Microsoft Office 2010 goes on sale today

Microsoft's next big version of its office suite officially goes on sale today in retail stores across the world. The highly anticipated release of Office 2010 has been through months of beta testing since November of last year. TechNet and MSDN subscribers were the first to get Office 2010 back in April this year.

What's new
With the new edition of Office, came numerous changes to the UI, applications and even x64 support. Throughout all the applications in the Office 2010 suite the ribbon is used, offering its users a similar experience at the top of the screen. The customizable ribbon lets you quickly access important tools and features for getting your Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other applications looking just right.

64-bit support
This is the first time Microsoft has made Office available in an x64-edition. The 64-bit edition only runs on x64 machines running Windows Vista or Windows 7 64-bit, which takes advantage of your processors speed. Office 2010 really does utilize your 64-bit processor, launching applications faster and being able to work with larger amounts of data in Excel 2010.

Editions
Much like the Windows operating system, Office 2010 comes in many different flavours for you to choose from. The editions start from the Starter Edition, giving you basic support in Word and Excel, but includes advertisements - and is completely free.  And working all the way up to the Professional Plus, offering you every thing that the Office suite has (excluding Visio and Project 2010), which includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access, Communicator, InfoPath and SharePoint Workspace (Groove).

Upgradeable
Much like Windows 7, Office 2010 gives you the ability to upgrade at any-time from a lower version of the suite, up to Professional Plus. Consumers can purchase the Home and Student edition, which gives you Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote and if they require Outlook, they can upgrade to Home and Business within Office 2010.

Web Apps
Not only can you work on your desktop or laptop, but now you can have friends (who don't even need Office 2010 installed) to collaborate with you over the Internet. You can share your PowerPoint presentation with your friend and have him help edit your work on the fly. With Web Apps, you can share any document from Office 2010 with your friends and family, while they help you out.

Mobile Office 2010
The release co-incides with today's Office 2010 launch. The new Office suite is made for Windows Mobile 6.5. A different version of Office Mobile will ship with Windows Phone 7 later this year.

Mac Edition (Office 2011)
Microsoft also promised to deliver a full version of Outlook in the Mac 2011 version.  The full version of Outlook for Mac will include .PST file importing, Time Machine and Spotlight support.  Users who are already familiar with Outlook for Windows should be comfortable with the Mac release.  However, Office Mac 2011 will only be available in 32-bit.

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I love Office 2010!
I'm using x64 versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Visio - not a single problem so far (and it's been over a month of heavy use).

* new "File" menu/screen/tab made print preview and document property editing very easy; and it means that huge round button from Office 2007 is gone for good; also love the ability to "pin" frequently used documents in "Recent" files list (similar to Windows 7)
* Ribbon in Visio is very convenient (why it wasn't added in Visio 2007 is beyond my understanding)
* spark-lines in Excel are a small addition that quickly became a major one (for me :-) ) - very useful
* "Paste" buttons in context menu are a very nice touch
* native x64 means that no 32-bit compatibility processes (for printing or fonts) are being launched in the background (I know that 99.9999% of normal people won't care - but I did)
* and since I use Windows 7 support for jump-lists and correct thumbnail previews is much appreciated

I think the reason I like Office 2010 is that it feels really polished compared to 2007. It's like Windows 7 when compared to Vista

EDIT: And of course I forgot to say that the biggest complaint I had about 2007 is now fixed - Ribbon is now customizable!

Should have bought it when it was offered at 20% less than its new price at the Ultimate Steal. Oh well, it's still no where as expensive as a full licence.

This is bollox! Other languages can download this for free from MS.
The Japanese version requires you to snail mail proof of purchase and costs over $30 to boot.

Why the double standards, MS?

Shiranui said,
This is bollox! Other languages can download this for free from MS.
The Japanese version requires you to snail mail proof of purchase and costs over $30 to boot.

Why the double standards, MS?


Cause they hate those Asians, what else could it POSSIBLY be?

"Upgradeable"

I don't see any mention of this by Microsoft. Does somebody have a source for this? I don't think this is accurate...

