Microsoft Office 2010 desktop now listed in Windows Store on Windows 8

If you have downloaded and installed the Windows 8 Release Preview but have yet to download and purchase Microsoft Office 2010, the productivity software suite is now available as a listing on the Windows Store. News.com reports that Microsoft Office 2010 has become the first desktop app to receive such a listing in the Windows Store.

While Office 2010 is indeed listed, there is not a way to directly purchase and download the software via the Windows Store. Instead, the listing has a link that opens up Internet Explorer where you can find normal web links to purchase and download the software.

Microsoft had already announced that the Windows Store feature in Windows 8 would list a selection of desktop apps but would not provide a way to directly download them like Windows Store does for Windows 8 Metro apps.

Still, this should give desktop apps for Windows 8 some more exposure than normal. It's also possible that Microsoft could change its mind and give Windows Store new features that would allow for direct downloads of Windows 8 desktop apps.

Source: News.com

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12 Comments

I got my hopes up for a second because all the apps in the Windows Store now MUST be free in the preview. I thought they were giving some away.

AND, it can not link to a download site, that defeats the purpose of a store.

ccoltmanm said,
I got my hopes up for a second because all the apps in the Windows Store now MUST be free in the preview. I thought they were giving some away.

AND, it can not link to a download site, that defeats the purpose of a store.

Actually it's been widely know since the store was first described that you can only download metro apps for the store. Non-metro apps can be listed, but only as links to that desktop app's own website or download/purchase mechanism. Whatever that might be.

ccoltmanm said,

AND, it can not link to a download site, that defeats the purpose of a store.

Yes but it also would be a nightmare for Microsoft to try to take control of existing software distribution through the Windows Store.

Just the fighting would be enough to create daily EU and anti-trust complaints.
Listing and Distribution are two entirely different models, and Microsoft would be insane to take on any responsibility of distribution for the existing software base that Windows can run, literally going back to software that is 30 years old.

Think of just one aspect, like dealing with distribution 'revenue' disputes and issues for 20 million software titles.

(Microsoft took a beating just for how browser appeared in the EU versions that had the 'pick your browser' functionality of Windows, imagine a store with this type of petty competition and infighting. Firefox and Google and McAfee and Symantec are already filing lawsuits left and right at Microsoft for Windows 8, and it is their freaking OS, even with the past monopoly ruling, these companies have NO RIGHT to demand anything of Microsoft, but the EU and other idiots will give them a voice anyway.)

There is also the other distribution models and companies that would scream bloody murder, as companies like Steam and Amazon have a lot of money invested in software distribution and purchasing on Windows.

There is also the certification process.

By 'moving' to the WinRT framework and Metro and moving to a the new usability, and submitting their applications for Microsoft distribution, developers are basically agreeing that they are giving trusting Microsoft to uphold their end of the deal and not complain.

There is also software reliability, and doing automated testing on non WinRT based applications would be problematic, as they are machine code and running in unfettered.

The WinRT framework ensures that Microsoft can do extensive testing for stability, feature requirements, and security. This way Microsoft doesn't have the responsibility of 'distributing' malware hidden in some obscure x86 machine code. (This is why WP7 and its Apps are highly stable and secure.)

David085 said,
No, thanks for me I will be waiting for Office 15 :-)

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/try

You don't have to buy Office 2010, or wait, just install the trial, it will give you 60 days, and we should be seeing the preview of Office 15 soon.

(People often forget that the 60day trial is available. It is really handy for test environments where you have non-retail keys that are consumed when used.)

This is the Store...
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/window...re-for-release-preview.aspx

This is the Certification basics...
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u.../windows/apps/hh694083.aspx

Desktop Applications appear in the Store, but have strict rules to forward to their own site or other distribution company, as Microsoft will not do distribution or provide App purchase functionality for non-WinRT/Metro Applications.

They would be insane to pick up this functionality at this point, maybe someday in the future, but right now there are other companies and Microsoft would be shooting themselves in the head if they picked up existing software distribution and payment processing.**

**(Sliding the payment systems to Microsoft alone would be an economic concern for the World economy, let alone the liability and nightmares it would create for Microsoft when dealing with literally over 100 million of Applications that go back to the 1970s.)

And this shouldn't be news, as this was *specifically* explained in the first blog about the Windows Store. While desktop (as in Win32) applications could indeed be listed, they would use the existing direct sales channels set up by the developer/publisher - not the Store's own mechanism, which is geared toward WinRT. (QuickBooks and TurboTax were, in fact, given as examples - sensible, as this was close to tax-filing time in the US.) By doing this with Office, Microsoft is actually daring to say that they won't play favorites - not even with their own applications! The only other digital-distribution system with this sort of neutrality is Steam - and nobody expected such neutrality out of Microsoft. (Take that, regulators.)

This isn't showing in the UK. At this rate the store is going to be so fragmented, there's quite a few apps even now that are US only (like TuneIn).

How is that application going to play out on a smartphone or tablet, when one needs to create a multiple-page report or a data-intensive spreadsheet? Remember, no hardware keyboard allowed.

TsarNikky said,
How is that application going to play out on a smartphone or tablet, when one needs to create a multiple-page report or a data-intensive spreadsheet? Remember, no hardware keyboard allowed.

And where does this strange new 'no hardware keyboard allowed' rule come from?

TsarNikky said,
How is that application going to play out on a smartphone or tablet, when one needs to create a multiple-page report or a data-intensive spreadsheet? Remember, no hardware keyboard allowed.

Ever heard of wireless USB keyboards? Several are available (including from Logitech and Microsoft - among MANY others) and they can be notebook-sized to full-sized.

duddit2 said,
And where does this strange new 'no hardware keyboard allowed' rule come from?

Good question considering some of the new RT machines come with detachable keyboards.

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