Microsoft: Over 540,000 students and teachers use Windows 8 in US

Microsoft is trying to show that Windows 8 can be used by more than just consumers and businesses. Today, the company announced that so far, over 540,000 students and teachers in grades K-12 and in higher education institutions have been using Windows 8-based systems in their education programs.

Today's press release put the spotlight on a number of the school systems already using Windows 8, including Atlanta, Georgia, one of the largest public school systems in the US. Microsoft states that 48,000 students in the system use Windows 8 on 25,000 virtual desktops. It adds, "Staff designed their own student digital portfolio learning application using SharePoint, which grants students seamless access to their desktop experience, Office 365 Education, and Office Web Apps from school or any offsite PC or device."

Over 3,000 kids who go to public school in Fargo, North Dakota are using Dell Latitude 10 tablets with Windows 8 installed. A number of colleges are also using Windows 8, including Thomas College in Maine, which has installed Windows 8 on all of its desktops and laptops. Pace University in New York is also rolling out Windows 8 on its 10,000 desktops and other devices. Windows 8 is also being used by the Apollo Group. The press release states:

The adult education and online learning company supports 324,000 students and 25,500 employees worldwide and are building out a standard desktop image, including Office 2013, and making it available to developers and testers in anticipation of a larger rollout in the near future. The most common reason for testing Windows 8 will be the proliferation of touch-based devices and shift to a more mobile workforce, coupled with the increased demand for work-life combination devices.

Source: Microsoft | Image via Dell

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

AMD shows a teaser of its answer to NVIDIA's Titan graphics card

Next Story

Microsoft adds time period options to Bing search results

28 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Actually that's not impressive. My daughters school district only uses Macs and every student has to have an iPad or rent one. No more textbooks. I'm sure there are other schools who do the same. I'd like to see Apples numbers and have a comparison.

JHBrown said,
Actually that's not impressive. My daughters school district only uses Macs and every student has to have an iPad or rent one. No more textbooks. I'm sure there are other schools who do the same. I'd like to see Apples numbers and have a comparison.

^ All elementary schools in my county have iPads now instead of Macbooks, and When I was in HS we were on XP now my brother's school laptop got upgraded to Windows 7 this year. I don't notice many people using Win 8 in my univ either. Not sure if its because of slow pace of adoption of WIn 8 by retailers or people just don't want to upgrade.

lctb51 said,
540,000 teachers and students waste time playing Angry Birds and screwing around with Metro on Windows 8 in the US!

^
what else can metro do? I heard it passed 50k apps. Still not a single one that is useful. (I'm exaggerating but seriously the ****ty Windows Phone store has more to offer than this)

You could do that on any machine in the world right now that has a web browser. So that doesn't change anything in regards to Windows 8. Also, if your an admin you would white list the store for school safe and productive apps. It's pretty easy via group policy.

lctb51 said,
540,000 teachers and students waste time playing Angry Birds and screwing around with Metro on Windows 8 in the US!

No I use my computer for real work and I have windows 8 installed on it. Was just doing some programming on it for a class yesterday. I quite enjoy the improved touch support on my x230t though.

mrp04 said,

No I use my computer for real work and I have windows 8 installed on it. Was just doing some programming on it for a class yesterday. I quite enjoy the improved touch support on my x230t though.

Anything you can do in Windows 8 you could have done in Windows 7 before. The only thing new is Metro and minor enhancements. (I'm not one to care about kernel changes/ new file system / etc I'm talking user experience wise). Not worth paying to upgrade. I wouldn't say its a BAD OS its just I wouldn't upgrade to it if I had to pay for it. (I do have Win 8 Installed though since I got it for free )

Dot Matrix said,
So much for Windows 8 being user hostile...

I wouldn't say that out loud. It's a relatively small userbase and you dont know whether or not they're happy with the OS.

But personally I agree, Windows 8 is easy to use. Just a couple of gestures and you're good to go. We all grew up with the desktop so it appears easy to use but when you think about the number of lists and menus in it, its a mess. Even now if you ask the average user to change some basic settings, they have no clue. While it only takes a few minutes to explain the setting charm. Afterwards anyone can change settings in any app.

Ronnet said,
Windows 8 is easy to use. Just a couple of gestures and you're good to go. We all grew up with the desktop so it appears easy to use but when you think about the number of lists and menus in it, its a mess.

The article specifically promotes the Windows 8 desktop experience. W8 is not just Metro. It's a mishmash of Metro and the Desktop. So you need to know how to use the desktop - plus - learn how to navigate the Metro environment.

