Microsoft defends its commitment to fighting malware in new blog post

A couple of weeks ago, Holly Stewart, a senior program manager for Microsoft's Malware Protection Center, stated in an interview that the free Microsoft Security Essentials software tool it offers was designed to offer Windows PC users "baseline" protection against viruses and malware. The statement was treated by some PC users as an admission that Security Essentials was not good enough to stop malware threats.

Today, Microsoft decided to defend its malware policies via a new post on the Malware Protection Center blog. While the post did not mention the Microsoft Security Essentials interview, Dennis Batchelder, the partner group program manager for the company's Malware Protection Center, stated that it was "fully committed to protecting our consumer and business customers from malware."

Batchelder stated that in the past year the company has done a number of things to improve its malware-fighting features. He said, "We’ve developed early warning telemetry and faster signature delivery systems to respond to these threats." He also stated that Microsoft gets data from the owners of millions of PCs who have voluntarily provided access to their machines, which he says helps the center "identify and prioritize new malware files." Finally, Batchelder says the center has been sharing what it knows about malware threats with others in the industry.

Batchelder said that those efforts have helped to increase its malware protection results that have "less incorrect detections and less misses" by what he calls a "significant rate" between the last quarter of 2011 and the first half of 2013. He did not offer any specific numbers.

He closed his blog post by saying, "We are proud of the protection capabilities we provide for well over 150 million computers worldwide with our real-time antimalware products. We believe in Microsoft antimalware products and strongly recommend them to our customers, to our friends, and to our families."

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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I use NOD32 myself but when i'm fixing up laptops or PC's i always throw MSE on there.

It's easy, It's Free, and It's actually pretty Resource friendly.

What are these AV thingys i hear so much about? Isn`t it mostly a multi billion dollar scam to extract money out of computer users!

I'll stick with MSE regardless of what any 3rd party says. I stopped having to clean off viruses from relatives and friends PC's when I installed it for them.

Router with basic NAT and Firewall with some site blocking.
+
Windows firewall ON
+
MSE
+
Common sense (Users have "User" level accounts, no access to Admin account, Guest account for guest users)
=
No nasty in many years!

Yeah, it's what I've been using. Of course, I also run MalwareBytes Pro in conjunction with MSE. It's pretty nice when you're browsing third-party streamer sites, you try to get to one and it doesn't come up... and suddenly, MBytes is telling you a malicious site was blocked. Saves my tail quite a bit on occasion.

Of course, I'm using NoScript now too. Great addon.

dead.cell said,
Yeah, it's what I've been using. Of course, I also run MalwareBytes Pro in conjunction with MSE. It's pretty nice when you're browsing third-party streamer sites, you try to get to one and it doesn't come up... and suddenly, MBytes is telling you a malicious site was blocked. Saves my tail quite a bit on occasion.

Of course, I'm using NoScript now too. Great addon.

I normally use FireFox in Private mode with AdBlock Plus with no exceptions. Most of the things are blocked right there.

Been meaning to get MalwareBytes Pro but never needed it. If I get 1 infection then I might think getting it.

I placed a call to MS support for a particularly nasty malware infection that made a computer unbootable at a business. I need to make sure we got the PC back in bootable condition, and I only had a limited amount of time to do it, so I called them.

They fixed it by sending me to Hitmanpro, and then Eset.com and then doing a SFC /scannow. Imagine my surprise.

Then the other day I attached someone's hard disk to my own Windows 8.1 machine to get some files because that machine had been bluescreening, and Windows Defender found a rootkit and got rid of it as soon as I attached. Pretty cool. Yes, I like to play with fire.

I think its good, and honestly its needed. How.many people do we know who never update or renew their antivirus? Its much better than nothing! And, really, if you want/need more? Fine. Go get it. But every computer with MSE is safer than having nothing, and that's better for all of us

I've been using MSE on all my PCs for a few years, replacing avast!, and it's pretty good if you use it with common sense. I have one machine that recently had MSE killed by a virus (that I gave admin permissions - my fourth ever lapse, and as it was a crack anyway I stopped MSE interfering) and I installed avast home for the first time in years... Still excellent software, dealt with the virus, but it makes you appreciate how silent MSE is, avast is popping up constantly to say its updated or I need to reboot or look at me look at me! I dont give a crap, unless you've found something shut up!

This is pretty much exactly what I was going to say, but now I don't have to. I've used MSE since beta and never once had a problem. I think the key is, as you said, simply using common sense when browsing the Internet.

AWilliams87 said,
You need o reduce the weight of the mobile site, Neowin, to make the text more readable.

It is fine on mine.... you might want to adjust your settings on your phone/tablet.

This part came off a bit too strong:

"strongly recommend them to our customers, to our friends, and to our families."