Microsoft offers ad-free Bing to all U.S. K-12 schools in latest effort against Google

Nearly a year ago, Microsoft announced Bing for Schools, an effort to give K-12 schools in the U.S. a way to access their search engine without any ads. Today, after allowing a number of school systems to try their service out, Microsoft has announced the ad-free Bing is now available for all K-12 school systems in the United States.

Microsoft has also changed the name of the program to Bing in the Classroom so that the branding fits better with other education-based efforts from the company. Before today's announcement, Microsoft let 4.5 million students in over 5,000 schools in the U.S. access Bing without ads. Now all a school or school system in the country needs to do is fill out an online form and their Bing search experience won't have any ads after a few days.

Microsoft is clearly going after the vast search market share owned by Google, which is largely supported with ads. Indeed, in a blog post about the Bing in the Classroom details, Microsoft pretty much called Google out for their search policies, stating, "At Bing we think advertising done well is an additive and essential part of the search experience. But sometimes the best innovation is knowing when to take something away."

Microsoft is also letting Bing Rewards members who want to use their points to donate buying a new Surface tablet for their school easier by letting people search for their preferred school by zip code. They can also see how many tablets have been donated to their school and how many Bing Rewards credits have been given towards the purchase of the next Surface.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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13 Comments

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Great news ! But any good thing from Bing are US only... wich is a little bit ordinary from my point of view.

I've never taken any notice of the ads in Google or Bing. Learning to ignore ads on the net is part of human evolution.

theyarecomingforyou said,
I didn't think companies were allowed to advertise to children under the age of 13 anyway.

That would be pretty silly considering all the kids' toys that are marketed toward them. It's more collecting information on the children that's illegal.

Xenosion said,

That would be pretty silly considering all the kids' toys that are marketed toward them. It's more collecting information on the children that's illegal.

Exactly. I never would've learned how cool it was to smoke cigarettes if it wasn't for candy cigarettes!

Kalint said,

Exactly. I never would've learned how cool it was to smoke cigarettes if it wasn't for candy cigarettes!

I must be an odd ball. I loved chewing candy cigs and I never ended up smoking at all.

LogicalApex said,

I must be an odd ball. I loved chewing candy cigs and I never ended up smoking at all.

Hey, that makes two of us... I remember two types, one was the hard ones where it was just a white stick basically, which they later renamed "bones" to get around that... and the other gummy ones that had a paper wrapper and starch in the wrapper you could blow fake smoke out of... never smoked in my life

SK[ said,]Bing's new #1 search term? "Google".

Yeah, sure, that is why keeps on taking shares from google and ads spent growth is more than double thats of google.

revben said,

Yeah, sure, that is why keeps on taking shares from google and ads spent growth is more than double thats of google.

Because Bing has such a low marketshare the growth will look much bigger compared to anyone else. Google has the most and has topped out tho they are still making a bundle.

techbeck said,

Because Bing has such a low marketshare the growth will look much bigger compared to anyone else. Google has the most and has topped out tho they are still making a bundle.

Google is making a bundle. And they are top dog. But Bing is on their radar and cutting into their profits.

Good move, Kids don't need ads thrown up in their faces...
Meanwhile Google is data mining building online profiles of 5 year olds+showing them ads