Microsoft launches new Bubbles IE 10 demo site

Earlier this week, the official Internet Explorer developer blog talked about the improvements Microsoft has made for running JavaScript-based websites in IE 10 for Windows 8. Now the blog has posted up a new entry which talks about a recently launched IE 10 demo site called Bubbles. The new demo site is based somewhat on the Bubblemarks animation benchmark.

The Bubbles web site shows IE logo "bubbles" that move in front of the screen, slowly exposing a winter landscape. The demo can be altered in a number of ways, including the amount of bubbles on screen, the collision effects, how gravity affects the bubbles and more. At the bottom of the screen you can see the frame rate of the demo along with info about its computation and rendering time.

The Bubbles site works with other web browsers as well but instead of the IE logo, the "bubbles" turn into the logo of that browser such as the Firefox and Chrome symbols.

The IE blog site goes into a great amount of detail on how the Bubbles demo site was made. It states:

At the core is a relatively simple JavaScript physics engine. On every animation frame, about 60 times per second, the physics engine recalculates the positions of all bubbles, adjusts the speed of each bubble by applying gravity, and computes collisions. All these computations involve intensive floating point math. Each bubble is represented on screen by a DOM image element to which a CSS transform is applied. The image is first translated around its origin, and then scaled dynamically to produce the effect of the bubble inflating. In JavaScript, every bubble is represented as an object with accessor properties, as introduced in ECMAScript 5.

Source: IE blog site | Image via Microsoft

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The anomaly of the test is 64bit IE on Windows 7, it ranks as low as Chrome.

On our 'average' baseline system
(Close to mid point of systems users are running based on percentage of users.)

Windows 7 Tests
IE9 32bit - 40/45 fps
Firefox - 10/13 fps
Chrome - 18/22 fps
IE9 64bit - 19//23 fps

Windows 8
IE10 - 60fps

...and on WP
WP7 IE9 - 15/18 fps

mocax said,
works well in IE9, same speed as chrome

The only system we could get Chrome to match even IE9s FPS was an overpowered CPU with an underpowered GPU.

On a netbook for example, Chrome was 1-2fps, and IE9 was 20fps and IE10 was 25fps
(Low CPU, Low GPU)

OnhHighend CPU system, Chrome could maintain usable fps, however IE9 on a low end CPU system with a low/mid range GPU could still hold 60fps far easier. (Which is the most common configuration users are running with.)

The variance between low end systems to high end systems for IE (9 &10) was from 20fps to 60fps and even 15fps on a WP7 with IE9. So this is usable even on the low end system with a fairly consistent experience for users.

Here is why this is important to note, if this was a live HTML RIA site, the developer would not have to worry about performance for IE users. However for Firefox and Chrome locked to the old browser model and highly CPU bound, the site is unusable for low end users and not even fluid unless they have fairly high end CPU.

This 'variance, is destroying HTML5 adoption and roll out, and why developers are considering the security nightmare that is WebGL to bypass the browser and bypass standards to get acceptable performance.

It is really time Mozilla and WebKit were rebuilt from the ground up as IE9 was, as a 'compile/run' engine instead of a 'content/document render' engine. Until this happens this variance will continue to be a problem, and you will still see crazy things like WP7 running a demo like this faster than Chrome and Firefox on the average desktop system.

I find it funny that Microsoft is going "Look! Our browser has a higher FPS! That mean's we're the best!"

When actually, 99.99% of people don't care what FPS their browser gets (it's Internet Explorer, not Call of Duty!), as long as it can display Facebook.

Wake me when Internet Explorer stops being the object of ridicule for the web developer community (I know, it's on it's way, but that doesn't mean IE6 and 7 don't still haunt many a dark corner of the internet...)

cyberdrone2000 said,
I find it funny that Microsoft is going "Look! Our browser has a higher FPS! That mean's we're the best!"

When actually, 99.99% of people don't care what FPS their browser gets (it's Internet Explorer, not Call of Duty!), as long as it can display Facebook.

Wake me when Internet Explorer stops being the object of ridicule for the web developer community (I know, it's on it's way, but that doesn't mean IE6 and 7 don't still haunt many a dark corner of the internet...)

