Microsoft makes sharing links in IE 10 with Windows 8 a much easier process

We have all done it; when we see a link to a web page that we want to share with others, we copy that website URL, then go to another web site or a program like an email client, Facebook or Twitter, and then past that URL we want to share. Now Microsoft says that experience has been made much more simpler with both Internet Explorer 10 and Windows 8.

In the newest post on the official IE blog, Microsoft talks about using the new Share charm in Windows 8 to share content with others. The blog post states, "When you use the Share charm to share a site from the browser, IE10 creates two data formats that contain relevant content – the URI, and some HTML that includes a rich representation of the page." An example of that kind of content sharing is shown above, which is how a preview of a YouTube link might look in IE 10.

Microsoft adds:

Both of these data formats are created for an “implicit” share, which is the name for what happens when you share the site that you are currently viewing. Since Web pages can be represented as hyperlinks or a rich HTML link preview, IE10 includes both types of data. Of course, if you aren’t sharing the whole page, but rather, some content that you’ve highlighted, IE10 will share the HTML of your selection instead of the URI and the link preview. In this case, sharing a selection would be called an “explicit” share, and does not include the link.

But what if you see a link to a web page that you want to view later? Microsoft has come up with a sample app called Stash that allows for saving links in IE 10 on Windows 8; you can download and use the Stash app right now. You will need to install both the Windows 8 Consumer preview along with the Visual Studio 11 beta to run the Stash app.

Web site developers can program their sites to work with Windows 8 and IE 10 in order to show what kind of information is shared with a website link. Microsoft says that kind of information can be determined with some "extra meta-data markup."

If you are developing a Windows 8 Metro app, you might want to consider adding support for HTML as a shared data format if that Windows 8 app supports the Share target app contract. Microsoft says:

Apps that use HTML can benefit from the link previews shared by IE10 because IE10 does all of the heavy lifting. It parses the site and puts together a short and informative link preview, and all your app needs to do is display and host the HTML. The hyperlink is embedded within the preview, so it functions just like a Uri, but looks much better. This way, apps that don’t have the resources to parse the Web to condense pages into small, rich previews, can still display contextual links as HTML.

Images via Microsoft

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24 Comments

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So basically they changed how bookmarking works to accommodate for metro touch and called it 'stash'.

It works just like Safari's reading list.

Where's my start button !

It's getting better but still not enough to make me want to switch back.

Synced favorites, adblock and I might reconsider.

Aergan said,
It's getting better but still not enough to make me want to switch back.

Synced favorites, adblock and I might reconsider.

If you mean syncing favorites across machines, I believe Windows 8 does that if you use a Microsoft Account as your Windows 8 account.

Aergan said,
It's getting better but still not enough to make me want to switch back.

Synced favorites, adblock and I might reconsider.

Tracking Protection Lists work pretty well as an adblocker. In fact, one comes from the people behind adBlock Plus. They're available already in IE9.

Aergan said,
It's getting better but still not enough to make me want to switch back.

Synced favorites, adblock and I might reconsider.

Synched favourites is already there (in the Metro environment only, and as long as you use a Microsoft account) Desktop IE doesn't sync.

Ad blocking won't ever be coming in Metro IE, that would be almost impossible to implement effectively within the constraints of Metro programming environments.
MS will have to open it up a fair amount before that'll be viable.


On the desktop side you can use the tracking protection list as a limited for of ad block. It's not ideal but it does generally work.

They should be putting their time into supporting CSS3 better, rather than more of this stuff that no one will use like the web slices etc from IE8 that is hardly used.

"But what if you see a link to a web page that you want to view later?"

Its called bookmarking, why do we need another app to do that??

exotoxic said,
"But what if you see a link to a web page that you want to view later?"

Its called bookmarking, why do we need another app to do that??

Stash is for saving the updated HTML previewed link, if all you want is just the basic url without any preview info then sure, bookmark it. It'd also help if you, I dunno, read the original blog post maybe?

This type of sharing is a simple windows runtime api call available to all metro app developers.
This is not surprising that the IE team embraced the share contract.

Next thing is they'll post that they've also used the search contract as well.

DevilsNotDead said,
Make it like Androids sharing!! Sharing in Android is so much easier!!!

This looks just as easy Android version.

I'm liking the direction IE 10 is taking...aside from the plugin-less metro experience. But "HTML 5 is the future" I guess.

Jimmy422 said,
I'm liking the direction IE 10 is taking...aside from the plugin-less metro experience. But "HTML 5 is the future" I guess.

I imagine that it won't be long before most sites switch to HTML 5 content, from Flash, once Windows 8 is released. I doubt they'll be able to ignore it.

Calum said,

I imagine that it won't be long before most sites switch to HTML 5 content, from Flash, once Windows 8 is released. I doubt they'll be able to ignore it.
Makes you wonder what the future of Adobe (especially Flash) holds. IMHO it would be cool if Adobe reworked Flash tools to output to both Flash and HTML5.

Calum said,

I imagine that it won't be long before most sites switch to HTML 5 content, from Flash, once Windows 8 is released. I doubt they'll be able to ignore it.

I dunno, people seem to like looking at the annonying flashing, beeping adverts that cover the screen before you can see, or sometimes use the website.

There will be some happy sole who'll hack flash into working with the metro IE10 and everyone will be greatful...

Personally, I hate flash. It's not as bad now, but the amount of issues I've had to deal with from customers over it is silly. The only site I have flash enabled for these days is youtube, but thats only because not all videos are html5 enabled yet, even new stuff strangly. I've just put it down to google using their monopoly in the online video streaming market to push that webgl they keep trying to get me install for IE. lol

sagum said,

I dunno, people seem to like looking at the annonying flashing, beeping adverts that cover the screen before you can see, or sometimes use the website.

There will be some happy sole who'll hack flash into working with the metro IE10 and everyone will be greatful...

Personally, I hate flash. It's not as bad now, but the amount of issues I've had to deal with from customers over it is silly. The only site I have flash enabled for these days is youtube, but thats only because not all videos are html5 enabled yet, even new stuff strangly. I've just put it down to google using their monopoly in the online video streaming market to push that webgl they keep trying to get me install for IE. lol

HTML 5 won't be dominating any time soon, at least in the video area.

There are many factors such as:
- Lack of a common video codec.
- Hardware acceleration is better on Flash than on HTML 5 hardware accelerated browser (At least in Windows based PCs).

Jose_49 said,

- Lack of a common video codec.
- Hardware acceleration is better on Flash than on HTML 5 hardware accelerated browser (At least in Windows based PCs).

For the popular consumer OSes that license, there is already a common codec.

Hardware acceleration of HTML5+JS on ie10 (Windows 8) smokes flash.

A year ago I would have agreed with you though.

Jose_49 said,

HTML 5 won't be dominating any time soon, at least in the video area.

There are many factors such as:
- Lack of a common video codec.
- Hardware acceleration is better on Flash than on HTML 5 hardware accelerated browser (At least in Windows based PCs).


there isnt a hardware accelerated browser that even comes close to a windows browser with hardware acceleration.

Jimmy422 said,
I'm liking the direction IE 10 is taking...aside from the plugin-less metro experience. But "HTML 5 is the future" I guess.

But contrary to popular beliefs, it ain't gonna be a Flash killer since it is not!