Microsoft offers survey on online sharing and consequences

Microsoft is celebrating Data Privacy Day (which is actually on January 28) all this week with new information about how consumers can protect themselves online. Today Microsoft released a new survey and a new infographic (shown below) that shows that the majority of people don't give much thought to the consequences of their various online activities.

Microsoft said in the report detailing the survey results:

Only 44 (percent) of adults and children aged 8 – 17 years old surveyed think about the long-term impact of their online activities on their personal reputation, and only 38 (percent) of adults and 39 (percent) of children think about the long-term impact of their online activities on the reputations of others.

Microsoft also said that less than half of the parents surveyed help their children with managing their online presence and reputations. As you can see from the infographic, quite a few people have had negative effects in their lives due to online activities by other people, including some who have lost their job or have been unable to obtain a job.

Microsoft offers several common sense tips to make sure your online reputation is honest, including monitoring your name and email address in search engines regularly, activating privacy settings and talking with people directly who might be posting information on their online profiles that might affect your own profile and reputation.

Image via Microsoft

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13 Comments

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I can make a post AS anyone, does that make me that person as far as they are concerned? Does it have to be a verifiable account on the other end? It should work both ways. Do the companies relying on this information only accept the information when two valid forms of ID is assigned to the account? Um no, so that makes those companies the problem, and the information useless until proven otherwise, yet they still hold it against people. File this under netfail because there is no fixing this without causing much more damage than what it's worth, but it may help to have a law saying that nothing can be used like this unless and until actually proven (but that will never happen because of time and money).

I have always hated the fact that employers are going by the things OTHERS have said about you or posted about you.... heck and some employers just go by a name search when reseraching..... yeah that really works out well when you have a common name!

that's why I have 2 internet persona's, one for the internet and blogs, the other for colleges. each have a different name and email.

mrpakiman said,
that's why I have 2 internet persona's, one for the internet and blogs, the other for colleges. each have a different name and email.

Only two?

Heck, I have one for gaming/tech stuff, school, facebook, "leisurely activities" , and one for everything else.

Do they elaborate on how the two are linked? I guess losing a job / job offer is easy to see.. but losing health insurance? How so? If the health insurance discovers fraud through facebook then I dont see the problem, what other reason could there possibly be?

Julius Caro said,
Do they elaborate on how the two are linked? I guess losing a job / job offer is easy to see.. but losing health insurance? How so? If the health insurance discovers fraud through facebook then I dont see the problem, what other reason could there possibly be?

Yeah, health insurance companies will drop you with a quickness if they can, and especially IF your actually using the insurance for something. Said you were a non-smoker and someone takes a photo of you smoking and posts it online, insurance gone.. etc..

Still, I would like to see the possible lawsuits that stemmed from facebook related descrimination

The facts written with the skyscraper are scary.
14% had a negative experience because of other people's activity. And 21% of them were fired?

They're trying it make it look scarier than it is. The 21% is out of the 14%, so it's 3% of those surveyed.

Still, it's an important message.

ShareShiz said,
Thats why you dont use facebook and dont use your real name while online

Quite.

I never associate my real name with my username unless it's private.

ShareShiz said,
Thats why you dont use facebook and dont use your real name while online

No, that's why you learn to control what you put out there, and learn how to use privacy settings like a champ.

joep1984 said,

No, that's why you learn to control what you put out there, and learn how to use privacy settings like a champ.

That's no guarantee. Privacy settings change on a whim, exposing your information you thought was private.