Microsoft creates guide to help move iOS apps to Win 8

Microsoft knows that it is entering the tablet market late and because of that it needs to help developers migrate from existing platforms to their own. The natural target for this would be iOS as that segment has the largest market share and the developer community that Microsoft hopes to tap.

To that end, Microsoft has put together a guide to help developers migrate from iOS to their Windows 8 environment. The post can be found here (via Michael Gillett) and we have included some of the highlights below.

The general gist of the post is that iOS and Windows 8 accomplish the same task with different perspectives. For this, Microsoft created a comprehensive guide to break down each feature and show how iPad functionality is performed within Windows 8.

The application used for the walkthrough purposes is a photo journal that allows the end user to view and manages their photos online within a timeline. There are several areas that Microsoft focuses on such as search, content manipulation, navigation, and gesture support.

It should not surprise you that Microsoft also sneaks in a few reasons why Windows 8 is better than iOS for applications and it also shows in their images with what is noticeably larger screen than the 9.7in iPad. Of course, you have to remember that iOS is purely a mobile OS whereas Windows 8 is both a desktop and tablet OS.

If you are a Windows 8 developer and have previously worked with iOS, the guide should prove to be valuable in drawing parallels between the two platforms to better optimize your application and improve workflow. 

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If the Windows 8 marketplace takes off (for PCs, not mobile), I will definitely consider porting my games. The potential market for Windows games is huge

Rudy said,
....

Your attempt at making a distinction has you at a disadvantage. The Windows Store is for ALL win8 devices. who cares what platforms they are, just port your damn game for us already!!!!!!

Rudy said,
If the Windows 8 marketplace takes off (for PCs, not mobile), I will definitely consider porting my games. The potential market for Windows games is huge

While it isn't confirmed (or it might be?), there are indications that apps will run on multiple devices or will be encouraged to. So, if you develop for PC, may as well tweak it to run on mobile.

laserfloyd said,

While it isn't confirmed (or it might be?), there are indications that apps will run on multiple devices or will be encouraged to. So, if you develop for PC, may as well tweak it to run on mobile.

If by mobile he means tablets and WOA devices then any WinRT app will run on them, it's been confirmed already by MS. Once you write a Metro (WinRT) app it'll run on any Windows 8 PC/Tablet etc. Besides why wouldn't you want to target mobile devices?

GP007 said,
If by mobile he means tablets and WOA devices then any WinRT app will run on them, it's been confirmed already by MS. Once you write a Metro (WinRT) app it'll run on any Windows 8 PC/Tablet etc. Besides why wouldn't you want to target mobile devices?

And the differences between WinRT and Silverlight for Windows Phone 7.5 isn't that much either. You will be able to support both with relative ease on the same codebase. There is a talk from BUILD last year which talks using the DP version of Metro to create cross platform apps between WP and W8.

I suspect WP8 will use WinRT, although no one has confirmed this, to my knowledge.

dotf said,

And the differences between WinRT and Silverlight for Windows Phone 7.5 isn't that much either. You will be able to support both with relative ease on the same codebase. There is a talk from BUILD last year which talks using the DP version of Metro to create cross platform apps between WP and W8.

I suspect WP8 will use WinRT, although no one has confirmed this, to my knowledge.

I also think WinRT or a "lite" version of it for WP8 could happen, it wouldn't surprise me in the least really.

ray_bk said,
I start moving away from Windows a few years ago.
I enjoy my iPad so much!
I am not a fool to move back!

Yah, you tell em!

ray_bk said,
I start moving away from Windows a few years ago.
I enjoy my iPad so much!
I am not a fool to move back!

How is your post even slightly relevant to this topic?

ray_bk said,
I start moving away from Windows a few years ago.
I enjoy my iPad so much!
I am not a fool to move back!

I move away from windows during bad storms but that's about it.

ray_bk said,
I start moving away from Windows a few years ago.
I enjoy my iPad so much!
I am not a fool to move back!

Good. So while we are ysing tablets that run run applications, you can continue with your toy with those itty bitty apps.

People made fun of the iPad's large borders when it first came out, but once you've used one, you realize how much sense they make. Any smaller, and it would be uncomfortable to try to hold and handle the tablet without accidentally touching the screen all the time.

CJEric said,
People made fun of the iPad's large borders when it first came out, but once you've used one, you realize how much sense they make. Any smaller, and it would be uncomfortable to try to hold and handle the tablet without accidentally touching the screen all the time.

While I'm no huge fan of iOS you are absolutely right. The border is very important. I've found the Samsung Slate I have is right on the edge of how small a border can be w/o it being encumbering.

greenwizard88 said,
I'm pretty sure Windows has the ability to determine the difference between a touch and holding the tablet. So thick borders are useless.

