Microsoft demos how IE11 helps to speed up web browsing

The launch of Internet Explorer 11 as part of Windows 8.1 and more recently for Windows 7, brings new ways to speed up the overall web browser experience. One of them involves predicting which web site will be clicked on next by the user and pre-rendering that page ahead of time.

In a new blog post, Microsoft goes over how this is accomplished with IE11. It states:

The predictions are done using our understanding of browsing patterns, user browsing habits, and common cues in Web pages, like “next” links and pagination. Bing’s extensive knowledge of the Web and data mining help make these predictions laser sharp.

If you have IE11 installed, you can check out a demo of how this page prediction method works with a new IE Test Drive website. It features images of European landmarks on each of its pages that have large file sizes that can take several seconds to load in other web browser. However, those same pages are rendered nearly instantly in IE11.

Web site designers can also use a "prerender" tag in links on their pages so that when a IE11 user surfs to the site, the browser can begin to pre-render the page in the background so that it can load quicker when a person clicks on that link. Microsoft says this is accomplished without compromising battery life on a tablet or notebook PC.

The blog also talks about IE11's support for the experimental SPDY/3 protocol, which is also designed to help with page loading times. The blog states, "SPDY/3 implements multiplexing of request / responses on a single connection. SPDY/3 improves page load time by removing the limitation on number of outstanding requests and by using a 'warm' connection for each parallel download."

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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26 Comments

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Not doing anything here, but could be the broadband speed.

Am I the only person who is somewhat concerned at this? What happens when the algorithm gets it wrong and pre-renders a delete or automatic modify record link in a CMS or database application.

Actually, I know exactly what happens, the sys ad that put IE 11 out in the first place gets fired and Microsoft points to the supplemental IE11 EULA that states their damaged are limited to $1 USD.

Studio384 said,
Then what about all those people searching with Google in Chrome?
What about them? What's your point?

Any algorithm is only ever as good as the worst case imagination of the person who wrote it. IE, Chrome, Firefox, it doesn't matter. I find it concerning for environments running web based LOB apps that are at best held together with shoelaces.

exotoxic said,
What happens if the pre rendered page has something malicious in it??
its filtered out just like when its not pre-rendered.

I'd use IE more if it had the extensions like FF and the ability for more customizing of the tab settings. A little increase in loading websites is no big deal for me.

Spicoli said,
Our company has a policy against spyware.

Any use of unapproved or illegal installed software found on employee's machine is subject to termination.

HR Handbook Policy Code - 1.701 - D

zhangm said,

One may not boldly go where no sysadmin has gone before?

D was been terminated in Generations,so it is no longer boldly going anywhere.

I'd use if it the browser was smart about it and didn't send my browsing history to MSFT. I don't need it "predicting" that much.

neonspark said,
I'd use if it the browser was smart about it and didn't send my browsing history to MSFT. I don't need it "predicting" that much.

It does? Thank god Chrome doesn't do that... Chrome <3 /s

neonspark said,
I'd use if it the browser was smart about it and didn't send my browsing history to MSFT. I don't need it "predicting" that much.
where do you see that?

neonspark said,
I'd use if it the browser was smart about it and didn't send my browsing history to MSFT. I don't need it "predicting" that much.
You can disable that, anyway, IE uses the "prev" and "next" in HTML do determine what page should come next, so much information...

Cyborg_X said,
It's in the privacy section in metro IE. If you use flip ahead it sends the info back and forth to MS, which is lame.
Right, but thats not sending your browser history. Its doing the same thing Chrome does and fetches the links and tries to predict the correct one you want to go to if you "flip" forward.

MikeInBA said,
Right, but thats not sending your browser history. Its doing the same thing Chrome does and fetches the links and tries to predict the correct one you want to go to if you "flip" forward.

"When you turn on the flip ahead with page prediction feature, your web browsing history is periodically sent to Microsoft and used in the aggregate."