I was able to get Professional Plus version for 9.99 using Microsoft's Home Use Program with my company.....and I get to install it on my Desktop and Laptop, just like any Retail Pricing.....it doesn't get any better than that!

You can get Microsoft Office Professional Academic 2010 for £50 through The Ultimate Steal - includes Word, Powerpoint, Excel, Outlook, Access, Publisher, OneNote.

Bargain!

bbfc_uk said,
You can get Microsoft Office Professional Academic 2010 for £50 through The Ultimate Steal - includes Word, Powerpoint, Excel, Outlook, Access, Publisher, OneNote.

Bargain!

Pretty good deal.

Has anyone downloaded 2010 yet to upgrading their late-adopter 2007 version? I bought 2007 last month in anticipation for 2010 (Home and Student 2007 was $99 and H&S 2010 was projected to price at $150...since 2007 came with a free upgrade to 2010 I went with that and saved $50).

Shadrack said,
Has anyone downloaded 2010 yet to upgrading their late-adopter 2007 version? I bought 2007 last month in anticipation for 2010 (Home and Student 2007 was $99 and H&S 2010 was projected to price at $150...since 2007 came with a free upgrade to 2010 I went with that and saved $50).

Just finished upgrading uisng the Ultimate Steal Deal. Very smooth install (after having to uninstall everything from the preview version). Instaled the x64 version to a SSD and it is blazing fast.

IndyLateNite said,

Just finished upgrading uisng the Ultimate Steal Deal. Very smooth install (after having to uninstall everything from the preview version). Instaled the x64 version to a SSD and it is blazing fast.

Did you get that 64-bit version from the Tech Guarantee? I just upgraded with that and it only put on the 32-bit, even though my Windows 7 machine is 64-bit!

EDIT: My bad. You do have to uninstall the 32-bit version of 2007 first.

Edited by MulletRobZ, Jun 15 2010, 11:04pm :

MulletRobZ said,

Did you get that 64-bit version from the Tech Guarantee? I just upgraded with that and it only put on the 32-bit, even though my Windows 7 machine is 64-bit!

EDIT: My bad. You do have to uninstall the 32-bit version of 2007 first.

Yeah, I downloaded the 32 bit version myself first. When I got the download page, the Advanced Options was not visible. When I went back into my account and tried the download again, the Advanced Options was available.

Some of the prices seems to me are a bad joke...
E.G. Academic Version $79,95 official pro Version 499$, 400$ only for a nice box and support that I will never call?
Office Home and Business $279, Pro $499 ? Access have nearly the same price than all other MS Office Applications in sum? (As a "professional home user" I don't need the publisher, I can use word)

Lastwebpage said,
Some of the prices seems to me are a bad joke...
E.G. Academic Version $79,95 official pro Version 499$, 400$ only for a nice box and support that I will never call?
Office Home and Business $279, Pro $499 ? Access have nearly the same price than all other MS Office Applications in sum? (As a "professional home user" I don't need the publisher, I can use word)

MS has been experimental with their licensing since 2007. Essentially the price difference has more to do with the licensing than with the included applications. Academic versions never allow commercial use (i.e., you cannot make money with that version or use it in any way shape or form to support money making activities). Pro version does allow commercial use.

Office Home and Business allows some commercial use, but I think that it is still limited. If I had a "home business" with a handful of employees, I could probably get away with Home and Business editions for me and my employees. If my operation was large enough to be considered a "small business" all the way up to a corporation then I do not think I would be able to use Office Home and Business due to licensing restrictions. I'm not sure how the licensing is written for this (this is different than what they did for 2007), but I would imagine it would be related to the amount of money your business pulls in.

I have Microsoft Office Ultimate 2007, do I really need to buy Office 2010 or you think I can catch the next version (Office 2013)?

is Office even worth getting, especially at the prices they want when you got a decent alternative Open Office?

because stuff like Open Office seems like it can do most of the basics well enough, right?

p.s. i don't really use either to much so forgive me if that comment sounds stupid

ThaCrip said,
is Office even worth getting, especially at the prices they want when you got a decent alternative Open Office?

because stuff like Open Office seems like it can do most of the basics well enough, right?

p.s. i don't really use either to much so forgive me if that comment sounds stupid

A simple term paper or spreadsheet then yea Open Office is good. Even Google Docs is good. Microsoft has a Web office that just came out and its ok. One probolem I see is that my double space documents are all single space.

