Microsoft offers clarity on Office 2013 and Office 365 install rights

There's been a lot of Internet chatter of late about the end-user license agreement for Office 2013, specifically the part where it only has one PC install license. Today, Microsoft offers some clarification on this issue on its official Office blog site.

blog post written by Jevon Fark, a senior marketing manager for Microsoft's Office Division, states Office 2013 install rights are the same as the Product Key Card versions of the older Office 2010, meaning the rights are only for one PC for the life of that computer. Fark added, "In the event that a customer buys the Office 2013 software and installs it on a PC that fails under warranty, the customer can contact support to receive an exemption to activate the Office 2013 software on the replacement PC."

The full package product versions of Office 2010 did allow three PC installations for the Home and Student version, along with two installations each for the Home and Business and Professional versions and all of them had transfer rights. In other words, if you really want a stand-alone version of Office that can also be installed on one that more PC, you might want to buy the older FPP versions of Office 2010 while you still can.

Office 365 Home Premium offers five installations for $99.99 a year, with the University version giving the users two PC installations, along with transfer rights.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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Personally, I prefer the subscription model. I have several computers that I need Office w/Access and Publisher on and hated the idea buying 3 separate licenses of Office Pro at $500 a pop for home use. Now, for $100 a year I get What is essentially Office Pro + an additional 20GB in my Skydrive account AND I get latest version whenever it is released. Lets do a simple cost analysis over a 10year period.

Old method -
3 Licenses of Office Professional Retail Box w/physical media @ $500/ea = $1500
Average of 2.5 year upgrade cycle over 10 years = 4 Upgrades
$1500 x 4 = $6000

New method
1 License of Office 365 Home Premium = $100
10 years of renewals = $1000

That's a whopping $5000 savings over that time frame.

Now before some of you decide to go batcrap crazy about how Microsoft is evil and they suck without any substantiation, let me just explain a few facts -

Whether we like it or not, a large portion of business and personal electronic correspondence occur using some form of Microsoft Office document format. It IS the de facto standard for word processing and spreadsheets. While many great alternatives exist, they don't stand a chance at dethroning Microsoft in this arena for several reasons.

1. Even though many alternatives claim compatibility, they are not perfect. There are very often drastic formatting and character encoding flaws in their conversion algorithms.

2. FOSS alternatives are prone to lack of clear vision and poor execution of objectives, often leading to division of development groups which tends to confuse the average user. If you need an example, look at what happened with OpenOffice and the split that lead to the creation of LibreOffice.

3. Lack of any official support system. Heaven forbid you ever ask a basic question on a FOSS support forum without being torn to shreds by the legions of 1337 h4x0rz for beeing the stupid n00b that you are.

Don't get me wrong, many of the alternatives are great for just plinking around, but they just aren't ready for prime time. Office 365, for me anyway, is a breath of fresh air.

Same here. I've gotten tired of paying big dollars to a company that is strayed further and further away from giving business and serious consumer users what they want and need. (I'll be staying with Windows-7 too.)

So if you buy a new computer because the old one failed outside of warrantee or whatever other reason you're screwed. Basically throwing out your software license together with the old PC. That's real nice...

Actually I always thought the better solution would be:

USB key with the product attached to the Drive-

Allowing the person to use Office on whatever computer they wish. (but only one device at a time).

Which would actually- allow- people to re-install Windows without having to worry about the Office not being activated again. Because it would be activated on the drive itself.


Not heard of Office on Demand? Allows you to use Office on whatever PC you want, as long as you have an internet connection.

I would love for MS Project and MS Visio to be included in the Office 365 Subscriptions... it's a shame that costs extra -- yet InfoPath and Lync Client are included!

Why complain? You don't like it then buy another product. Nobody is forcing you. They are a for profit company needing to satisfy shareholders, and will do anything to maximize it, just like any other company.
I don't like it very much either that only Office360 will be transferable, but hey, I could always install Libreoffice
MS Office to me is the only viable office product out there as my business needs Word more than any other program, so I will swallow my not liking it and will just pay up.

There are still people who will buy subscriptions and find some value in them that I can't see at all. Perpetual license is where you aren't getting ripped off.

People just need to send Microsoft a message and refuse to upgrade to Office 2013. Especially if they do not like subscription based services for software. Microsoft has really gone to far dictating how someone uses their computer. And more importantly the software they purchased with their hard earned money. Home Use Program users are really the only ones to benefit from Office 2013, in regards to licensing. Microsoft may just as well sell their over priced office program to companies and only companies. Anyone with a bit of intelligence should not go for this scam. Their are plenty of alternatives to use. Microsoft has every right to do what they want. But what they are asking for is plainly unethical.

jd100 said,
If you look up the dictionary definition of thief, you would find Microsoft's name in it.

True, companies shouldn't try to make money. They should just give their products away for free.

