Microsoft hiring for future "cloud gaming" initiative

As Microsoft prepares to reveal the first official details of its Xbox game console in a little over three weeks from now, the company is also hiring to help create services that could be used in future gaming experiences.

In a new post on the Microsoft Careers website, the company says that it is looking for a "Program Manager/Producer" with experience that will help Microsoft create "future initiatives in cloud gaming". The description hints that this will be different than just putting up game saves on a cloud server, as the Xbox 360 can do already. The post states:

You will work across internal teams, and with external development partners to drive experiences in gaming that have not been possible before and have not been done before. This is a special opportunity, it’s new, challenging and requires a mindset that is biased for action and an attitude of dogged determination.

The Xbox 360 supports saving game files to the cloud but not full games yet

The hiring post adds that whomever is picked by Microsoft for the position will work with an Executive Producer on a job that's "related to creation of new AAA player experiences driven by the cloud." This sounds a bit like a game or games that will be played mostly on a cloud service, something similar to what Sony is developing for the PlayStation 4 console. That console, which is scheduled to launch in late 2013, will incorporate the streaming game technology that it acquired when it bought the Gaikai service in 2012.

It certainly sounds interesting and all of this could be a part of the next Xbox when it launches, hopefully by late 2013 or early 2014.

Source: Microsoft Careers | Image via Microsoft

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13 Comments

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My new favorite Xbox error report (on campus connection is fail):

"Your connection speed is not sufficient to experience cloud services other than saving files, please check with your ISP on ways to fix this issue"

Agreed, from what I have played with OnLive and Gaikai, it sure could use a LOT better computing serverside before this would have any chance of mass adoption. It will probably never really work for fast multiplayer games anyway as there is just too much lag and the systems work with the last input until a new one has been received.

Jason Stillion said,
Sony's using game streaming for Backwards Compatibility in the PS4, and this is the direction the industry is going.

Really? I hadn't heard that before. As in you can download your game or is it run in the cloud?

Ever since OnLive I have hated "cloud gaming". Well mainly because OnLive's servers suck and you are just playing with lag and crappy GFX.

But, It would be nice to see MS expand the technology.

Edited by ShareShiz, Apr 29 2013, 5:54pm :

This is the technology that can't exist without the right internet connection. Fast, reliable, widely available internet is mandatory before the market for cloud apps, games, and OSes can ever hope to grow large enough to be profitable.

Some might argue that the driving factor behind Google Fiber is to get the Internet moving in that direction so that they can start packaging Chrome OS as a high-speed cloud OS serving up high-end software experiences over data lines alone.

Oddly, nobody's made that connection.

I was talking about a companies servers being uber slow and causing a bad gaming experience.

Even though my internet is pretty fast (50mbps), I wish I had Fiber (not from Google).

Joshie said,
This is the technology that can't exist without the right internet connection. Fast, reliable, widely available internet is mandatory before the market for cloud apps, games, and OSes can ever hope to grow large enough to be profitable.

Some might argue that the driving factor behind Google Fiber is to get the Internet moving in that direction so that they can start packaging Chrome OS as a high-speed cloud OS serving up high-end software experiences over data lines alone.

Oddly, nobody's made that connection.

Do not forget uncapped and cheaper connections.... Comparing what I pay here in the US and in Italy drives me crazy all the time: in the US I pay almost double for a much slower connection.

Fritzly said,

Do not forget uncapped and cheaper connections.... Comparing what I pay here in the US and in Italy drives me crazy all the time: in the US I pay almost double for a much slower connection.


I forgot: both landline and smatphone data.

Considering what MS was able to shove down the pipeline of a RDP connection back in 2006-2007. Where playing 3d games and watching HD movies over a <4mbit connection without much lag/latency. I can imagine they can do a better job with todays tech.

Also for your sucky pricy internet connections, blame your gov. We, EU citizens, have fairly cheap internet partially because of our EU government with anti-monopoly and max prices (they also limit prices for international (within EU) phonecalls, demand companies you cant live without to charge reasonable prices etc.)

Shadowzz said,
Considering what MS was able to shove down the pipeline of a RDP connection back in 2006-2007. Where playing 3d games and watching HD movies over a <4mbit connection without much lag/latency. I can imagine they can do a better job with todays tech.

Also for your sucky pricy internet connections, blame your gov. We, EU citizens, have fairly cheap internet partially because of our EU government with anti-monopoly and max prices (they also limit prices for international (within EU) phonecalls, demand companies you cant live without to charge reasonable prices etc.)

I think we need to approach that with a much more careful awareness of the language we use.

To say you "can't live without" internet access fast enough for lag-free cloud applications betrays a very odd sense of priorities. Even to say you can't live without internet, period, is dangerous language, because it opens all kinds of other markets up to the argument of minimum requirements for public welfare.

The language cannot be "can't live without", because frankly, it isn't true. Word it closer to reality, and don't simply use "the internet". Make it about what the internet makes uniquely accessible.