ThaCrip said,
is Office even worth getting, especially at the prices they want when you got a decent alternative Open Office?

because stuff like Open Office seems like it can do most of the basics well enough, right?

p.s. i don't really use either to much so forgive me if that comment sounds stupid

Stupid? Nope. Uninformed, maybe.

I have nothing against OO (because of the performance issues involving PDF export, that was one reason I used to keep OO for Win32 around); however, Word 2010 x64 is actually *faster* than OO Win x32 at PDF export on my E1200. Then there is the fact that Office Professional and above include *Outlook*, which has not been equalled by anything on the FOSS front yet (and I'm talking strictly in terms of POP3/IMAP support). OO's only real advantage over Office is *price/cost*; however, once you take that out of the mix, as much as the zealots may not want to hear it, OO loses, and loses badly.

Got it at home and work thanks to my workplace since the MSDN release, love it.

People call it a minor upgrade... I feel that even compared to 2007, it is a substantial upgrade.

kaffra said,
not sure if this is a worthwhile upgrade from 2007. Any in depth guide on whats improved?

Performance has improved across the board from 2007, especially if crossgrading to 2010 x64. Outlook adds the Ribbon UI (and supports larger mailboxes), improves the Account Setup Wizard (auto-detection now includes both POP3 and IMAP, including GMail/GoogleMail) and improves download speed for all supported mailbox types. Word has improved document-export perfrormance (including PDF and ODF) along with improved handling of large documents. And those are the least-improved applications

warwagon said,
I have it from Technet. The only thing that feels new is the drop down menu in each app. The rest feels like 2007

Outlook has changed. Now it has a ribbon and conversation view, among other smaller UI tweaks.

PowerPoint has vastly improved video handling, and new GPU-accelerated transitions and animations.

Excel has some interesting things like sparklines, but not much else.

Word is basically untouched as far as I can tell.

JonathanMarston said,

Outlook has changed. Now it has a ribbon and conversation view, among other smaller UI tweaks.

PowerPoint has vastly improved video handling, and new GPU-accelerated transitions and animations.

Excel has some interesting things like sparklines, but not much else.

Word is basically untouched as far as I can tell.

publisher also now has the ribbon

JonathanMarston said,

Outlook has changed. Now it has a ribbon and conversation view, among other smaller UI tweaks.

PowerPoint has vastly improved video handling, and new GPU-accelerated transitions and animations.

Excel has some interesting things like sparklines, but not much else.

Word is basically untouched as far as I can tell.

The export performance (especially for Word x64) has improved significantly over 2007. I had been using PDF-export plug-ins because Word 2007's own PDF export was dog-slow; however, 2010 is blazing fast (even compared to the plug-in-enabled 2007), hence no more plug-ins. (And this is with 3 GB of single-channel DDR2 on a Celeron DC E1200.)

Jedimark said,
Just bought my copy of Professional Plus 2010 for £8.95 via works Home Use Program

how to buy? where?

Sebianoti said,

By "oh wait" you mean its already out?

It got cracked within few days after its release on TechNet and MSDN. It uses some offline server activation emulation whatever stuff or something like that I think.

KavazovAngel said,

It got cracked within few days after its release on TechNet and MSDN. It uses some offline server activation emulation whatever stuff or something like that I think.

But good luck for Trojans and Viruses hiding in the cracks.

KavazovAngel said,
It got cracked within few days after its release on TechNet and MSDN. It uses some offline server activation emulation whatever stuff or something like that I think.
You still need to reactivate it once every 180 days.

Need it? Buy it.

leo221 said,
installed since msdn release, haven't really used it yet

I installed the MSDN Release! So enjoyable to use! I like the new Outlook with Ribbon. Visio and Project, too! You'll never realize that old menus obscured the features you never knew were there! Ribbon is the way to go.