You're wrong.

MrHumpty said,

You're wrong.

Original Language - Sarcasm:
Whoa hold the press! We have a guy who has extensively used Win8, the final version, on a tablet! Please tell us how you managed to go half a year into the future, the world is waiting!!!

Translation from Sarcasm to English: Shut up.

Razorfolds said,
Original Language - Sarcasm:
Whoa hold the press! We have a guy who has extensively used Win8, the final version, on a tablet! Please tell us how you managed to go half a year into the future, the world is waiting!!!

Translation from Sarcasm to English: Shut up.


Let me see if I can spell it out. They support 8 points of touch on the screen on my Samsung Slate. To believe that they will intelligently know that the tablet is being held by points of touch rather than just "being touched" is a high level confiscation of the ability of developers to extend the API, MS is not known for doing anything like that.

More importantly, MS has said they will only control first pixel (edge of the screen). That is the only input they commandeer from the Developer in the chromeless interface.

I'm pretty certain I can say "you're wrong" armed with the above knowledge and the fact I've been using a Samsung Slate with Dev & Consumer Previews daily as my primary machine.

;tldr; I know more than you, apparently.

I dislike how on win8 you have to be aware of all the gestures/shortcuts while on iOS things like search and years are clearly on the screen as part of the UI. i would have never pinched to zoom out on that win8 app without being shown once...theres nothing there to suggest theres hidden functionality

Co_Co said,
I dislike how on win8 you have to be aware of all the gestures/shortcuts while on iOS things like search and years are clearly on the screen as part of the UI. i would have never pinched to zoom out on that win8 app without being shown once...theres nothing there to suggest theres hidden functionality

My 19month old already understands pinch to zoom. In Windows 8 a very prominent way to increase the scope of anything is to zoom out. I've already become used to just trying it on an app to see if I can increase scope.

Most of what people think are hidden and power user gestures are only that way for the first day or two with the device, after that they are incredibly natural on Win8. I would imagine hints and tutorials will be part of the initial Windows experience.

Co_Co said,
I dislike how on win8 you have to be aware of all the gestures/shortcuts while on iOS things like search and years are clearly on the screen as part of the UI.

I dislike how people who are indoctrinated in unintuitive ways of using technology cannot see that something is natural.

I bet every single tablet owner at one time or another has accidentally swiped a thumb in from the edge. In W8 that's discoverability. In other OSes, it does nothing.

Any guesses on that screen size Microsoft is showing? It looks like a 13.3in screen roughly which means they are showing iOS against the desktop version of metro.

bdsams said,
Any guesses on that screen size Microsoft is showing? It looks like a 13.3in screen roughly which means they are showing iOS against the desktop version of metro.

*shrugs* It just looks like a standard widescreen tablet chrome - although desktop Metro is exactly the same as tablet Metro so that makes no difference anyway

For what it's worth, it looks like it fits the same on screen as the simulator set at 10.6" display at 1366x768.

bdsams said,
Any guesses on that screen size Microsoft is showing? It looks like a 13.3in screen roughly which means they are showing iOS against the desktop version of metro.

There is only one version of metro. Secondly, assuming that the two have about the same size short edge and the windows screen has an aspect ratio of 16:9, then it's roughly a 12" screen

pack34 said,

There is only one version of metro. Secondly, assuming that the two have about the same size short edge and the windows screen has an aspect ratio of 16:9, then it's roughly a 12" screen

And that's even assuming whomever wrote the article was making any attempt to keep the dimensions of the iPad and the W8 tablet in proper scale which is doubtful, it just looks like they just wanted to make them the same vertical height for neatness.

The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?

butilikethecookie said,
The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?

There will be different size devices, and Win8/metro is much cleaner in design than iOS.

butilikethecookie said,
The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?

There will be different size devices, and Win8/metro is much cleaner in design than iOS.

butilikethecookie said,
The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?

To me, Metro looks the "cleaner" of the two.

butilikethecookie said,
The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?
No iOS is not. Since Windows 8 will be on larger mobile device that exceed 10", that means more stuff will fit on the screen at one time, this eliminates a lot of drop downs and submenus and navigating through 5 levels of screens when you coudl do it all in 1 level or maybe 2. Learn something please. Stop being a fanatic and learn to be logical.

butilikethecookie said,
The iPad's UI is cleaner and easier to navigate than Windows 8's at this current time. I would not want to carry around a tablet as large as the Microsoft one.....or is that just a monitor?
No it isn't. You're just blind. iOS app are force to have 5 levels of screens or menus because of screen size. because the Metro UI scrolls, that means more can fit on a single level. Grow up and open your eyes.

