Microsoft hits back against government surveillance, highlights commitment to privacy

Microsoft has not been shy about combating the accusations made against the company that they are working with government agencies and allowing them to access their data at will. After the Snowden leaks, Microsoft took a hit to its reputation after it was stated that they were helping the NSA crack encryption keys. Microsoft was not alone in being called out by the leaks but for a company building out a billion dollar cloud business, the brand needs to be protected.

In the past, Microsoft has publicly called out the current practices that are used to collect data and they are actively taking a stance to protect client data. This point came up again today as Kevin Turner, near the end of his presentation, hit home the point that Microsoft does not engineer backdoors into its products to allow third parties - including governments and security agencies - to indiscriminately access its users' data, nor has it ever done so.

Further, he stated that the company has not provided the government encryption keys to its data and that they have never provided business or government data in response to a national security order. 

The intentions of these statements were clear at WPC: to reassure its partners that its cloud is secure and no government agency has access to its services. Why is this important? WPC is the company's largest partner event of the year and Microsoft needs these third parties to keep pushing their services, and by asserting their control over privacy, it alleviates a key concern for these partners.

The clearly articulated points received generous applause at the conference as everyone understood this to mean that the company is not and will not bend over to government requests and will fight for data privacy with every request.

For those of you who host your data in the cloud or use a service that runs on Azure, Microsoft says that it is deeply committed to protecting your data and is working to further enhance its that commitment going forward.

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13 Comments

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if theres no Court ruling to back Microsoft "privacy claim", others/potential customers should see this as another PR stunt from Microsoft to expand the NSA coverages toward gullible masses.

Microsoft is an oxymoron the same with AOL and Yahoo and Google, why the heck did they even do an arrangement with the US Govt to begin with?

shadodemon said,
Microsoft is an oxymoron the same with AOL and Yahoo and Google, why the heck did they even do an arrangement with the US Govt to begin with?

Because all of those corporations just love gathering all kinds of information out of you and are more than willing to hand it over to the feds so they don't get charged with treason.

It's going to take a lot more than a single good PR campaign to convince us that our data is safe from our BIG GIANT spying govt in your hands.

None of this means nothing if they have to hand over the data. And cannot even tell anyone about it. Now they are trying to make american companies hand data over data that's not even in the country. Until this attitude has changed then nothing they post will make a difference.

They vocally object while complying with the laws we find questionably legal, as do the others companies.

What's happening is there (and others) losing business as the revelations of the NSA outside of the US. Especially when there's legal gagged warrant's being issued on them that they can't talk about.

In a nutshell this is a press release about how they don't give total access for the NSA to do what they want, when they want.

Jason Stillion said,
They vocally object while complying with the laws we find questionably legal, as do the others companies.

I assume you're now looking for sources to back up this out of the thin air claim, since there's numerous evidence to the opposite and that MS has been goiŋg way beyond what they're required to to protect their clients data and security.

Jason Stillion said,
They vocally object while complying with the laws we find questionably legal, as do the others companies.

That, or they could shut you down. Make your choice.

they still have to follow the law. i believe that they're really fighting back because its in their financial interest to do so, but the US gov has really damaged their tech sector and it'll take a long time to recover even after they manage to abolish the mass spying.

No data is 100 percent safe and frankly, I wouldnt put anything confidential online that I didnt want anyone to see. Regardless what service it is.