Microsoft offers proposal for faster web and mobile apps

Everyone would like to have faster and better access to the Internet, that is something we can all agree on. However, there will always be limitations to those kinds of efforts. Today, Microsoft announced that it has offered a new proposal to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) that it claims will offer better performance on the web while also improving access to the Internet via mobile devices.

In a new post on its Interoperability @ Microsoft blog, the company announced the basics for its proposal, which it calls "HTTP Speed+Mobility". The document is supposed to work with what the IETF is developing for HTTP 2.0, the next generation of specifications for Internet web access.

The blog post states that Microsoft's HTTP Speed+Mobility ideas will not only speed up web access but also provide faster and and more reliable access for apps that run on mobile-based products. It states:

This approach includes keeping people and their apps in control of network access. Specifically, the client remains in control over the content that it receives from the web. This extends a key attribute of the existing HTTP protocol that has served the Web well. The app or browser is in the best position to assess what the user is currently doing and what data is already locally available. This approach enables apps and browsers to innovate more freely, delivering the most relevant content to the user based on the user’s actual needs.

The blog post adds that HTTP Speed+Mobility takes the work that Google has done for its own separate HTTP 2.0 proposal called Google SPDY but adds support for mobile apps to the discussion; the IETF is meeting later this week to consider the new proposals for HTTP 2.0.

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3 Comments

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This looks good as long as the specification is clear and they're willing to accept changes made by the IETF and implement them correctly.

I'm sure Google and other major internet companies will also submit some proposals for this.

Argote said,

I'm sure Google ... will also submit some proposals for this.

Why's that? Google don't like submitting proposals, they just like making their own thing. Just look at SPDY & Dart. instead of working with standard bodies to improve the next version of HTTP and ECMAScript like Microsoft and Apple do, Google just do it alone. Makes you wonder why eh?