CSharp. said,

The article specifically promotes the Windows 8 desktop experience. W8 is not just Metro. It's a mishmash of Metro and the Desktop. So you need to know how to use the desktop - plus - learn how to navigate the Metro environment.

you don't have to know how to use the desktop anymore. Pin any desktop programs still in use to the start screen? Tell people how to access the start screen and you're done.

Shadowzz said,

you don't have to know how to use the desktop anymore..

Of course you do. Once you're in a desktop app, the rules of the desktop environment apply (with some unfortunate Metro flourishes). Neither the Settings Charm nor the Search Charm or the App switcher or any of the other UI conventions and design guidelines from Metro apps apply in that context. Unless you abstain from the desktop altogether, Windows 8 actually increases not decreases the overall level of UI complexity, despite the fact that individual (Metro) apps are possibly easier to use compared to your regular Win32 app at least.

Now whether or not that's a big deal is a different question.

CSharp. said,

The article specifically promotes the Windows 8 desktop experience. W8 is not just Metro. It's a mishmash of Metro and the Desktop. So you need to know how to use the desktop - plus - learn how to navigate the Metro environment.

Did everybody who used Windows 3.1 know how to use DOS-mode? You could do a lot more in DOS-mode then you could in 3.1's desktop. Yet Windows' desktop was a much more user friendly environment then DOS so slowly features moved over to the new environment. Yet even today some swear DOS is better. Some people around here will stil say the desktop is better decades from now.

Besides everybody already knows how to use the desktop environment. My point is that Windows 8's new UI isnt hard to get used to. It doesnt take long for someone used to Windows 7 to switch to Windows 8. Although I'll agree that Microsoft should have included a better tutorial. But in a few years from now a kid who is used to Windows 8 will have a much harder to getting around in the desktop. I stil remember how difficult it was for me to launch old games in DOS-mode as a kid.

The tech is too expensive for most schools but it fits.

I'm planning to get a Surface RT before I return to university. Just waiting for a price drop...

If I were you I would save for a tablet like the Dell Latitude 10 pictured above with a stylus. I went through college with an old Windows XP based slate PC. It was heavy, underpowered, expensive, and had terrible battery life. But man, that stylus was amazing for taking notes and doing homework. Something like the Dell Latitude 10 or Surface Pro would have been a dream for me going through college.

ModernMech said,
If I were you I would save for a tablet like the Dell Latitude 10 pictured above with a stylus. I went through college with an old Windows XP based slate PC. It was heavy, underpowered, expensive, and had terrible battery life. But man, that stylus was amazing for taking notes and doing homework. Something like the Dell Latitude 10 or Surface Pro would have been a dream for me going through college.

I've done my bachelor with a P1610 so I think I know what you mean. But I never been a fan of the stylus. I'm just faster with typing. I also love the Surface design. I've tried out touch cover a few times in the store and its something I can get used to.

But I have the luxery of time so I'm waiting for a price drop or for something better to come out. Something from Nokia for example. I think their hardware is superb and their software support has been outstanding. I love to get a tablet from them.

ModernMech said,
If I were you I would save for a tablet like the Dell Latitude 10 pictured above with a stylus. I went through college with an old Windows XP based slate PC. It was heavy, underpowered, expensive, and had terrible battery life. But man, that stylus was amazing for taking notes and doing homework. Something like the Dell Latitude 10 or Surface Pro would have been a dream for me going through college.

I liked the Surface Pro and the only complaint I really have about it is that the screen doenst stat propped up without the stand and the KB takes a little to get used to. Other than that, I like it. Fact, not to heavy. Have not had the chance to fool around with other systems.

techbeck said,

I liked the Surface Pro and the only complaint I really have about it is that the screen doenst stat propped up without the stand and the KB takes a little to get used to. Other than that, I like it. Fact, not to heavy. Have not had the chance to fool around with other systems.

Do you have the Type Cover or the Touch Cover? In any case, Microsoft would be foolish not to start offering a real keyboard dock accessory like Asus offers. I would expect them to release something like that in a few months.

education is probably the one place touch does work... schools use smart boards a lot now, so tablets fit in fine, touch screens fit in fine, most educational software now is designed for smart boards and touch interaction

I agree.. I have a 9 year old and 5 year old at home.. They picked it up with great easy and they're using it for their studies/home schooling.

MorganX said,
I acutally think Windows 8 and the Modern UI would/will be fantastic for educational software. Absolutely.

Did they forget to quote you in the press release? Sorry, but 800 million + are satisfied with Windows 7.

What does that have to do with Windows 8 and the Modern UI being well suited to educational software?

Mr. Dee said,

Did they forget to quote you in the press release? Sorry, but 800 million + are satisfied with Windows 7.

They are children, they will find anything like the Modern UI productive. Students where I work say Facebook is a productive tool which they use to store files, but that doesn't mean its really productive.