Microsoft launches Office 365 Personal, $69.99 for a year

Microsoft announced plans to offer Office 365 Personal in March, and today the subscription plan for its productivity software is now officially on sale, providing the cheapest yet for the Office 365 family of services.

The Office blog says that customers can now go to Office365.com to sign up for the Personal tier for $69.99 a year or $6.99 a month. It will also be available for sale on other sites and in retail stores. That price will give customers the rights to download and install Office software on one PC and one tablet. That tablet can be the iPad, which recently launched versions of Word, Excel and PowerPoint to great success so far.

Microsoft's previous consumer version of Office 365, Home Premium, will now simply be called Office 365 Home. Its price will remain the same at $99.99 a year or $9.99 a month. That give users the right to use Office software on up to five PCs and up to five tablets. Both the Home and Personal plans give users 20GB of additional storage space on Microsoft's OneDrive cloud storage service, along with 60 minutes of paid Skype calls per month.

Source: Office blog | Image via Microsoft

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38 Comments

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It's almost funny but I am paying Rs. 4199 ( $69.7) for my Office 365 Home yearly subscription in India. I guess this new package in India would be much lower too.

This is a great deal IMO, considering everything that you get + the rapid release updates instead of having to buy a full suite each time at a much more expensive price. This is great! :-) I may switch my Home version to Personal, since my Windows phone already has it.

You also have to remember they are not doing 3-year release cycles anymore... it's much faster at 1-year major release cycles with many updates throughout the year. So this makes a lot of sense so you're not left with an outdated version and you're being more cost-effective.

Unlike Adobe who overprices everything with their one plan, at least the Office team is being a lot more reasonable and affordable with their various plans available. And also, there's also the free apps and Office Online. So there's something for everyone. Love it :D

Edited by j2006, Apr 15 2014, 5:59pm :

I was able to get Office 365 University as a student for £70.

This gave me a 4 year Office 365 subscription with 2 Office licenses for PC/Mac as well as support for the mobile versions.

So if you only need office for the iPad and a desktop, Microsoft just cut the price by 30% for everyone but apple users. Suckit, appstore

greenwizard88 said,
So if you only need office for the iPad and a desktop, Microsoft just cut the price by 30% for everyone but apple users. Suckit, appstore

How so? for the desktop licence you can either install office on a PC or Mac.

Not true. They can easily update the subscription pricing in the apps via an app update or however it's done on iPad.

anothercookie said,
They mean that the $6.99 price cannot be bought through the ipad app. you have to go to the office 365 website to get this cheaper price.
But how does this matter? If you don't buy the subscription via the app all that happens is that Apple doesn't get its customary 30% cut.

Too expensive. Five non-profit users / year is $99.
Although I understand there are fixed costs, the 1 user at $69 / year is far from interesting.

I would have expected something close to $30 / year without the freebies.

Umm... when you consider the rapid release cycle, and you consider the cost of a full suite updated to the next version at every iteration... $69.99 is quite a deal in my opinion.

For those that can't afford that, Office Online and the mobile apps are free and totally awesome.

These Office subscriptions are far too expensive...

I'm not sure who they are targeting with these offers... I mean via work I can get full Office 2013 desktop via the Home Use Program for $10. This is a perpetual license...

That only applies if your company has a deal with MS for that kind of thing. Mine does, but it was only recently that we got it

Most people can't get Office 2013 via the Home Use program. This is a pretty good deal for people who need Office for whatever reason and cant afford the massive upfront cost.

Its basically £41 a year to always have the latest version of Office.

InsaneNutter said,
Most people can't get Office 2013 via the Home Use program. This is a pretty good deal for people who need Office for whatever reason and cant afford the massive upfront cost.

Its basically £41 a year to always have the latest version of Office.

Do users really need the latest version of Office? I mean, honestly, what has been added to Office that is a must have for an average user?

I mean you could easily still be using Office 2007 or 2010 without issue for the foreseeable future.

They did add saving to strict OOXML, and more tightly integrated OneDrive, which are nice features to have. However, I would agree that they are not "Must Have" features (as evidenced by my continued use of Office 2010)

LogicalApex said,
These Office subscriptions are far too expensive...

I'm not sure who they are targeting with these offers... I mean via work I can get full Office 2013 desktop via the Home Use Program for $10. This is a perpetual license...

The Home Use Program is available when a company has Software Assurance on a full MS Office license. I have been wondering when they will eventually offer Office365 at a hefty discount instead of the single license.

If you plan to "keep it legal", The HUP copy of Office is licensed for install on only two machines that are not used simultaneously. A desktop and a laptop let's say. You don't get any of the online features or the 20GB of storage. You don't even get the iPad version with it and less frequent updates.

I do think $69 a year is steep compared to the $99 version's value.

tboggs13 said,

The Home Use Program is available when a company has Software Assurance on a full MS Office license. I have been wondering when they will eventually offer Office365 at a hefty discount instead of the single license.