TechieXP said,
No iOS is not. Since Windows 8 will be on larger mobile device that exceed 10", that means more stuff will fit on the screen at one time, this eliminates a lot of drop downs and submenus and navigating through 5 levels of screens when you coudl do it all in 1 level or maybe 2. Learn something please. Stop being a fanatic and learn to be logical.

TechieXP said,
No it isn't. You're just blind. iOS app are force to have 5 levels of screens or menus because of screen size. because the Metro UI scrolls, that means more can fit on a single level. Grow up and open your eyes.

Did you just reply 2 different replies to the same person?

Co-ords said,
Why would I want to do that?????
You're right, adding so many question marks does make your intelligent and well thought out point come across better???????????????

Co-ords said,
Why would I want to do that?????

Because developers like money.
Why would a company NOT want to port over apps to millions of potential customers?

butilikethecookie said,

It's WINDOWS. 90% of the people on earth use it. That means more $$$$$$$$ for you.

Metro style apps only run on Windows 8, which more or less 0% of the people on earth are currently using.

CJEric said,

Metro style apps only run on Windows 8, which more or less 0% of the people on earth are currently using.


Yeah, but in a year or two, that'll be up to 50%. Compared to Apple's what, 5%?

CJEric said,

Metro style apps only run on Windows 8, which more or less 0% of the people on earth are currently using.


The assumption that the majority of new computer purchases will be transferred to Apple is a much more logical assumption.

greenwizard88 said,

Yeah, but in a year or two, that'll be up to 50%.

Even Windows 7 is currently below that...so we'll see, I guess. It also remains to be seen how many people really want to run Metro apps on their desktop or laptop computers.

MrHumpty said,

The assumption that the majority of new computer purchases will be transferred to Apple is a much more logical assumption.

Don't forget that Apple already sold more iPads in a quarter than any other computer manufacturer sold PCs.

CJEric said,

Don't forget that Apple already sold more iPads in a quarter than any other computer manufacturer sold PCs.

Tablets aren't Computers. Everybody I know that has a tablet has a computer. That stat is irrelevant.

CJEric said,

Don't forget that Apple already sold more iPads in a quarter than any other computer manufacturer sold PCs.

And how many custom build PC's has been sold in that time ? I never, ever had computer from manufacturer. All where build by me. I don't know anybody that buys computers from manufacturer's like HP, DEC. All people I know build their computers or asked friends to build them for them.

This is PC world. Not Mac that you can buy just from one source.

MrHumpty said,

Tablets aren't Computers.

If you say so. My only point is that it will take a looong time for MS to build a similarly large tablet user base as iOS has (assuming they ever catch up). We'll see how well MS's strategy of leveraging their desktop user base will work for the Metro ecosystem.

MrHumpty said,

Tablets aren't Computers. Everybody I know that has a tablet has a computer. That stat is irrelevant.

I am going to assume you ment to say desktop computers because tablets are pc/computers by any modern definition of the term.

That being said, it is completely relevant. We are talking about porting iPad/iPhone apps to Metro which is a PC platform. Using random numbers for a simple example, if there are 50 million PC's sold with Windows 8 when it comes out, and 51 million iPads sold in the same period, the iOS platform has more potential customers.

Should probably also state the obvious that this is a new market we are talking about and PC upgrades rates are slower than tablet upgrade rates. iPad will have more to start with but Windows 8 will eventually catch up over time.

CJEric said,
If you say so. My only point is that it will take a looong time for MS to build a similarly large tablet user base as iOS has (assuming they ever catch up). We'll see how well MS's strategy of leveraging their desktop user base will work for the Metro ecosystem.

I understand that point. However, they are increasing their reach of all metro apps to not only the Tablets but all Desktops sold. On every desktop the user *will* see the metro interface and the marketplace. In doing so, developers are not just building for tablet users.

Personally, I see Intel Tablets being great options for the average person. Docking your tablet and using it as a desktop with all the bells and whistles of windows making it a fully capable Content Creation Device and then picking it up to use as your Content Consumption Device on the couch is just a glorious thing. I've been doing that with my Samsung Slate. I pickup my work machine and take it home with me to browse the web/news on my couch or dock it upstairs to work.

We'll have to see if vendors display that scenario properly to see if it gains traction, if the build it, though, they will sell.

Co-ords said,
Why would I want to do that?????
Why wouldn't you? Even if only half of the current Windows 7 users upgrade to Win8 you're looking at over 300 million potential customers. Duh? Wow...

