated introvert stuck in their folks basement who loves carbs...

srbeen said,
Thats right. All computer advancements are the result of one uneducated introvert stuck in their folks basement who loves carbs...

Well allot did, didn't Gates start in a basement/garage?
Same for Jobs IIRC.

mrdeezus said,
Lmao I love theses hackers. Some pocket protector nerd in moms basement with a pc not in a case and wearing an antistatic belt drinking orange juice and eating powdered doughnuts hacking into Sony and MS, lmao.

You're taking Hollywood way too seriously bro.

Hacker's first rule : anonymity.
So when a so called hackers fail the first rule then, is it a real a hacker?.

meh only the crap and bad hackers get caught just saying. dumb ass ordering a console. sounds a good idea until you go to collect it....

I had a boss once, you would ask if he wanted something done, and he would just look at you in a way that gave you your answer. I don't trust any billion dollar company as I've yet to see one that doesn't wield it's power in ways that don't make me sick.

so it turned out he liked the next xbox more than the ps4. I wonder what Microsoft have in store looking forward because the PS4 didn't hit my interest.

Huge following? $$$-maker xbox live? Kinect technology? Keep confidential information confidential? Microsoft's ability to write fast code for slower hardware, and make pretty & functional software?

Theres a lot of things the current xbox does much better than the PS3 can. Should I want to be social the LAST thing I would look to is my game console.

I do find it incredibly funny that the 360 was the quickest and easiest to 'pirate' on, yet it is the best selling console of all-time. MS never went after those folks who released DVD flashes, tools, Degrader software/hardware, JTAG hack code, Xell, RGH or anything, and Sony went after those folks who released RESERCH found on the console, like graf chokolo and george hotz.

I am also disappointed by sony's terrible PS4 rushed announcement.

Edited by srbeen, Feb 23 2013, 11:21pm :

srbeen said,

I do find it incredibly funny that the 360 was the quickest and easiest to 'pirate' on, yet it is the best selling console of all-time. MS never went after those folks who released DVD flashes, tools, Degrader software/hardware, JTAG hack code, Xell, RGH or anything, and Sony went after those folks who released RESERCH found on the console, like graf chokolo and george hotz.

Neither would Sony if the root keys would not have been posted online.
Sony used to be a fan of 'hacked' systems and allowed/supported it until after the PS2 launch.
Thanks to Geohotz their whole Division could go down by it, do remember publishers are not happy of releasing games where they wont get any profits from due to everyone hacking the place.

MS took a different approach, not only weren't their root keys that would throw open their entire security at risk, the system needed a hardware 'hack' to be able to play pirated games.
Also I'm sure thanks to the piracy able 360, MS won a large part of the console marketshare.

What? MS consoles were wide open since 2007 via King Kong shader exploit. For those wanting Xbox live it was 2006 when you could drive flash and play pirated backups online. MS leveraged this hack to sell more online-stuff (subscriptions, games, DLC, xbla, etc) and ban users once in a while to keep console sales up. They shut down the king kong 4532 kernel hack, which resurfaced up to firmwares 7371 via a degrader, which was locked down again until 12625 firmware/RGH release, which is still wide open for getting CPU keys from the console. While technically possible, phats get no love anymore and been locked out since 14719, but every one can be easily drive flashed.

Sony never embraced hacking, Microsoft did. Sony fined divineo $9M for selling their DMS modchips and shut down a LOT of PS2 chip resellers. I never seen this action taken with the xbox or xbox 360. XBMC devs & hackers were invited to MS headquaters to discuss the console actually...

Geohots hack did NOTHING to take down the division. Graf's research could be used, but still required a LOT of work to understand, comment, and discover what needed to be done. What brought sony down, partly in 2010, was the folks who released the PSjailbreak USB dongle on firmware 3.40/3.41, which was a completely different exploit based around enabling piracy via a plug and play usb stick. Geohots exploit was dead in the water above 3.21 anyway, despite how useless it was to begin with, but this PSjailbreak allowed loading a good amount of games via USB drive. You could speculate they used geohots exploit to discover the buggy USB driver the PS3 used, or some other method like a dev console from eBay. Its discovery/development was never revealed.

Sony of course acted, but too late, as coders figured out the signing bug (biggest flaw of a tech company this century) at 27C3 hacking conference and reversed to get the private keys required to sign any firmwares up to the release at the time, 3.55. This in thanks to the jailbreak dongle that put the console in a qazi-dev mode that allowed all kinds of programmers/hackers/developers more access to their DRM'd system. Sony fixed their static random number generator, enacted new keys in LV0 loader in 3.56+, and HW redesigned and enabled LV0.2 keys in ALL newly made consoles, (still not exploited) and these reversed keys were now essentially useless again. (biggest save of a tech company this century) Hackers work continued to discover the master decryption LV0 key, which recently got released because of chinese hackers trying to profit by selling custom-made console specific custom firwares. Essentially the PS3 was 'secure' from launch until 2012, with a few tricks/hacks that were quickly patched. Even today there are still titles that you can't pirate/won't play on the PS3 without heavy persuasion. The 360 could play a pirated copy of disc-based games since 2006 and EVERYTHING since 2007..

With LV0 key we can decrypt all new firmwares forever, as Sony can't change LV0 key in consoles that have it, and with the signing bug we can move these decrypted files into a 3.55 firmware package, sign it, and install it via software without issue to play newer games. If you were patient you needed to do nothing but apply system updates to pirate on the PS3. if you were impatient, 45 wire chip install would be needed, which isn't easy.

TL;DR - PS3 was crushed by LV0 key release which sony never went after anyone for. Sony did go after people for ram glitching and releasing detailed info on the system itself, neither of which played free games or prevented LV0 key from becoming public. MS never did, which aligns with this article.

Edited by srbeen, Feb 24 2013, 1:48pm :

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