If you plan to "keep it legal", The HUP copy of Office is licensed for install on only two machines that are not used simultaneously. A desktop and a laptop let's say. You don't get any of the online features or the 20GB of storage. You don't even get the iPad version with it and less frequent updates.

I do think $69 a year is steep compared to the $99 version's value.

Is the 20GB of storage really a reason to pay $70 a year? You can get similar levels of storage for free from Box, DropBox, Google Drive, and etc...

The iPad version is similarly a bit much... I mean editing Office documents on mobile is a rare task for me as the experience is still very limited. Paying monthly for that when all of their competition is perpetual is a bit much.

I think this shouldn't cost more than $10-$12/year for what is being offered here. Even that is pushing it.

LogicalApex said,

Do users really need the latest version of Office? I mean, honestly, what has been added to Office that is a must have for an average user?

I mean you could easily still be using Office 2007 or 2010 without issue for the foreseeable future.

In 2010 the rest of the apps in the office suite got the ribbon (i personalyl find that a lot quicker to get tasks done) in 2013 Outlook got Exchange ActiveSync support, allowing users with Hotmail / Outlook.com accounts to sync email, contacts and calendar to the Outlook desktop app.

To get the equivalent applications as a one off purchase though its £330 for Office Pro 2013 or £185 for Office Home & Business 2013.

I guess it really depends on your needs and individuals usage as to which is better, however for what you get i dont think 365 is a bad deal, as much as i prefer to own things outright.

LogicalApex said,

I think this shouldn't cost more than $10-$12/year for what is being offered here. Even that is pushing it.

If all you do is use Word like Notepad, sure, it's pretty steep, but this price does not reflect its value at all. Get a grip and stop being a tight posterior.

People spend more than this on coffee, and yet, this tool allows you to be more productive and generate personal wealth, for what is quite a reasonable rate compared to what it used to cost to deck out multiple computers with the equivalent suites (Hint: This has more programs than Home and Student, which used to be the cheapest suite).

Honestly, some people today.

I don't see what they're aiming for with this. $9.99 may sound good, but for the average user (which is what they're aiming for) who just wants to type for uni/college, then Google Docs is good enough for the average user at the price tag of free!

djdanster said,
I don't see what they're aiming for with this. $9.99 may sound good, but for the average user (which is what they're aiming for) who just wants to type for uni/college, then Google Docs is good enough for the average user at the price tag of free!

The average user going to college can usually get the full Office client for basically pocket change due to agreements between colleges and Microsoft.

There are other people out there that use office products though you know.

spenser.d said,

The average user going to college can usually get the full Office client for basically pocket change due to agreements between colleges and Microsoft.

There are other people out there that use office products though you know.

You'd be surprised how little money some students have after rent/bills. Not many can afford ANOTHER monthly bill or could afford the $69.99 chunk.

Sraf said,
This is $6.99, not $9.99.

Also, it's not as if there isn't a free, decent version of Office on the web...

Apologies on the price. I got confused with the final paragraph.

True, but some like to stay legal.

No, you misunderstand. There is a free version of Microsoft Office for the web called Office Online. All you need is a Microsoft Account

djdanster said,

You'd be surprised how little money some students have after rent/bills. Not many can afford ANOTHER monthly bill or could afford the $69.99 chunk.

I'm not talking about a monthly fee. Students can usually get full client versions of office for a very small one time fee. I think I paid $10 or something like that for Office 2007 when I was in college. Direct from Microsoft through deals made with universities.

depending what you want to do. google doc is good for multiple people working on single document but it doesn't have Office features for college students for doing projects.

Sraf said,
No, you misunderstand. There is a free version of Microsoft Office for the web called Office Online. All you need is a Microsoft Account

Microsoft needs to do a better job of advertising that Word can be 'Free', every single person I know thinks Gdocs is the only way to get a free Word like editor, this includes professional software developers which is sad.

Just adding though, for the "average user who just wants to type for uni/college" Microsoft actually has Office 365 University. Afaik, even if your school has no special arrangement with Microsoft, you can get it as long as you are a university/college student, faculty or staff. If your school has a special arrangement then you get other offers too.

http://blogs.office.com/2012/1...-higher-education-students/ Price is $79 for 4 years, 2 computers. Uni/college students therefore aren't the target for Office 365 Personal.

tntomek said,

Microsoft needs to do a better job of advertising that Word can be 'Free', every single person I know thinks Gdocs is the only way to get a free Word like editor, this includes professional software developers which is sad.

Well, they have, Office Online is the name now and if you go to office.com you see it right up front, Word Online. They make a point that it's free and so on.

I guess he meant Office Online which is a free counterpart of Google Docs while being "purer" office experience.

P.S. Oops, I did not mention others have pointed out that already.