Microsoft continues to call out Chromebook shortcomings, offers alternatives

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Google's Chromebooks may not have the largest market share but that isn't stopping Microsoft from targeting the devices and showing why you should stick with a Windows machine. In a new(ish) webpage on the Microsoft store, Microsoft holds nothing back in calling out Chromebooks.

Microsoft has created a section on its store that matches up Chromebooks against similarly priced laptops liked the Dell Inspiron 15 ($249) and the Acer Aspire E 15 ES1 ($249); its intent is to show that there are more capable machines at the same price point as the devices running Google's OS.

With large banners calling out Chromebooks by name and the fact that Microsoft call the alternative Windows laptops "PCs without limitations" shows their stance on the Google-backed devices. Specifically, they say: "On a Windows PC, you can run Office, iTunes and Photoshop. You can't do that with a Chromebook". 

Sure, it's easy to say that Chromebooks don't really present a threat to Windows machines since they are well entrenched in the consumer and enterprise markets - but at one point, not all that long ago, Android had 0% market share and the same can be said about Chrome. Knowing that Google has the capability to quickly steal market share from entrenched competitors, they are not wasting time in going after these Chromebooks.

Of course, the devices that Microsoft is offering up are low-end and do have that 'netbook' feeling to them. But, one of the machines shown on the site, the 'ASUS Transformer Book T100Ta Gray Signature Edition 2 in 1 PC' (yes, that is the entire product name and it is ridiculously long) does have a 4.25/5 rating on the site. The device does cost $349 but it appears that the majority of users who do buy the device are happy with their purchase.

If you have a Chromebook, let us know in the comments below how well it is working for you.

Source: Microsoft

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