CJEric said,

Metro style apps only run on Windows 8, which more or less 0% of the people on earth are currently using.

That's just stupid. How many people were running iOS before 2007? NO ONE. So what's your point. Windows is Windows and Windows is king. There is no OS that consistently sells more products than it does. Windows is what made the dot.com boom a reality. if you need to make a quick million bucks, develop an application for Windows. if you only need a $10,000 develop for iOS and Android.

Do the math. The only reason Adobe still makes apps for Apple is because Windows users provide the cash flow need to sustain the product on Mac OS. If Adobe stopped developing for Windows, they would go broke.

CJEric said,

If you say so. My only point is that it will take a looong time for MS to build a similarly large tablet user base as iOS has (assuming they ever catch up). We'll see how well MS's strategy of leveraging their desktop user base will work for the Metro ecosystem.

NO>..it will not take them as long. Windows is already the king and riuns on 90% of desktops. In fact that number is larger thans to the fact Macs run Windows as well. What you dont seem to understand is that businesses are 65% of Mcrosoft's user base. They are the ones who buy 100's and 1000's of copies of Windows, not consumers.

A portable tablet, that runs Windows, that is 100% compatible with the vast majority of the apps they use, including Enterprise applications is going to kill iOS and Android as they can't compete on that level.

Android and iOS usage of Exchange is a joke. Nothing works better with Exchange than Outlook. Unless you use a browser and use Office online, Office is not avail on any other platform except Windows.

Businessmen are dying for a lao level device that weights 2lbs that isn't a laptop or netbook or ultrabook that can run all the same apps as those can. The new UI isn't really that important and business will like turn that off through Group Policies. It will just be a Windows portable tablet that has a USB, HDMI, supports Flash, Silverlight, Java and more out the box and they won't need to buy new apps.\

The Metro apps is mostly going to be for those who use ARM versions of Windows 8 on tablets that wll likely only have access to the Metro UI, not the typical Windows UI. Windows 8 ARM and Windows 8 x86 will not be 100% identical.

I am making an assumption that ARM tablets will have a single UI just like iOS and Android has on mobile devices. There may be SOME ARM devices that will have 2 UI's, but what would be the point? They may as well stick with Windows 8 x86.

X86 Windows will always have an advantage of ARM based devices, as does OS X have over iOS.

Microsoft also stands to make double money because, apps they make for Metro will work on both devices ARM or x86. For users with x86 Windows, they can still install Metro apps that do things quicker vs full applications. ARM will only have access to Metro apps.

CJEric said,

If you say so. My only point is that it will take a looong time for MS to build a similarly large tablet user base as iOS has (assuming they ever catch up). We'll see how well MS's strategy of leveraging their desktop user base will work for the Metro ecosystem.

NO>..it will not take them as long. Windows is already the king and riuns on 90% of desktops. In fact that number is larger thans to the fact Macs run Windows as well. What you dont seem to understand is that businesses are 65% of Mcrosoft's user base. They are the ones who buy 100's and 1000's of copies of Windows, not consumers.

A portable tablet, that runs Windows, that is 100% compatible with the vast majority of the apps they use, including Enterprise applications is going to kill iOS and Android as they can't compete on that level.

Android and iOS usage of Exchange is a joke. Nothing works better with Exchange than Outlook. Unless you use a browser and use Office online, Office is not avail on any other platform except Windows.

Businessmen are dying for a lao level device that weights 2lbs that isn't a laptop or netbook or ultrabook that can run all the same apps as those can. The new UI isn't really that important and business will like turn that off through Group Policies. It will just be a Windows portable tablet that has a USB, HDMI, supports Flash, Silverlight, Java and more out the box and they won't need to buy new apps.\

The Metro apps is mostly going to be for those who use ARM versions of Windows 8 on tablets that wll likely only have access to the Metro UI, not the typical Windows UI. Windows 8 ARM and Windows 8 x86 will not be 100% identical.

I am making an assumption that ARM tablets will have a single UI just like iOS and Android has on mobile devices. There may be SOME ARM devices that will have 2 UI's, but what would be the point? They may as well stick with Windows 8 x86.

X86 Windows will always have an advantage of ARM based devices, as does OS X have over iOS.

Microsoft also stands to make double money because, apps they make for Metro will work on both devices ARM or x86. For users with x86 Windows, they can still install Metro apps that do things quicker vs full applications. ARM will only have access to Metro apps.

TechieXP said,
Windows is Windows and Windows is king. [...] if you need to make a quick million bucks, develop an application for Windows. if you only need a $10,000 develop for iOS and Android.

alright then...

EDIT: Forgot: "That's just stupid."