Uhm, one of the reasons IE is the 'object of ridicule for the web developer community' is because of speed issues in previous versions (usually compared to new versions of other browsers mainly because people use old versions of IE but not old versions of other browsers) so they are working on the speed issue. They've also done a lot about security, memory usage, minimizing the UI and so on. If you feel that knocking IE for the rest of your life regardless of almost all outstanding issues being fixed in it is worthwhile, feel free, but it's really silly imo.

cyberdrone2000 said,
I find it funny that Microsoft is going "Look! Our browser has a higher FPS! That mean's we're the best!"

When actually, 99.99% of people don't care what FPS their browser gets (it's Internet Explorer, not Call of Duty!), as long as it can display Facebook.

Wake me when Internet Explorer stops being the object of ridicule for the web developer community (I know, it's on it's way, but that doesn't mean IE6 and 7 don't still haunt many a dark corner of the internet...)

Actually performance and fps was a big deal while MS was pushing HTML5 as the web's savior. Now that Flash will be bundled with Windows 8 and MS has toned down the HTML5 rhetoric basically admitting it isn't ready for widespread adoption, it does kind of put a damper on things.

Using Opera 12, and get 15 fps with 100 'O's floating around..(HWA and WebGL enabled)
Don't have IE10 to compare it with though lol
(Windows 7 64bit OS and Browser)

ncc50446 said,
Using Opera 12, and get 15 fps with 100 'O's floating around..(HWA and WebGL enabled)
Don't have IE10 to compare it with though lol
(Windows 7 64bit OS and Browser)

I used Opera 12 x64 snapshot and changed between webGL and DX10 HWA modes the difference was 15fps for GL and 27fps for DX10 mode on CF's HD5770 @ 890/1250 using the latest 12.6 BETA Catalysts
oh and Maxthon 3.0 gets 29fps in standard mode 15 in IE mode
Opera Next gets from 2 to 37 fps HWA enabled GL and 35fps in DX10 mode

Edited by Athlonite, Jun 16 2012, 1:56pm :

IE10 Needs to be good. I've never been warm to any browser other than IE, but Operat 12 beta with Acceleration enabled is pretty darn impressive. I'm preferring it to IE9 actually.

On Windows 7 Ultimate x64:

Firefox 13 = 13 fps
Chrome Canary = 33 fps
IE 9 = 53 fps


On Windows 8 Release Preview x64:

Firefox 13 = 9 fps
Chrome Canary = 17 fps
IE 10 = 51 fps

kellykufeldt said,
On Windows 7 Ultimate x64:

Firefox 13 = 13 fps
Chrome Canary = 33 fps
IE 9 = 53 fps


On Windows 8 Release Preview x64:

Firefox 13 = 9 fps
Chrome Canary = 17 fps
IE 10 = 51 fps

For me on Windows 8 Preview x 64
Firefox Nightly 15a1 x64 I was getting 34 fps
On IE 10 = 28 fps

I assume IE 10 is x64 only right? As there is only one version on windows 8?

I ran this test on a HP Laptop with a AMD Turion X2 that is about 4 years old

Nimdock said,
On my IE10 (Win8 release preview) it runs at 5 FPS.

Is there something I am overlooking?

Don't run it on a 386.

no-sweat said,
Cool. Too bad it doesn't work in IE for me.

Are you using IE8 (or older version)?

I played with the demo for a while, it works in IE9 and Opera 12 (I'm using Windows 7).

no-sweat said,
Cool. Too bad it doesn't work in IE for me.

It works in IE9 on Win Vista/7, just slowly - it's designed to show off IE10, it even states that basically in the blog post so I would expect somewhat better performance with Windows 8 and IE10. There's still a chance that Microsoft could release IE10 for Windows 7 but, it really won't matter I suppose as IE has been losing to Chrome in terms of popularity.

Not an issue for me since Firefox is my primary browser, has been for years, and that's not going to change, pretty much ever.

br0adband said,

It works in IE9 on Win Vista/7, just slowly - it's designed to show off IE10, it even states that basically in the blog post so I would expect somewhat better performance with Windows 8 and IE10. There's still a chance that Microsoft could release IE10 for Windows 7 but, it really won't matter I suppose as IE has been losing to Chrome in terms of popularity.

Not an issue for me since Firefox is my primary browser, has been for years, and that's not going to change, pretty much ever.

IE10 is coming to Windows 7 at RTM.