When did they ever offered telephone support?
The last time I checked, the telephone support are disabled and requires you to have Internet Connections with keys! Am I missing something?

Thank you Zeus, that I get this software free through work.
The only Microsoft product I pay my own money to subscribe to is Xbox Live.

Can mr. Fark define "fails under warranty"? If I have a 4 year old PC that I upgrade and then it fails, or if the ram fails after 6 years (and most ram has a lifetime warranty), does that count?

my point is that for 90% of people this hullabaloo doesn't matter, but for enthusiasts who swap components yearly, what happens? Do we need to buy a new copy every year or so? I would assume so, but if anything in more confused now than I was before.

If the device fails under warranty

e.g. If the Mobo fails and is replaced by the manufacture this would be covered
If the HDD dies and is replaced by the manufacture this would be covered

Failed ram does not mean you have to re-install your OS

That's how I see it anyway

RAM failing shouldn't impact your license or OS, as brent3000 noted. I don't think that or things like graphics card failing/upgrading would be an issue.

If the RAM did cause the license to get messed up (and I don't see how it would), then based on the blog post it appears it'd be covered and an exemption would be issued.

The most common case scenario of a HDD dying after warranty or of people buying a new PC on a frequent basis (every 2 years) make this matters.

All I see if a comparison between Office 2010 and Office 365...

Does this mean MS does not plan to release non PKC versions of 2013?

siah1214 said,

Using KMS with 2013 at our university. So yes, they do. That's not going to change.

So what everybody is complaining about? If the installer doesn't require the net!

The subscription model makes sense if you have multiple computers, but if you are using a single PC then its harder to justify.

This also really depends how regularly MS updates Office, if its once every 3 years as it has in the past then the subscription model really makes no sense for a single machine; but if they do update it once a year with new FEATURES (not just bugs) then a subscription really is price competitive for multiple machines.

I have a subscription and use it on 3 machines for a single $99 per year cost so it makes much more sense than buying 3 individual licenses at $120 each * 3.

Well keep in mind that the subscription gives you the full Office with Access if you need it, so that's a big bonus for me instead of buying Office Professional for $399.

Enron said,
Well keep in mind that the subscription gives you the full Office with Access if you need it, so that's a big bonus for me instead of buying Office Professional for $399.

Never quite understood why people used Access tbh. I've used it, it just didn't seem like a robust database. I use SQL Azure and MySQL.

Enron said,
Well keep in mind that the subscription gives you the full Office with Access if you need it, so that's a big bonus for me instead of buying Office Professional for $399.

yeah,
but most people hardly need advanced stuff after Office 97 (except the excel, maybe)

pgxl said,

Never quite understood why people used Access tbh. I've used it, it just didn't seem like a robust database. I use SQL Azure and MySQL.

I don't use it as a real database or know anybody who does. I just like to use it when working with multiple Excel data files from various sources and need to link things together quickly. It gets the job done.

Torolol said,

yeah,
but most people hardly need advanced stuff after Office 97 (except the excel, maybe)

That may be true if you're unemployed.

pgxl said,

Never quite understood why people used Access tbh. I've used it, it just didn't seem like a robust database. I use SQL Azure and MySQL.

Access is not meant to be an enterprise style Database like SQL Azure and MySQL (both excellent DB management and deployment tools), Access is more for your University Administration and DVD shop to input and efficiently output data that would otherwise be clumsy in Excel

plus you get the expanded SkyDrive use and Skype minutes, so all in all $99 per year is a very good deal as long as they update it each year.

gawicks said,
No office 2013 *does not* have a FPP. So It's not transferrable.

I never said anything about 2013... I just said like always the FPP is transferable... if there was a FPP it would be transferable

Well technically yes, it would be. But there is no such thing as an FPP for the new office. and I don't think there will be according to what Microsoft says.

neufuse said,
I never said anything about 2013... I just said like always the FPP is transferable... if there was a FPP it would be transferable

LOL then why bring it up when the topic is Office 2013? A potato is transferable too but hardly matters, does it?

neufuse said,
so just like always the full packaged product is still transferable.......

So I assume that this
http://office.microsoft.com/en...5FFX102759646%5FXT103926347
is not FPP?
To me it seems like the FPP version of 2010 and not the slim cardboard with just the key we had with 2010.
Anyway if these are the rules I will keep using 2010 or I might will buy it in Europe: Oracle there tried to enforce the same rule of not transferability and lost in Court.

The Product Key Card versions are the no-media versions at Wal-Mart and such? Presumably to turn demos/trials that OEMs include into workable copies? I never knew they had that limitation, although I have no idea what the cost of them are, either. This doesn't much help those who were used to buying the Full Package Product versions, though.

I'm considering Office 365 for myself, but only because I like the features and the fact that to get the full business version of Office is more than I want to spend all at once. I would appreciate a discount of some sort since I already pay for their email and increased SkyDrive storage, though.